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Tag: South Carolina Ecological Services Field Office

The content below has been tagged with the term “South Carolina Ecological Services Field Office.”

Articles

  • A small green plant growing in a sand dune with bright red/pink stems.
    Seabeach amaranth at Onslow Beach, Camp Lejeune, NC. Photo by Lilibeth Serrano, USFWS.

    From Massachusetts to South Carolina, recovering seabeach amaranth

    December 7, 2017 | 6 minute read

    This is a story about people, places and a plant — but it’s more than just that. This is a story about faith in a tiny little seed and the huge potential for recovering a threatened species. First things first — the plant Most people have probably never heard of seabeach amaranth, but for such an obscure little dune plant, it bears a mighty burden. This low-growing annual colonizes newly disturbed habitats such as over-wash areas at the end of barrier islands and flat, low-lying areas along the foremost dunes.  Learn more...

  • A woodpecker perched on a tree with a bug in its mouth
    A red-cockaded woodpecker has dinner outside its nesting cavity. Photo by USFWS.

    The woodpecker’s journey

    November 20, 2017 | 9 minute read

    It was getting dark. A light rain fell. Distant thunder rolled across the steamy, late-summer sky. The hunters were apprehensive. Their prey: endangered red-cockaded woodpeckers.  Learn more...

  • A building built on steel footings ready for hurricane force winds.
    Information icon The rebuilt Grand Bay National Wildlife Refuge visitor's center built to withstand future storms.

    Service facilities built to withstand nature’s worst

    November 9, 2017 | 5 minute read

    Hurricanes are never welcome, but they can prompt changes in buildings to make them better, stronger, and more capable of handling high water and even higher winds.  Learn more...

  • Two USFWS employees chatting in front of a marsh.
    Information icon Nancy Fernandez and Monica Harris share a moment at the Pinckney Island National Wildlife Refuge in South Carolina. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    Connecting urban and rural

    November 8, 2017 | 7 minute read

    Nancy Fernandez’s job is to lure more Americans into the great outdoors. Sounds simple enough. But here’s what she’s up against:  Learn more...

  • Bright green grass emerges from a huge marsh.
    Pinckney Island National Wildlife Refuge in South Carolina is a kayaker’s paradise. Photo by Eric Horan, USFWS.

    Refuges reach out to urban visitors

    November 8, 2017 | 7 minute read

    Hilton Head Island, South Carolina — The hiker was in bad shape. Overweight and exhausted, she had crumpled into a sitting position along the Ibis Pond Trail at the Pinckney Island National Wildlife Refuge. Her face turned red, almost purple. Sweat poured in torrents. Her breathing was labored. Heat stroke seemed imminent under the searing sun with temperatures nearing 100 degrees. Monica Harris and Nancy Fernandez — mercifully — happened by in their U.  Learn more...

  • Water flows freely under a new bridge.
    Information icon Gills Creek Drive crossing at Gills Creek after replacement Photo by USFWS.

    Fish passage project benefits Carolina heelsplitter

    October 13, 2017 | 2 minute read

    In Lancaster County, South Carolina, more than three miles of critical habitat has been cleared for the Carolina heelsplitter, a mussel federally listed as endangered. Carolina heelsplitter. Photo by USFWS. The county is home to about one-third of the heelsplitter’s remaining occupied habitat. In South Carolina, the heelsplitter is only found in the Savannah, Saluda, Catawba and Pee Dee river systems in York, Lancaster, Chester, Kershaw, Chesterfield, Edgefield, McCormick, Greenwood, and Saluda Counties.  Learn more...

  • An entrance gate with a historical marker.
    Information icon Entry road to Revolutionary War hero General Francis Marion’s grave and Oakland Club. Photo by Jason Ayers, USFWS.

    South Carolina Coastal Program helps protect 11,000 acres in Berkeley County

    September 26, 2017 | 3 minute read

    The 11,000-acre, privately-owned Oakland Club, located in Berkeley County, South Carolina, is now a permanently protected site for several state species of concern and federally protected species. These species include bobwhite quail, American chaffseed, eastern diamondback rattlesnakes, red-cockaded woodpeckers, swallow-tailed kites, Swainson’s warblers, and Southern hognose snakes. Once home to Revolutionary War hero General Francis Marion, the Oakland Club parallels the Santee River and lies between the Francis Marion National Forest and the Santee National Wildlife Refuge.  Learn more...

News

  • A cluster of carnivorious plant heads with bright red/orange mouths.
    Information icon Venus flytrap. Photo by Jennifer Koches, USFWS.

    Bat, snail, and popular plant may need endangered species protection

    December 19, 2017 | 5 minute read

    More research is needed on three species before U.S. Fish and Wildlife officials can determine whether to add them to the threatened and endangered species list. More scientific and commercial information will be compiled for the Venus flytrap, located in the Carolinas; oblong rocksnail, located in Alabama; and tricolored bat, located in 38 states, including Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee. The Service and its partners will continue to research the species’ life history, biological requirements and habitats to develop a Species Status Assessment (SSA) and 12-month finding.  Read the full story...

  • A group of USFWS personnel in a circle for a meeting.
    Incident Commander a Sami Gray briefs N MS Task Force team before heading into Big Pine Key to provide support following hurricane. Photo by USFWS.

    Service crews head south

    September 13, 2017 | 2 minute read

    Hurricane Irma had hardly dissipated before U.S. Fish and Wildlife (Service) crews headed south, tracing in reverse the path the storm had cut across Florida and Georgia. In trucks and cars they crossed into Florida, or headed for south Georgia. The teams are bringing fuel, water, food, chainsaws and more to look after people and places in Irma’s path. Crews ran into “logistical challenges” on interstates crowded with evacuees headed home, said Sami Gray, who is leading the Service’s response effort.  Read the full story...

  • Three men meet before deloying with heavy equipment.
    Information icon USFWS employees at Mississippi Sandhill Crane finalize their equipment and supply checks before responding to Florida to support the Irma recovery response in Florida. Photo by USFWS.

    Service assesses damage, starts cleanup

    September 12, 2017 | 3 minute read

    Hurricane Irma, once a category 5 storm, has nearly played itself out. As of Tuesday, Sept. 12, the storm that howled up the west coast of Florida had dwindled to gusts and rain over North Carolina – a tempest, still, but nothing like the terror that came ashore two days earlier. Weather in Florida is returning to what is normal this time of year, said Kevin Scasny, a meteorologist with the U.  Read the full story...

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