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Tag: South Carolina Ecological Services Field Office

The content below has been tagged with the term “South Carolina Ecological Services Field Office.”

Articles

  • A man wearing a yellow hard hat and firefighting gear
    Information icon Stephen McGuin. Photo by Nicole Vidal, USFWS.

    On the front lines

    July 27, 2018 | 7 minute read

    Austin Griffin and Stephen McGuin are training to become wildland firefighters, an odd career choice given their unusual, at-times troubled backgrounds. Yet they’re perfect fits for a still-new training program crafted by The Nature Conservancy (TNC) to put a diverse and economically disadvantaged cadre of young men and women on the front firefighting lines.  Learn more...

  • Veterans carry their hog through a swamp.
    Information icon Two wounded warriors and a volunteer, accompanied by a cameraman, carry a feral pig through the swamp at Waccamaw National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by SOWW.

    Hog heaven

    March 28, 2018 | 3 minute read

    Feral pigs are widely considered a nuisance species. The wild hogs cause an estimated $1.5 billion in property damage every year all over the United States on both public and private lands, according to the Mississippi State University Center for Resolving Human-Wildlife Conflicts. They are an invasive species that can disrupt entire food chains. “They’re really bad for the ecosystem,” said Craig Sasser, refuge manager at Waccamaw National Wildlife Refuge in South Carolina.  Learn more...

News

  • The sun over a round, blue earth covered in part by an enormous circular cloud formation
    Information icon Hurricane Florence from space on September 14, 2018. Photo by Ricky Arnold, NASA.

    Storm weakens, wanders

    September 14, 2018 | 2 minute read

    Hurricane Florence hit the coast of North Carolina Friday morning, weakening as it struck near Wilmington. But, even with its winds subsiding, the storm remained a threat to coastal areas in at least two states. Florence, once a Category 4 hurricane, is now Category 1, said Kevin Scasny, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) meteorologist. Though its winds, he said this morning, occasionally gusted to 90 mph. Even so, Scasny said in a telephone call with Service officials in Atlanta, the storm is a significant hazard — and will remain so for several days.  Read the full story...

  • A circular cloud pattern as seen from space.
    Information icon Hurricane Florence as seen from the International Space Station. Photo by NASA.

    Florence being felt at Coastal Wildlife Refuges

    September 13, 2018 | 2 minute read

    Hurricane Florence’s travel plans remain somewhat uncertain, even as it nears land with the promise of once-in-a-lifetime rainfall and flooding. The storm, now a Category 2 with winds hitting 110 mph, remains aimed at Wilmington, North Carolina, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) meteorologist Kevin Scasny told Service officials in a conference call with the agency’s Southeast regional office in Atlanta. The hurricane should strike the coastal city Friday, he said, but outer bands are already being felt at coastal wildlife refuges.  Read the full story...

  • A circular cloud formation as seen from space.
    A high-definition video camera outside the space station captured stark and sobering views of Hurricane Florence, a Category 4 storm. The video was taken on Tuesday as Florence churned across the Atlantic in a west-northwesterly direction with winds of 130 miles per hour. Photo by ESA/NASA–A. Gerst.

    “Dramatic shift” in hurricane’s path

    September 12, 2018 | 3 minute read

    Hurricane Florence now appears poised to make a “big, grand tour” of several Southeastern states and elsewhere in the United States before petering out next week. That’s the assessment from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) meteorologist Kevin Scasny, who’s been tracking the storm since it whirled into life last week. “Stand by for a change in the next two days,” Scasny said in a Wednesday morning call to the Service’s Southeast regional headquarters in Atlanta, where officials are preparing for the hurricane’s landfall on Friday.  Read the full story...

  • A circular cloud seen from space.
    Information icon Hurricane Florence from the International Space Station. Photo by Astronaut Ricky Arnold, NASA.

    Service prepares for Hurricane Florence impact in Carolinas

    September 11, 2018 | 2 minute read

    Hurricane Florence has the Carolinas in her sights. The Category 4 storm, with winds of up to 130 miles per hour, is expected to hit the North Carolina coast north of Wilmington late Thursday night, bringing a storm surge of 4-12 feet, according to Kevin Scasny, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) meteorologist. Florence has the potential to cause “catastrophic damage,” Scasny said Tuesday morning on a planning conference call conducted by the Service.  Read the full story...

  • A male red wolf looks on as two pups play
    Information icon Red wolf (Canis rufus) with pups. Photo by Valerie, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    Service reopens comment period on new management rule for red wolves in North Carolina

    August 10, 2018 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is reopening the public comment period on a proposed rule to replace the existing regulations governing the nonessential experimental population of the red wolf under section 10(j) of the Endangered Species Act (ESA). On June 28, 2018, the Service published in the Federal Register a proposed rule that would remove management efforts from existing private lands and instead focus continuing efforts on certain public lands in Hyde and Dare counties, North Carolina.  Read the full story...

  • A small woodpecker perched on a pine tree.
    Information icon In 2018, there were 38 active clusters of endangered red-cockaded woodpeckers on this property in Alabama, thriving there under a Safe Harbor Agreement. Composite photo by Mark Bailey.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of 42 southeastern species

    August 3, 2018 | 7 minute read

    The red-cockaded woodpecker is one of 42 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife and plants that will get updated five-year status reviews conducted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in the months ahead. They are all found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before October 5, 2018. These five-year reviews, required by the Endangered Species Act (ESA) will ensure listing classifications under the ESA are accurate and recommend changes in status where appropriate based on the latest science and analysis.  Read the full story...

  • A bright green parrot with red markings on its face and blue flight feathers.
    When in flight, some of the PR Parrots show their beautiful blue primary feathers. En español: Algunas cotorras muestran sus bellas plumas primarias azules al volar. Bosque del Estado, Maricao, Puerto Rico. Photo by Jan Paul Zegarra, Biologist, USFWS

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and NOAA Fisheries seek public input on proposed reforms to improve and modernize implementation of the Endangered Species Act

    July 19, 2018 | 5 minute read

    Continuing efforts to improve how the Endangered Species Act (ESA) is implemented, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Fisheries today proposed revisions to certain regulations to ensure clarity and consistency. The changes incorporate public input, best science and best practices to improve reliability, regulatory efficiency and environmental stewardship. “The Trump Administration is dedicated to being a good neighbor and being a better partner with the communities in which we operate.  Read the full story...

  • A low growing shrub with bright purple flowers.
    Information icon Endangered Pyne’s ground-plum. Photo by NPS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of 35 Southeastern species

    May 7, 2018 | 5 minute read

    As part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of 35 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife, and plants. These species are found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before July 6, 2018. These five-year reviews will ensure listing classifications under the ESA are accurate and recommend changes in status where appropriate based on the latest science and analysis.  Read the full story...

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