skip to content

Tag: South Carolina Ecological Services Field Office

The content below has been tagged with the term “South Carolina Ecological Services Field Office.”

Charleston

  • A man wearing a green plaid shirt pulls his horse's face close to his own
    Information icon Roger Revenelle and his horse Hugo. Photo by Jessica Collier, USFWS.

    Stories

    Stories from the South Carolina Ecological Services Field Office.  Learn more...

  • An orange, black and white butterfly perched on a white flower.
    Information icon Monarch butterfly on Sullivans Island. Photo by Jennifer Koches, USFWS.

    Wildlife

    Wildlife at the South Carolina Ecological Services Field Office.  Learn more...

Wildlife

  • A leafy green plant emerging from the leaf-littered forest floor.
    Information icon Small-whorled pogonia on the forest floor. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Small-whorled pogonia

    The small-whorled pogonia is a rare orchid listed as threatened on the endangered species list.  Visit the species profile...

  • A black, grey and yellow snake with a rounded head.
    Information icon Southern hognose snake. Photo by Pierson Hill, FWC.

    Southern hognose snake

    Taxon: Reptile Range: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina Status: At-risk species, petitioned for listing on July 11, 2012; 90-day-finding that petitioned action may be warranted First described by Carl Linneaus in 1766 from a specimen received from Charleston, South Carolina, the southern hognose snake is the smallest of the five species of hognose snakes native to North America. All belonging to the genus Heterodon, there is the eastern hognose snake (H.  Visit the species profile...

  • Bright pink conical flowers.
    Information icon Flowering swamp pink. Photo by Maja Dumat, CC BY 2.0.

    Swamp pink

    Swamp pink and it’s beautiful conical flower is only found in wetlands along streams and seepage areas in freshwater swamps.  Visit the species profile...

  • A Florida manatee calf sticks close to its mother in shallow water
    Information icon A Florida manatee calf sticks close to its mother in shallow water. Photo: Keith Ramos, USFWS

    West Indian manatee

    Manatees are large, elongated marine mammals with paired flippers and a large round or spoon-shaped tail. They can reach lengths of over 14 feet and weights of over 3,000 pounds  Visit the species profile...

Contact Us:

Looking for a media contact? Reach out to a regional spokesperson.

Share this page

Tweet this page on Twitter or follow @USFWSsoutheast

Share this page on Facebook or follow USFWSsoutheast.

LinkedIn

Share this page on LinkedIn