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Tag: Sicklefin Redhorse

The content below has been tagged with the term “Sicklefin Redhorse.”

Articles

  • Three women checking out a poster.
    Information icon Visitors get a chance to look at types of diseases that can be found on fish. Photo by USFWS.

    Open house at Warm Springs National Fish Hatchery

    October 24, 2017 | 2 minute read

    A cool October day welcomed visitors to the annual Open House held at the Warm Springs National Fish Hatchery in Georgia on Saturday, Oct. 14. The event was sponsored by the fisheries programs on site: the National Fish Hatchery, Fish Technology Center, and the Fish Health Center. Staff members and volunteers provided about 150 visitors with information on projects underway at Warm Springs and answered questions through the day. Members of the hatchery’s volunteer support group, Friends in Support of the Hatchery, were also there to welcome visitors and provide refreshments.  Learn more...

  • A piece of heavy machinery deconstructs a small dam.
    A trackhoe begins the work of demolishing Dillsboro Dam. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Western North Carolina dam removal clears the way for imperiled species

    January 25, 2010 | 4 minute read

    As a handful of people watched, heavy machinery obliterated the powerhouse for North Carolina’s Dillsboro Dam, the most visible sign yet of the impending removal of the 12-foot high dam itself, scheduled to begin in early February. Dillsboro Dam, built in 1913, is one of a series of Duke Energy hydropower facilities on western North Carolina’s Tuckasegee River. Federal law requires operators of private hydropower dams to address impacts to fish and wildlife.  Learn more...

  • A NC biologist holding a sicklefin redhorse on a river bank in front of a hydroelectric dam.
    Information icon North Carolina biologist TR Russ holding an sicklefin redhorse. Photo by Mark Cantrell, USFWS.

    Researchers work to keep rare ƒish off endangered species list

    June 30, 2008 | 4 minute read

    On the bank of the Little Tennessee River, downstream from the town of Franklin, biologists squeeze tiny yellow eggs from a fish into a plastic bag. Unlike caviar, these eggs won’t be eaten, but rather trucked to a high-tech aquatic lab in Knoxville, Tennessee, to join an effort to keep a rare fish off the endangered species list. The fish is a sicklefin redhorse, a recently discovered species found only in the western tip of North Carolina and a small bit of North Georgia.  Learn more...

News

  • A NC biologist holding a sicklefin redhorse on a river bank in front of a hydroelectric dam.
    Information icon North Carolina biologist TR Russ holding an sicklefin redhorse. Photo by Mark Cantrell, USFWS.

    Power companies, tribe, agencies take steps to save rare fish

    February 23, 2016 | 4 minute read

    Power companies, the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, and state and federal agencies have come together to conserve the sicklefin redhorse, a fish found in only six Appalachian counties worldwide and being considered for the federal endangered species list. The sicklefin redhorse is found in Jackson, Macon, Swain, Clay, and Cherokee counties, North Carolina; and Towns County, Georgia. It was only recently discovered to be a distinct species, triggered by the 1992 observations of Roanoke College’s Robert Jenkins.  Read the full story...

Podcasts

  • A NC biologist holding a sicklefin redhorse on a river bank in front of a hydroelectric dam.
    North Carolina biologist TR Russ holding an sicklefin redhorse. Photo by Mark Cantrell, USFWS.

    Sicklefin redhorse

    January 25, 2016 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Power companies, the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, and state and federal agencies have come together to conserve the sicklefin redhorse, a fish found in only six Appalachian counties worldwide and being considered for the federal endangered species list. Triggered by the 1992 observations of Roanoke College’s Robert Jenkins, the sicklefin redhorse was only recently discovered to be a distinct species.  Learn more...

  • A biologist in snorkle gear holds up a large fish.
    Jay Mays pulls a golden redhorse from the fyke net. Oconaluftee River. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Sicklefin redhorse conservation

    December 29, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Every seat in the conference room was filled, with more chairs brought in for the overflow. In the room were aquatic biologists, geneticists, fish propagation experts, dam management experts – a host of biologists offering what they knew about the sicklefin redhorse. The sicklefin is no small fish – growing up to 25 inches long, and it’s found only in the western tip of North Carolina and a tiny portion of north Georgia, and it’s a candidate for inclusion on the federal endangered species list.  Learn more...

  • A NC biologist holding a sicklefin redhorse on a river bank in front of a hydroelectric dam.
    Information icon North Carolina biologist TR Russ holding an sicklefin redhorse. Photo by Mark Cantrell, USFWS.

    Rare fish recovery

    February 10, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Culminating a 20-year partnership with the state of Oregon, the Army Corps of Engineers, and private landowners, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently proposed removing the Oregon chub from the federal endangered species list. If it goes through, this would be the first fish delisted due to recovery. Fewer than 1,000 fish were known to exist when it was placed on the endangered species list.  Learn more...

  • A NC biologist holding a sicklefin redhorse on a river bank in front of a hydroelectric dam.
    Information icon North Carolina biologist TR Russ holding an sicklefin redhorse. Photo by Mark Cantrell, USFWS.

    Sicklefin redhorse conservation

    February 6, 2013 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature The Little Tennessee River runs wide and deep just below Emory Dam, outside Franklin North Carolina. In the late-morning sun on an April day, a jon boat plied the water back and forth. Protruding from the bow and dropping into the water was a pair of electrodes wired to an on-board generator. Perched in the bow was a biologist with a long-handled net waiting to scoop up fish stunned by the electric current flowing through the water.  Learn more...

  • A piece of heavy machinery deconstructs a small dam.
    A trackhoe begins the work of demolishing Dillsboro Dam. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Dillsboro Dam removal

    March 9, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. As a small crowd watched, a hydraulic hammer recently knocked away the first chunk of stone and concrete from Dillsboro Dam. Within weeks, the entire 12-foot high dam will be gone. It’s one of a series of Duke Energy hydropower facilities on western North Carolina’s Tuckasegee River. Federal law requires operators of private hydropower dams to address impacts to fish and wildlife.  Learn more...

  • Biologists collect bright yellow eggs from a half dozen brownish red fish.
    Fertilizing sicklefin redhorse eggs for captive rearing. Photo by Mark Cantrell, USFWS.

    Sicklefin redhorse conservation

    November 23, 2008 | 3 minute read

    Transcript On the bank of the Little Tennessee River, downstream from the town of Franklin, biologists squeeze tiny yellow eggs from a fish into a plastic bag. Unlike caviar, these eggs won’t be eaten, but rather trucked to a lab in Knoxville, Tenn., to join an effort to keep a rare fish off the endangered species list. The fish is a sicklefin redhorse, a recently discovered species found only in the western tip of North Carolina and a small bit of North Georgia.  Learn more...

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