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Tag: Refuges

The content below has been tagged with the term “Refuges.”

Articles

  • Stacy holding a king snake while a little girl touches its tail and smiles for the camera.
    Information icon Educational specialist Stacey Hayden with a scaled ambassador, King Tut, an eastern king snake. Visiting schools is just one of a stack of duties that Hayden handles for Clarks River and Green River National Wildlife Refuges in Kentucky. Photo courtesy of USFWS

    Animals, birds… and chupacabras

    July 30, 2021 | 5 minute read

    The caller had no doubt when Stacey Hayden picked up the phone at Clarks River National Wildlife Refuge. “I’m not sure if anyone has reported it yet, but I found the chupacabra,” the caller reported. “It’s on the side of the highway, dead.” A chupacabra, dear reader, is the stuff of legend – a beast that attacks animals and drinks their blood. The first reported sighting of a chupacabra occurred more than 20 years ago in Puerto Rico.  Learn more...

  • Group shot in front of the church building
    Information icon Johnnie Timmons, Darrell Dunham, Margaret Ann Timmons Finley, Mary McIntosh, Edgar Timmons, Tyrone Timmons and Fran Timmons. Their "Walk of Sorrow to Hope" on July 27 begins at the entrance to Harris Neck National Wildlife Refuge and ends at First African Baptist Church. It commemorates the 79th anniversary of the day the federal government took the land now comprising the refuge and used it for a World War II airfield. Photo by Mark Davis

    Walking for unity

    July 22, 2021 | 7 minute read

    Townsend, Georgia – The old church has always been the meeting place, where folks met to pay their respects to the past, discuss the present and plan for the future. If you’re one of the descendants of the Harris Neck residents who lived here before World War II, you know: This church is a touchstone. First African Baptist church is 153 years old. When the federal government in 1942 bought up thousands of acres in this coastal spot south of Savannah, a process called eminent domain, the people knew they couldn’t watch their church be destroyed.  Learn more...

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