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Tag: Red Wolf

The content below has been tagged with the term “Red Wolf.”

Faq

  • An inquisitive red wolf looks into the distance.
    Information icon Red wolf (Canis rufus). Photo by Valerie, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    Red wolf non-essential population management decision

    July 1, 2015 | 7 minute read

    What are the Service’s future plans for managing the Eastern North Carolina Non-Essential Experimental Red Wolf Population? We will continue to manage the Red Wolf Non-Essential Experimental Population (NEP) in accordance with our existing rule and regulation at 50 C.F.R. § 17.84©. In keeping with our rule, we will no longer release red wolves from our captive population into the recovery area, which is comprised of Beaufort, Dare, Hyde, Tyrrell and Washington counties.  Learn more...

News

  • A red wolf in a full run on a grassy field.
    Information icon A sprinting red wolf. Photo by Curtis Carley for USFWS.

    Service halts red wolf reintroductions pending examination of recovery program

    June 30, 2015 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced today it will suspend its reintroductions of red wolf into the wild while it gathers additional science and research into the feasibility of recovery for the species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The Service intends to complete its review by the end of 2015. Existing red wolves located in five eastern North Carolina counties will be managed in accordance with rules put in place in 1995 to govern this population, designated “non-essential, experimental” under the ESA.  Read the full story...

  • A grey colored wolf with bright yellow eyes walking low to the ground.
    Information icon Red wolf at Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium. Photo by Seth Bynum, PDZA.

    Service authorizes a private landowner to kill a red wolf

    June 25, 2015 | 2 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife provided a landowner in the Red Wolf non-essential experimental population (NEP) area with authorization to take a red wolf using lethal means. The landowner had previously received permission to capture wolves on his property. The landowner secured the services of a trapper who captured two wolves last fall. One wolf was returned to the Service and was subsequently released onto a nearby National Wildlife Refuge.  Read the full story...

  • A reddish grey wolf with yellow eyes.
    Information icon Captive red wolf at Species Survival Plan facility, Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium. Photo by B. Bartel, USFWS.

    Service receives red wolf program evaluation from WMI

    November 20, 2014 | 4 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today released a 171-page, peer-reviewed evaluation of its Red Wolf Recovery Program’s non-essential, experimental population in five Eastern North Carolina counties. Brief statements from Steve Williams, president of The Wildlife Management Institute; Leopoldo Miranda, assistant regional director for ecological services in the Service’s Southeast Region; and Gordon Myers, executive director of the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, are included below. The evaluation is one action among several that are part of a broad agreement between the Service and the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission put in place in late 2013.  Read the full story...

  • An adult red wolf walking stealthily in a caged enclosure at the zoo.
    Information icon Adult Red wolf. Photo by Brad McPhee, Defiance Zoo and Aquarium.

    Federal and state officials request assistance in investigation of gunshot red wolf

    October 17, 2014 | 5 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission are requesting assistance with an investigation involving the suspected illegal take of a radio-collared red wolf that was recently found dead.  Read the full story...

  • A male red wolf looks on as two pups play
    Information icon Red wolf (Canis rufus) with pups. Photo by Valerie, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    Fish and Wildlife Service extends date to complete red wolf evaluation to November 14

    October 7, 2014 | 1 minute read

    The deadline to complete a peer-reviewed evaluation of the Service’s Red Wolf Recovery Program and its non-essential, experimental population of red wolves in Eastern North Carolina has been extended to November 14, 2014. To take into account more than 47,600 comments the Service received from interested citizens and organizations over nearly a month along with the feedback from two public focus group sessions, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service provided an additional month to the Wildlife Management Institute (WMI) to complete its evaluation.  Read the full story...

  • An adult red wolf walking stealthily in a caged enclosure at the zoo.
    Information icon Adult Red wolf. Photo by Brad McPhee, Defiance Zoo and Aquarium.

    Fish and Wildlife Service extends comment period two weeks for red wolf recovery program evaluation

    September 12, 2014 | 1 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is extending by two weeks the comment period to receive information about the Red Wolf Recovery Program and its non-essential, experimental population of red wolves in Eastern North Carolina. The deadline to receive comments will be Friday, September 26. Interested individuals may continue to submit comments, concerns, or information to the following e-mail: redwolfreview@fws.gov. The Service is receiving messages submitted though the system is delaying their delivery leading in some cases to ‘undeliverable’ messages.  Read the full story...

  • Eastern North Carolina Red wolf population under review

    August 29, 2014 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service awarded a contract to conduct a review of the Eastern North Carolina non-essential, experimental red wolf population to the Wildlife Management Institute (WMI), of Cabot, Virginia. Founded in 1911, WMI is a private, non-profit, scientific and educational organization, dedicated to the conservation, enhancement, and professional management of North America’s wildlife and other natural resources. The evaluation will be completed in 60 days by October 10, 2014.  Read the full story...

  • A dead red wolf shows signs of decomposition in the understory.
    Information icon Gunshot red wolf found on private property north of the Town of Swanquarter, in western Hyde County, North Carolina, on Tuesday, November 19, 2013. Photo by USFWS.

    Federal officials request assistance in sixth gunshot red wolf reward up to $26,000

    November 21, 2013 | 4 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is requesting assistance with an investigation involving the suspected illegal take of a sixth red wolf in the last four weeks. In the latest death, the federally protected wolf’s body was recovered from private property north of the Town of Swanquarter, in western Hyde County, North Carolina, on Tuesday, November 19, 2013. The red wolf’s body had an apparent gunshot wound. Anyone with information that directly leads to an arrest, a criminal conviction, a civil penalty assessment, or forfeiture of property on the subject or subjects responsible for the suspected unlawful take of a red wolf may be eligible for a reward.  Read the full story...

Podcasts

  • Red wolves

    January 27, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Red wolves are the wolves of the south. They could once be found from Texas, across the south, and up the Atlantic coast. However, due to eradication efforts and habitat loss, they nearly became extinct. In a last-ditch effort to save the species, an attempt was made to capture all remaining wild red wolves. Of the 17 captured, 14 became the founders of a zoo-based breeding program.  Learn more...

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