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Tag: Red Cockaded Woodpecker

The content below has been tagged with the term “Red Cockaded Woodpecker.”

Articles

  • A biologist holds a long snake in front of a crowd of interns.

    Federal agencies helping landowners rebuild habitat for Louisiana pinesnake

    June 8, 2018 | 1 minute read Federal biologists from a number of agencies work together to recover the Louisiana pinesnake. Video by Louisiana Public Broadcasting Download the video.  Learn more...

    Steve Shively, Wildlife Biologist with Kisatchie National Forest shows off a Louisiana pinesnake. Photo courtesy of Louisiana Public Broadcasting.

  • A deep black snake coiled up on sandy soil with young longleaf pine seedlings in the background

    Snakes in a bag

    May 25, 2018 | 8 minute readAndalusia, Alabama — A gaggle of biologists, zookeepers, college students and government officials traipsed through the Deep South longleaf pine forest one recent, gorgeous spring morning carefully clutching white pillowcases. They were looking for holes. More specifically, gopher tortoise burrows into which they could deposit their precious cargo of Eastern indigo snakes, aka “Emperors of the Forest.” Southern Alabama including Conecuh National Forest. Map by Roy Hewitt, USFWS. The smooth, black, long — longest in North America — indigo snake is listed as federally threatened under the Endangered Species Act and in dire need of propagation and restoration to historical habitats. Learn more...

    An Eastern indigo snake on sandy soil associated with the longleaf pine ecosystem. Photo © Houston Chandler, the Orianne Society (Used with permission).

  • Buildings with boarded up doors and windows designed to mimic the Middle East.

    Marines and woodpeckers share the high ground

    March 22, 2018 | 8 minute readJacksonville, North Carolina — Above the distant din of 50-caliber machine gun fire and Cobra attack helicopters, John Hammond hears the unmistakable sound of a red-cockaded woodpecker. He is approaching Combat Town, where U.S. Marines routinely assault a mock Iraqi village at Camp Lejeune. A sign for Combat Town at Camp Lejeune. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS. It is an incongruous spot for an endangered bird to make its home – the middle of a war zone where artillery boom and tanks prowl. Learn more...

    Combat town at Camp Lejeune with a pine tree that is home to a red-cockaded woodpecker cluster. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

  • A small woodpecker perched on a pine tree.

    Steward of the land

    February 14, 2018 | 5 minute readIt started with quail, and then the woodpeckers upped the stakes. Cam Lanier owned one large quail-hunting plantation not far from his home in Lanett, Alabama, named Sehoy, and part of another next door, named Enon. But a timber company owned the other section of Enon Plantation. Cam Lanier bought Enon and Sehoy Plantations for quail hunting, but has added conservation of red-cockaded woodpeckers as a purpose. Photo courtesy of Cam Lanier. Learn more...

    In 2018, there were 38 active clusters of endangered red-cockaded woodpeckers on this property in Alabama, thriving there under a Safe Harbor Agreement. Composite photo by Mark Bailey.

  • A man standing in front of a large pine tree trunk

    Safe harbor for woodpeckers

    January 29, 2018 | 8 minute readNewton, Georgia – They’d probably spent 20 minutes touring the forest when the agent and potential buyer stopped. The client took it all in – the southwest Georgia sky, a blue that got only deeper as it reached to heaven; and, closer to earth, the longleaf pines, their brilliant green needles prickling that lovely sky. That was enough for Charley Tarver. He turned to the agent. Charley Tarver bought a plantation in southwest Georgia 18 years ago and has turned it into a habitat for the red cockaded woodpecker, or RCW. Learn more...

    Tarver, who grew up in Alabama, is a longleaf fan. His property, 200 miles south of Atlanta, is named Longleaf Plantation. Photo by Mark Davis, USFWS.

  • Three Native American men stand in front of a sign.

    Woven from the Landscape

    January 23, 2018 | 4 minute readBefore the United States was settled by Europeans, longleaf pine forests covered about 90 million acres of the Southeast. Most of these forests were logged for turpentine and lumber, and by 1975 they had been reduced to about 5 million acres. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is working with countless private landowners, state and federal agencies and conservation groups, to restore the glory of the longleaf. The motivation for many of these conservationists is to help the many at-risk and endangered birds and wildlife that thrive in longleaf forests from the red-cockaded woodpecker to the gopher tortoise. Learn more...

    Coushatta Tribe members (from left) Bertney Langley, Ernest Sickey and Gardner Rose show a sign that honors the habitat restoration partnership between the tribe and the Service. Photo courtesy of the Coushatta Tribe.

  • A woodpecker perched on a tree with a bug in its mouth

    The woodpecker’s journey

    November 20, 2017 | 9 minute readIt was getting dark. A light rain fell. Distant thunder rolled across the steamy, late-summer sky. The hunters were apprehensive. Their prey: endangered red-cockaded woodpeckers. Learn more...

    A red-cockaded woodpecker has dinner outside its nesting cavity. Photo by USFWS.

  • An entrance gate with a historical marker.

    South Carolina Coastal Program helps protect 11,000 acres in Berkeley County

    September 26, 2017 | 3 minute readThe 11,000-acre, privately-owned Oakland Club, located in Berkeley County, South Carolina, is now a permanently protected site for several state species of concern and federally protected species. These species include bobwhite quail, American chaffseed, Eastern diamondback rattlesnakes, red-cockaded woodpeckers, swallow-tailed kites, Swainson’s warblers, and Southern hognose snakes. Once home to Revolutionary War hero General Francis Marion, the Oakland Club parallels the Santee River and lies between the Francis Marion National Forest and the Santee National Wildlife Refuge. Learn more...

    Entry road to Revolutionary War hero General Francis Marion’s grave and Oakland Club. Photo by Jason Ayers, USFWS.

News

  • A small woodpecker perched on a pine tree.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of 42 southeastern species

    August 3, 2018 | 7 minute readThe red-cockaded woodpecker is one of 42 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife and plants that will get updated five-year status reviews conducted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in the months ahead. They are all found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before October 5, 2018. These five-year reviews, required by the Endangered Species Act (ESA) will ensure listing classifications under the ESA are accurate and recommend changes in status where appropriate based on the latest science and analysis. Read the full story...

    In 2018, there were 38 active clusters of endangered red-cockaded woodpeckers on this property in Alabama, thriving there under a Safe Harbor Agreement. Composite photo by Mark Bailey.

  • Red-cockaded woodpecker flying from its nest.

    Base recognized for conservation work

    May 30, 2018 | 4 minute readCamp Blanding, flush with federally endangered red-cockaded woodpeckers, donates juvenile birds to other wildlife areas across the South. Nearly two-thirds of the National Guard base in Northeast Florida is prime habitat for at-risk gopher tortoises too. More than 10,000 acres of pine and scrub is carefully burned each year to benefit under-threat flora and fauna as well as conservation-friendly longleaf pines. And the joint military base is a critical piece in the creation of a wildlife corridor that connects central Florida to southeast Georgia. Read the full story...

    Red-cockaded woodpecker. Photo by Martjan Lammertink, U.S. Forest Service.

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