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Tag: Red Cockaded Woodpecker

The content below has been tagged with the term “Red Cockaded Woodpecker.”

Articles

  • A pine forest with trees snapped in half by high winds and a bent speed limit sign

    After Hurricane Michael

    November 29, 2018 | 6 minute readCamilla, Georgia — Hurricane Michael barreled across prime Southern timber territory, damaging five million acres of pines and hardwoods and destroying nearly $1.7 billion worth of marketable trees. Habitat for many of the region’s at-risk species — red-cockaded woodpeckers, gopher tortoises, eastern indigo snakes — was sundered. Red-cockaded woodpecker in flight. Photo by Martjan Lammertink, U.S. Forest Service. Now, six weeks after Michael killed more than 45 people in Florida, Georgia, North Carolina and Virginia, forest owners salvage timber, clear stands and pray for a market rebound. Learn more...

    Tyndall Air Force Base pine forests were scissored by Hurricane Michael. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

  • Biologist assess damage to a forest after a hurricane

    Test flight for red-cockaded woodpeckers

    November 21, 2018 | 3 minute readJoshua Havird lifted his quadcopter drone from its case as if he was handling a carton of eggs. The assistant fire management officer from St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge was on hand at the neighboring Apalachicola National Forest in the wake of Hurricane Michael. The Apalachicola, the only national forest on Florida’s panhandle and about 20 miles to the east of Mexico Beach, was hit hard on its western flank. Learn more...

    Joshua Havird (blue shirt) and Joel Casto (plaid shirt) assess RCW clusters. Photo by Michael Keys, USFS.

  • A deep red, wooden baseball bat commemorating the opening of Fayetteville’s new baseball stadium

    Endangered woodpecker is baseball’s newest mascot

    November 13, 2018 | 3 minute readMinor League Baseball has a new mascot, a new team: the Fayetteville Woodpeckers. The team, based in Fayetteville, North Carolina, has adopted the endangered red-cockaded woodpecker to adorn team caps, shirts and other items. Note the bat; that bird’s been busy. Photo courtesy of the Fayetteville Woodpeckers. Take a look at the all-new mascot for the all-new Fayetteville Woodpeckers Minor League Baseball team. Note the fierce gleam in the eye, topped by a scarlet crest. Learn more...

    A baseball bat commemorating the City of Fayetteville, North Carolina’s bew baseball stadium groundbreaking - August 21, 2017. Photo by the City of Fayetteville.

  • A brown sign bent in half by high winds that reads St Vincent NWR

    Survivors of the storm

    October 22, 2018 | 6 minute readBradley Smith seeks evidence that the red wolves survived Hurricane Michael off St. Vincent NWR. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS. Apalachicola, Florida — Bradley Smith stood tall on the bow of the SeaArk 21-footer with a VHF antenna held high. It was quiet, too quiet. It had been six days since Hurricane Michael devastated the Panhandle and Smith was listening for signs of life on St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge. Learn more...

    The sand-clogged dock with St. Vincent NWR in the background. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

  • A drum-shapped buoy washed ashore with plam trees and a lighthouse in the distance

    Service makes headway in Hurricane Michael repairs

    October 17, 2018 | 5 minute readSt. Marks, Florida — The images of Hurricane Michael’s rampage across the Panhandle have been seared, by now, into the nation’s collective consciousness: the roofless homes; the mountains of debris; the long lines of anguished people; and the miles of chopped-in-half trees. The worst of the damage came courtesy of winds nearing 155 mph. Michael’s counter-clockwise punch, though, pushed water from the Gulf of Mexico deep inland, swamping small towns, barrier islands and wildlife refuges, particularly along Michael’s eastern edge. Learn more...

    A buoy washed ashore by Hurricane Michael at St. Marks NWR.

  • A biologist holds a long snake in front of a crowd of interns.

    Federal agencies helping landowners rebuild habitat for Louisiana pinesnake

    June 8, 2018 | 1 minute read Federal biologists from a number of agencies work together to recover the Louisiana pinesnake. Video by Louisiana Public Broadcasting Download the video.  Learn more...

    Steve Shively, Wildlife Biologist with Kisatchie National Forest shows off a Louisiana pinesnake. Photo courtesy of Louisiana Public Broadcasting.

  • A deep black snake coiled up on sandy soil with young longleaf pine seedlings in the background

    Snakes in a bag

    May 25, 2018 | 8 minute readAndalusia, Alabama — A gaggle of biologists, zookeepers, college students and government officials traipsed through the Deep South longleaf pine forest one recent, gorgeous spring morning carefully clutching white pillowcases. They were looking for holes. More specifically, gopher tortoise burrows into which they could deposit their precious cargo of Eastern indigo snakes, aka “Emperors of the Forest.” Southern Alabama including Conecuh National Forest. Map by Roy Hewitt, USFWS. The smooth, black, long — longest in North America — indigo snake is listed as federally threatened under the Endangered Species Act and in dire need of propagation and restoration to historical habitats. Learn more...

    An Eastern indigo snake on sandy soil associated with the longleaf pine ecosystem. Photo © Houston Chandler, the Orianne Society (Used with permission).

  • Buildings with boarded up doors and windows designed to mimic the Middle East.

    Marines and woodpeckers share the high ground

    March 22, 2018 | 8 minute readJacksonville, North Carolina — Above the distant din of 50-caliber machine gun fire and Cobra attack helicopters, John Hammond hears the unmistakable sound of a red-cockaded woodpecker. He is approaching Combat Town, where U.S. Marines routinely assault a mock Iraqi village at Camp Lejeune. A sign for Combat Town at Camp Lejeune. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS. It is an incongruous spot for an endangered bird to make its home – the middle of a war zone where artillery boom and tanks prowl. Learn more...

    Combat town at Camp Lejeune with a pine tree that is home to a red-cockaded woodpecker cluster. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

News

  • A small woodpecker perched on a pine tree.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of 42 southeastern species

    August 3, 2018 | 7 minute readThe red-cockaded woodpecker is one of 42 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife and plants that will get updated five-year status reviews conducted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in the months ahead. They are all found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before October 5, 2018. These five-year reviews, required by the Endangered Species Act (ESA) will ensure listing classifications under the ESA are accurate and recommend changes in status where appropriate based on the latest science and analysis. Read the full story...

    In 2018, there were 38 active clusters of endangered red-cockaded woodpeckers on this property in Alabama, thriving there under a Safe Harbor Agreement. Composite photo by Mark Bailey.

  • Red-cockaded woodpecker flying from its nest.

    Base recognized for conservation work

    May 30, 2018 | 4 minute readCamp Blanding, flush with federally endangered red-cockaded woodpeckers, donates juvenile birds to other wildlife areas across the South. Nearly two-thirds of the National Guard base in Northeast Florida is prime habitat for at-risk gopher tortoises too. More than 10,000 acres of pine and scrub is carefully burned each year to benefit under-threat flora and fauna as well as conservation-friendly longleaf pines. And the joint military base is a critical piece in the creation of a wildlife corridor that connects central Florida to southeast Georgia. Read the full story...

    Red-cockaded woodpecker. Photo by Martjan Lammertink, U.S. Forest Service.

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