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Tag: Recreation

The content below has been tagged with the term “Recreation.”

Articles

  • A marsh at low tide exposes a mud flat with sparse pine trees in the distance.
    Information icon Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Nanciann Regalado, USFWS.

    Coastal Alabama refuge adds land

    April 26, 2019 | 3 minute read

    A jewel of an ecosystem just grew by more than 350 football fields, thanks to a partnership between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) and several partners. The land in question: the Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge, a roughly 7,000-acre tract near Gulf Shores, Alabama. It’s called the Little Point Clear Unit — two parcels comprising 470 acres, enough land to accommodate 355 football games. It became a formal part of the refuge April 26.  Learn more...

  • An open gate surrounded by live oaks covered in Spanish moss.
    Information icon Altama Plantation. Photo by Nicole Vidal, USFWS.

    A gem for hunters and hikers alike

    July 12, 2017 | 4 minute read

    Brunswick, Georgia – Altama Plantation is perhaps the most critical, and intriguing, piece of property along the entire Altamaha River corridor. It was here in the early 1800s that plantation owner James Hamilton Couper introduced the Dutch system of tidal floodgates to grow rice. He planted sugar cane and built a refinery whose red-brick remains still stand. Couper, a noted scientist, also recorded the first eastern indigo snake, a threatened species which bears his name (Drymarchon couperi).  Learn more...

  • A gentlman with gray hair poses for the camera with a smile and his arms crossed.
    Information icon Mr. Dink NeSmith has a special relationship with the Altamaha River. Photo by Nicole Vidal, USFWS.

    Local landowner fights for the Altamaha

    July 12, 2017 | 3 minute read

    Jesup, Georgia – “Well now, welcome to the swamp.” Dink NeSmith stands astride a weathered wooden dock on Sandy Lake, a meandering offshoot of the Altamaha River. To some, the oxbow lake is nothing but a muddy, buggy, alligator-friendly bog. To NeSmith, it’s an open-air cathedral in all its natural “majesty.” “God put it here a long time ago,” he preached, “and it’s on loan to my family and me and we want to do our part to make sure it remains a clean, safe environment for our great, great, great, great grandchildren.  Learn more...

  • The sun sets over a lush green marsh cut in half by a calm brackish channel.
    Information icon Salt marsh along the Altamaha River. Photo by Nicole Vidal, USFWS.

    Many partners work together to protect “the Amazon of the South” for generations to come

    July 12, 2017 | 13 minute read

    It meanders 137 miles through the wild heart of Georgia, a blackwater beauty that nourishes longleaf pine forests, cypress swamps, saltwater estuaries and the barrier islands that protect the Atlantic coast and migratory birds alike.  Learn more...

  • A forrested stream with rocky shores.
    Information icon Raccoon Creek. Photo by Brett Albanese, Georgia DNR.

    A wildlife gem, in the shadow of a booming Atlanta

    June 7, 2017 | 8 minute read

    Braswell, Georgia — It was 1946, a cold night in the Blue Ridge mountains, and the six frustrated deer hunters hunkered down in a glade as the wind howled. Two days spent scrambling over the hills had flushed but one doe. The annual hunt was no longer worth the long drive from Paulding County outside Atlanta. “What I’m figuring,” said E.F. Corley, a farmer, sawmiller, truck driver and ordained Baptist minister, “is stocking deer in the hills behind home.  Learn more...

Charleston

  • A kayaker navigates her boat through a flooded forest.
    Information icon Kayaking through Sparkleberry Swamp. Photo by USFWS.

    Outdoor recreation

    Our nation has one of the world’s largest networks of protected public lands set aside for the enjoyment of the American people. This vast network supports a healthy outdoor recreation industry, providing millions of jobs across the U.S. and generating billions of dollars for the economy. These jobs and revenue in turn help support local communities and fund conservation efforts. So whether you are hunting, fishing, or hiking, you’re not just renewing your spirit and improving your health, you’re also contributing to the future of conserving and enhancing our natural heritage for future generations.  Learn more...

News

  • States receive more than $1 billion for recreation access, conservation

    April 1, 2019 | 2 minute read

    Outdoor recreationists who hunt, shoot, fish and boat are providing more than $1 billion this year to support increased outdoor access and wildlife habitat conservation across the United States. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is distributing the funds to all 50 states and U.S. territories today. The funds are generated through excise taxes on hunting, shooting and fishing equipment and boat fuel. Authorized by Congress through the Pittman-Robertson Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Act and Dingell-Johnson/Wallop-Breaux Federal Aid in Sport Fish Restoration Act, these dollars support critical state conservation and outdoor recreation projects.  Read the full story...

  • A dozen large birds on the edge of a mangrove island.
    Information icon Brown pelican chicks on mangrove island. Photo by Tom MacKenzie, USFWS.

    How to manage 45 important coastal species in the face of environmental changes

    October 3, 2017 | 3 minute read

    Salt marshes, mangrove forests, and barrier beaches are home to a diversity of wildlife species, and when these coastal ecosystems are intact and functional, they benefit communities as well as wildlife.  Read the full story...

Podcasts

  • Six people wearing life preservers on a boat.
    People enjoying a boat. Photo by Greg Workman, FWC.

    Latest survey of wildlife-based recreation

    December 10, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Every five years the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service conducts a national survey providing a look at the level of participation and spending on wildlife-based recreation, such as hunting, fishing, and wildlife watching. It’s done at the request of all the state fish and wildlife agencies, and the actual questioning is done by the U.S. Census bureau, who spoke with more than 48,000 households in 2011.  Learn more...

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