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Tag: Recovery

The content below has been tagged with the term “Recovery.”

Articles

  • A biologist holds a long snake in front of a crowd of interns.
    Information icon Steve Shively, Wildlife Biologist with Kisatchie National Forest shows off a Louisiana pinesnake. Photo courtesy of Louisiana Public Broadcasting.

    Federal agencies helping landowners rebuild habitat for Louisiana pinesnake

    June 8, 2018 | 1 minute read

    Federal biologists from a number of agencies work together to recover the Louisiana pinesnake. Video by Louisiana Public Broadcasting Download the video.  Learn more...

  • A deep black snake coiled up on sandy soil with young longleaf pine seedlings in the background
    Information icon An Eastern indigo snake on sandy soil associated with the longleaf pine ecosystem. Photo © Houston Chandler, the Orianne Society (Used with permission).

    Snakes in a bag

    May 25, 2018 | 8 minute read

    Andalusia, Alabama — A gaggle of biologists, zookeepers, college students and government officials traipsed through the Deep South longleaf pine forest one recent, gorgeous spring morning carefully clutching white pillowcases. They were looking for holes. More specifically, gopher tortoise burrows into which they could deposit their precious cargo of Eastern indigo snakes, aka “Emperors of the Forest.” Southern Alabama including Conecuh National Forest. Map by Roy Hewitt, USFWS.  Learn more...

  • A woman wearing a warm hat preparing to plant a tiny spruce tree seedling.
    Information icon Sue Cameron plants a red spruce at Whigg Meadow in Tennessee. Photo by Garry Peeples, USFWS.

    Women lead the effort on Appalachian mountain-top forests

    May 24, 2018 | 8 minute read

    The story of an ambitious effort to restore red spruce to the Southern Appalachians spearheaded by four women brought together by a commitment to the highest peaks east of the Mississippi River.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A small reddish-brown wolf with a large collar around its neck
    Information icon Red wolf (Canis rufus) with radio collar. Photo by Ryan Nordsven, USFWS.

    Red wolf proposed 10j rule and draft environment assessment announcement

    June 27, 2018 | 7 minute read

    What is a red wolf? The red wolf is a native North American canid, a family that includes wolves, jackals, foxes, coyotes and the domestic dog. Adult red wolves can weigh 53-84 pounds and are about four feet from the tip of the nose to the tip of the tail. Is the red wolf a true species? The most recent scientific publications continue to provide conflicting interpretations and support for various recommendations on the correct taxonomic status, the U.  Learn more...

News

  • A male red wolf looks on as two pups play
    Information icon Red wolf (Canis rufus) with pups. Photo by Valerie, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    Service reopens comment period on new management rule for red wolves in North Carolina

    August 10, 2018 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is reopening the public comment period on a proposed rule to replace the existing regulations governing the nonessential experimental population of the red wolf under section 10(j) of the Endangered Species Act (ESA). On June 28, 2018, the Service published in the Federal Register a proposed rule that would remove management efforts from existing private lands and instead focus continuing efforts on certain public lands in Hyde and Dare counties, North Carolina.  Read the full story...

  • A small woodpecker perched on a pine tree.
    Information icon In 2018, there were 38 active clusters of endangered red-cockaded woodpeckers on this property in Alabama, thriving there under a Safe Harbor Agreement. Composite photo by Mark Bailey.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of 42 southeastern species

    August 3, 2018 | 7 minute read

    The red-cockaded woodpecker is one of 42 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife and plants that will get updated five-year status reviews conducted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in the months ahead. They are all found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before October 5, 2018. These five-year reviews, required by the Endangered Species Act (ESA) will ensure listing classifications under the ESA are accurate and recommend changes in status where appropriate based on the latest science and analysis.  Read the full story...

  • Draft recovery plan for endangered Puerto Rican frog available

    July 6, 2018 | 2 minute read

    “Kee, kee,” a male coquí llanero softly sings from dusk to dawn in a Puerto Rican wetland. Hearing its high-pitched call is rare because the tiny frog is only found in one freshwater wetland in the municipality of Toa Baja, Puerto Rico. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has prepared a draft recovery plan outlining actions to save this dime-sized frog, which has been federally listed as endangered since October 2012.  Read the full story...

  • A light brown fish with bright orange markings on the tops of its fins.
    Information icon Yellowcheek darter. Photo by J.R. Shute, Conservation Fisheries, Inc.

    Recovery plan available for endangered yellowcheek darter

    July 5, 2018 | 2 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is announcing the availability of the final recovery plan for the yellowcheek darter, a fish listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The yellowcheek darter is a small fish native to the Little Red River basin in Arkansas. It is found in headwater streams with clear water, permanent flow, moderate to strong riffles, and gravel, rubble, and boulder substrates. Historically, the yellowcheek darter has been found in the Little Red River and its four major forks (Devils, Middle, South, and Archey) in Cleburne, Searcy, Stone, and Van Buren counties.  Read the full story...

  • A red wolf in a full run on a grassy field.
    Information icon A sprinting red wolf. Photo by Curtis Carley for USFWS.

    Service proposes new management rule for non-essential, experimental population of red wolves in North Carolina

    June 27, 2018 | 3 minute read

    More than 30 years ago, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and its partners began efforts to reintroduce the endangered red wolf into the wild in North Carolina. While many of the captive-bred wolves adapted well to a wild environment, the program faced unforeseen challenges, including hybridization of wolves with coyotes and conflicts with humans. After initially increasing, the population plateaued and then declined. Today, only approximately 35 wild wolves remain, with a further 200-plus wolves in captive breeding facilities.  Read the full story...

  • Red-cockaded woodpecker flying from its nest.
    Red-cockaded woodpecker. Photo by Martjan Lammertink, U.S. Forest Service.

    Base recognized for conservation work

    May 30, 2018 | 4 minute read

    Camp Blanding, flush with federally endangered red-cockaded woodpeckers, donates juvenile birds to other wildlife areas across the South. Nearly two-thirds of the National Guard base in Northeast Florida is prime habitat for at-risk gopher tortoises too. More than 10,000 acres of pine and scrub is carefully burned each year to benefit under-threat flora and fauna as well as conservation-friendly longleaf pines. And the joint military base is a critical piece in the creation of a wildlife corridor that connects central Florida to southeast Georgia.  Read the full story...

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