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Tag: Recovery

The content below has been tagged with the term “Recovery.”

Articles

  • Pelicans dot an island landscape shot from above with a single large pelican flying near the elevated camera.
    Information icon A brown pelican soars over others on Queen Bess Island, Louisiana. Photo by USFWS.

    Island restoration project and partnerships playing key role in future of the brown pelican

    June 14, 2019 | 3 minute read

    It may not be widely known that Louisiana, the Pelican State, had lost for almost a decade all of its namesake brown pelicans. In the early 1900’s Louisiana’s brown pelican population was estimated at 50,000 to 80,000. The widespread use of the insecticide DDT, however, took a huge toll on many bird species, including the brown pelican. By 1963, the bird was no longer found anywhere in the state. Today, the birds are back and their numbers around the state are staying steady.  Learn more...

  • Four manatees and a school of fish assemble under crystal clear water.
    Information icon Manatees at Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge in Florida. Photo by David Hinkel.

    Manatees hanging out in mitigation feature in Southwest Florida

    May 15, 2019 | 3 minute read

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologists monitoring the progress of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) were excited to hear that up to 20 Florida manatees used the manatee mitigation feature south of Port of the Islands marina in Collier County, Florida, in January and February. Kim Dryden, biologist. Photo by USFWS. That manatee mitigation feature is a refugium built by the South Florida Water Management District a couple of years ago.  Learn more...

  • A sign explains the hirstorical significance of the Florida torreya with a white house in the background.
    Information icon The Gregory House with propped-up torreya. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    Saving the Florida torreya

    April 22, 2019 | 8 minute read

    Bristol, Florida — The Florida torreya was one of the world’s most endangered trees even before Hurricane Michael savaged the remaining wild specimens along the Apalachicola River with 100-plus mph winds in October 2018. It was also one of the most controversial trees, Exhibit A in a roiling debate over how, and where, to keep alive species facing extinction. More than 650,000 torreyas once lined the ridgelines or hugged the ravines near the Apalachicola and Flint rivers.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A black beetle with orange markings on its back, the ends of its antenae and its fore legs
    Information icon American burying beetle. Photo by Mark Dumont, CC BY-NC 2.0.

    American burying beetle Endangered Species Act downlisting proposal and 4(d) rule

    May 1, 2019 | 13 minute read

    What is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposing? The Service is proposing to downlist the American burying beetle from endangered to threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). This proposal is based on a thorough review of the best available science and information, including the recently completed Species Status Assessment (SSA), indicating the beetle is not presently in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range.  Learn more...

News

  • A green plant with serrated edges and a brown stem with a cylindrical orange flower.
    Information icon *Gesneria pauciflora* (no common name). Photo by Jan Paul Zegarra, USFWS.

    Service announces recovery plan revisions for 53 species, to assist in measuring progress and addressing threats

    August 5, 2019 | 5 minute read

    As part of an agency-wide effort to advance the recovery of our nation’s most imperiled species, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has made publicly available draft revisions for 28 Endangered Species Act (ESA) recovery plans that provide a recovery roadmap for 53 federally protected species. This batch of recovery plan revisions is part of the Department of the Interior’s Agency Priority Performance Goals, which call for all recovery plans to include quantitative criteria on what constitutes recovery, by September 2019.  Read the full story...

  • A long stemmed plant with bright yellow flowers.
    Information icon Shorts bladderpod. Photo by John MacGregor, Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.

    Draft recovery plan for Short’s bladderpod available

    July 16, 2019 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is releasing a draft recovery plan for the Short’s bladderpod, a bright yellow flowering plant in the mustard family. The plant, which stands about two feet tall, is only found in Indiana, Kentucky, and Tennessee. It exists near rivers on steep and rocky wooded slopes. Federally listed as endangered on August 1, 2014, the plant is state-listed in each of the three states where it exists.  Read the full story...

  • A small, straw-yellow colored fish with brown markings
    Information icon Photo by Jeremy Shute, Conservation Fisheries, Inc.

    Recovery plan available for endangered Cumberland darter

    June 5, 2019 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is announcing the availability of the recovery plan for the Cumberland darter, a fish listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The darter is found in the upper Cumberland River drainage, above Cumberland Falls, in southeastern Kentucky and north central Tennessee. Its recovery plan describes actions necessary for its recovery, establishes criteria for delisting it, and estimates the time and cost for implementing necessary recovery actions.  Read the full story...

  • An orange mussel partially covered by silt and algae
    Information icon Neosho mucket. Photo by Kevin Mouser, , on iNaturalist.

    Final reocvery plan for endangered mussel available

    May 3, 2019 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) announces the availability of the final recovery plan for the Neosho mucket, a federally endangered mussel that grows up to five inches long. Neosho muckets historically occurred in at least 17 streams within the Illinois, Neosho, and Verdigris River basins covering four states (Arkansas, Kansas, Oklahoma, and Missouri). It is threatened primarily by factors associated with the destruction or modification of its habitat.  Read the full story...

  • A black beetle with orange markings on its back, the ends of its antenae and its fore legs
    Information icon American burying beetle. Photo by Mark Dumont, CC BY-NC 2.0.

    Conservation partnerships lead to proposed downlisting of American burying beetle

    May 1, 2019 | 5 minute read

    The American burying beetle, one of nature’s most unique creatures, appears to be more plentiful, thanks in part to the efforts of a wide array of partners across its range. Following the beetle’s listing in 1989 as endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and stakeholders implemented conservation and recovery efforts, and now the Service is proposing to downlist it from endangered to threatened.  Read the full story...

  • A biologist dressed for cold weather holds an acient-looking fish on a boat at sea
    Information icon Biologist Albert Spells with Atlantic sturgeon. Photo by USFWS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status review of Atlantic sturgeon (Gulf subspecies)

    April 11, 2019 | 2 minute read

    As part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries will jointly conduct a five-year status review of the Atlantic sturgeon (Gulf subspecies). This fish, federally listed as threatened, is found along the coasts and in the rivers of Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning the Atlantic sturgeon on or before June 10, 2019.  Read the full story...

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