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Tag: Recovery

The content below has been tagged with the term “Recovery.”

Articles

  • Two large white birds flying low over a wetland coming in for a landing with a Service biologist in the foreground
    Information icon Two endangered whooping cranes coming in for a landing. Photo by Greg Pope.

    “Journey of the Whooping Crane” follows efforts to save a rare, endangered bird

    November 30, 2018 | 2 minute read

    In 1940, only about 20 whooping cranes were known to exist. Today, thanks to the diligence of many partners working together in the United States and Canada, there are more than 850 cranes in North America and the population continues to increase slowly and steadily. The iconic bird is one of the success stories of the Endangered Species Act (ESA). But it remains one of the rarest animals in the world.  Learn more...

  • An outstretched hand holding a dozen mussels marked with id numbers
    Information icon Carolina heelsplitters ready to be stocked. Photo by FWS.

    Private landowners step up to save the Carolina Heelsplitter

    September 28, 2018 | 2 minute read

    Ellison McDow and his grandfather Donnie Evans displaying Carolina heelsplitters that will soon be released on Mr. Evan’s property. Photo by FWS. South Carolina, like many states in the Southeast Region, is mostly made up of private lands. Therefore, these lands and their owners are crucial to any effort aimed at recovery of endangered species. Last fall, a number of private entities voluntarily contributed to the ongoing recovery efforts for the critically endangered Carolina heelsplitter, a freshwater mussel.  Learn more...

  • A man with a beard looks closely at an insect with a magnifying glass
    Information icon Zoologist David Withers of the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation examines a Sequatchie caddisfly, an insect that lives in only a very few spots in Tennessee. Photo by Phil Kloer, USFWS.

    Protecting the rare

    September 18, 2018 | 5 minute read

    Sequatchie Cave State Natural Area, Tennessee — A royal snail is about the size of a match head. You could be standing in a few inches of water with lots of royal snails at your feet, look down, and not even see them. The royal snail, found only in one county in Tennessee, was declared in endangered in 1994. Photo by David Withers, Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A small reddish-brown wolf with a large collar around its neck
    Information icon Red wolf (Canis rufus) with radio collar. Photo by Ryan Nordsven, USFWS.

    Red wolf recovery program evaluation

    September 19, 2018 | 3 minute read

    How is the Service going to use the evaluation findings? The evaluation completed by the Wildlife Management Institute is currently being used to inform a broader internal agency evaluation regarding the future of the non-­essential experimental population in Eastern North Carolina. Program evaluations are a normal practice with any recovery program to ensure optimal effectiveness. It is part of an internal review process now underway. We will be consulting with key agency personnel as well as the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission throughout the process, however, the final decision will be made by the Service’s Southeast Regional Director.  Learn more...

  • A male red wolf looks on as two pups play
    Information icon Red wolf (Canis rufus) with pups. Photo by Valerie, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    Red wolf recovery program review

    September 19, 2018 | 17 minute read

    Why did the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) conduct a review for the Red Wolf Recovery Program? The Service recognized a need to gather additional science and research to better guide recovery of the endangered red wolf under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). To that end, the Service initiated a two-year, two-step review of the red wolf recovery program including the non-essential, experimental population in northeastern North Carolina. The review began in 2014 with a peer-reviewed program assessment by the Wildlife Management Institute.  Learn more...

News

  • An inquisitive red wolf looks into the distance.
    Information icon Red wolf (Canis rufus). Photo by Valerie, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    Service extends red wolf review in North Carolina

    November 29, 2018 | 1 minute read

    In light of a federal court ruling issued earlier this month in the Eastern District of North Carolina, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is extending its review of a proposed rule to adapt its management of red wolves in the state. The additional review time will provide the Service the opportunity to fully evaluate the implications of the court decision.  Read the full story...

  • A small semi-transluscent catfish in an aquarium.
    Information icon Chucky madtom. Photo by J.R. Shute, Conservation Fisheries, Inc.

    Recovery plan for endangered Chucky madtom available

    September 19, 2018 | 3 minute read

    The final recovery plan for the Chucky madtom, a federally listed endangered small catfish, is now available. The Chucky madtom lives in a single tributary of the Nolichucky River in East Tennessee. Threats to the species include loss of habitat, small population size, inability to offset mortality with natural reproduction, and their resulting vulnerability to natural or human-induced catastrophic events, such as droughts and pollution. This plan describes actions considered necessary for the recovery of this fish, establishes criteria for delisting the species, and estimates the time and cost for implementing the measures needed.  Read the full story...

  • A patterned black and gray snake blends in to the strewn, dark pine needles on the forest floor.
    Louisiana pinesnake. Photo by Michael Sealy, USFWS.

    Notice of Availability of a draft environmental assessment for a proposed rule under section 4(d) of the Endangered Species Act for the Louisiana pinesnake

    September 18, 2018 | 1 minute read

    Comments Comments will be accepted until October 18, 2018. Addresses You may submit comments, or requests for or more information, by any of the following methods: Email: Lafayette@fws.gov. Include “Louisiana Pinesnake EA” in the subject line Fax: [ATTN: Joseph Ranson], 337-291-3139 U.S. Mail: 646 Cajundome Blvd, Suite 400, Lafayette, LA 70506 In-person drop-off, viewing, or pickup: Call 337-291-3100 to make an appointment (necessary for view/pickup only) during regular business hours at 646 Cajundome Blvd, Suite 400, Lafayette, LA, 70506 In person viewing: U.  Read the full story...

  • Draft recovery plan for endangered Neosho mucket available

    August 16, 2018 | 2 minute read

    The Neosho mucket is a freshwater mussel that grows up to five inches long, which is large for a mussel, and is found in river basins in Arkansas, Kansas, Oklahoma and Missouri. It was listed as an endangered species in 2013 under the Endangered Species Act. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) has been working closely with private landowners and communities, state and federal agencies, universities, and conservation institutes, to survey for individuals and protect and restore the mussel’s habitat.  Read the full story...

  • A male red wolf looks on as two pups play
    Information icon Red wolf (Canis rufus) with pups. Photo by Valerie, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    Service reopens comment period on new management rule for red wolves in North Carolina

    August 10, 2018 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is reopening the public comment period on a proposed rule to replace the existing regulations governing the nonessential experimental population of the red wolf under section 10(j) of the Endangered Species Act (ESA). On June 28, 2018, the Service published in the Federal Register a proposed rule that would remove management efforts from existing private lands and instead focus continuing efforts on certain public lands in Hyde and Dare counties, North Carolina.  Read the full story...

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