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Tag: Recovery

The content below has been tagged with the term “Recovery.”

Articles

  • A sign explains the hirstorical significance of the Florida torreya with a white house in the background.
    Information icon The Gregory House with propped-up torreya. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    Saving the Florida torreya

    April 22, 2019 | 8 minute read

    Bristol, Florida — The Florida torreya was one of the world’s most endangered trees even before Hurricane Michael savaged the remaining wild specimens along the Apalachicola River with 100-plus mph winds in October 2018. It was also one of the most controversial trees, Exhibit A in a roiling debate over how, and where, to keep alive species facing extinction. More than 650,000 torreyas once lined the ridgelines or hugged the ravines near the Apalachicola and Flint rivers.  Learn more...

  • A bright green irrodescent fish in a small blue net.
    Information icon Barrens topminnows are small, colorful fish that live only in a few springs and creeks in central Tennessee. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed listing the fish as endangered. Photo by Emily Granstaff, USFWS.

    A boost in the Barrens

    February 27, 2019 | 3 minute read

    Barrens topminnows are small, colorful fish about four inches long, and the males are particularly showy during spawning season. Barrens darters are even smaller, and they are believed to be one of the rarest fish in North America. Cumberland pigtoes are mussels with mahogany shells and peach interiors. The fish and mussels are struggling to survive in the only place they live: the creeks and watersheds in a little part of Tennessee called the Barrens, midway between Nashville and Chattanooga.  Learn more...

  • Water topples over a 25ft tall dam
    Information icon Hoosier Dam stood 25 feet tall and 235 feet across the Rocky River in Chatham County. It blocked the endangered Cape Fear shiner from reaching habitat upstream from 1922 until October 2018. Photo by Emily Wells, USFWS.

    North Carolina dam removal helps Rocky River and the endangered fish that lives there

    December 6, 2018 | 4 minute read

    The Cape Fear shiner, a federally protected North American minnow found only in central North Carolina, battles to survive with only one stronghold remaining in the lower reaches of the Rocky and Deep Rivers of North Carolina’s Upper Cape Fear River Basin. Many issues have piled up against this little fish, but a massive dam of reinforced concrete, averaging 25 feet tall and 235 feet across stood out, until recently, as a monumental obstacle to the species’ recovery.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A black beetle with orange markings on its back, the ends of its antenae and its fore legs
    Information icon American burying beetle. Photo by Mark Dumont, CC BY-NC 2.0.

    American burying beetle Endangered Species Act downlisting proposal and 4(d) rule

    May 1, 2019 | 13 minute read

    What is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposing? The Service is proposing to downlist the American burying beetle from endangered to threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). This proposal is based on a thorough review of the best available science and information, including the recently completed Species Status Assessment (SSA), indicating the beetle is not presently in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range.  Learn more...

News

  • An orange mussel partially covered by silt and algae
    Information icon Neosho mucket. Photo by Kevin Mouser, , on iNaturalist.

    Final reocvery plan for endangered mussel available

    May 3, 2019 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) announces the availability of the final recovery plan for the Neosho mucket, a federally endangered mussel that grows up to five inches long. Neosho muckets historically occurred in at least 17 streams within the Illinois, Neosho, and Verdigris River basins covering four states (Arkansas, Kansas, Oklahoma, and Missouri). It is threatened primarily by factors associated with the destruction or modification of its habitat.  Read the full story...

  • A black beetle with orange markings on its back, the ends of its antenae and its fore legs
    Information icon American burying beetle. Photo by Mark Dumont, CC BY-NC 2.0.

    Conservation partnerships lead to proposed downlisting of American burying beetle

    May 1, 2019 | 5 minute read

    The American burying beetle, one of nature’s most unique creatures, appears to be more plentiful, thanks in part to the efforts of a wide array of partners across its range. Following the beetle’s listing in 1989 as endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and stakeholders implemented conservation and recovery efforts, and now the Service is proposing to downlist it from endangered to threatened.  Read the full story...

  • A biologist dressed for cold weather holds an acient-looking fish on a boat at sea
    Information icon Biologist Albert Spells with Atlantic sturgeon. Photo by USFWS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status review of Atlantic sturgeon (Gulf subspecies)

    April 11, 2019 | 2 minute read

    As part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries will jointly conduct a five-year status review of the Atlantic sturgeon (Gulf subspecies). This fish, federally listed as threatened, is found along the coasts and in the rivers of Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning the Atlantic sturgeon on or before June 10, 2019.  Read the full story...

  • A bird of prey flying over a wetland.
    Information icon Everglades snail kite at Lake Kissimmee, Florida. Photo by South Florida Wetland Management District.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of 36 Southeastern species

    April 11, 2019 | 6 minute read

    As part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of 36 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife, and plants. They are found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before June 10, 2019. These five-year reviews will ensure listing classifications under the ESA are accurate, and recommend changes in status where appropriate based on the latest science and analysis.  Read the full story...

  • Small bird with brown and white feathering. Yellow feathering on its head.
    Information icon Florida grasshopper sparrow and chicks. Photo by rarespecies.org.

    Foundation awards $35,000 for Florida grasshopper sparrow survival

    April 10, 2019 | 2 minute read

    Tallahassee, Florida — The nonprofit Fish & Wildlife Foundation of Florida (FWFF) has announced a $35,000 gift to White Oak Conservation to help ensure the Florida grasshopper sparrow’s survival. This grant follows a similar $10,000 gift made in February. The Florida grasshopper sparrow is North America’s most endangered bird. Fewer than 50 breeding pairs are left in the wild. To save this imperiled ground-nesting bird, federal and state agencies and an array of private conservation groups are using a multi-pronged strategy that includes protecting nests from predators and flooding, improving habitat via prescribed burns, and conducting research.  Read the full story...

  • A tall, grey bird with red markings on its face laying low in the flooded grass
    Information icon Mississippi sandhill crane incubating its nest. Photo by USFWS.

    Endangered Mississippi sandhill cranes reintroduced to the wild

    December 17, 2018 | 4 minute read

    Yulee, Florida — White Oak Conservation is pleased to announce that three endangered Mississippi sandhill cranes that hatched this spring at White Oak were reintroduced to the wild last week at the Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge near Gautier, Mississippi. The three were released in partnership with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Audubon Species Survival Center. Only about 130 Mississippi sandhill cranes and 34 breeding pairs remain in the wild.  Read the full story...

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