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Tag: Recovery

The content below has been tagged with the term “Recovery.”

Articles

  • A flowering bush with pink flowers.
    Information icon Roan Mountain bluet. Photo by BlueRidgeKitties, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0.

    Mars Hill College Students Help Conserve Endangered Plant

    October 14, 2008 | 3 minute read

    A group of Mars Hill College students are working with professor Scott Pearson to bring the power of the school’s computers to bear in an effort to help the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) protect the endangered Roan Mountain bluet. Roan Mountain bluet is found at only a handful of high elevation sites in five western North Carolina counties. With such a limited distribution, knowing where every plant is found is critical to scientists working to save the plant.  Learn more...

Charleston

  • A green and balck salamander on a rust colored log
    Information icon Green salamander. Photo © Alan Cressler.

    At-risk species

    The South Carolina Coastal Program is a partnership driven program that conserves and protects natural habitat for federally listed species by providing technical and financial assistance for numerous public and private partners. The South Carolina Coastal Program is focused on the coastal plain of South Carolina and a portion of Georgia and works in a variety of habitats, including wetlands, uplands, estuaries, and beaches.  Learn more...

  • A small green succulent plant growing outo the sand on a beach.
    Information icon Seabeach amaranth at Cape Romain NWR. Photo by Jennifer Koches, USFWS.

    Endangered species

    When Congress passed the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in 1973, it recognized that our rich natural heritage is of “esthetic, ecological, educational, recreational, and scientific value to our Nation and its people.” It further expressed concern that many of our nation’s native plants and animals were in danger of becoming extinct. The purpose of the ESA is to protect and recover imperiled species and the ecosystems upon which they depend.  Learn more...

News

  • An adult red wolf walking stealthily in a caged enclosure at the zoo.
    Information icon Adult Red wolf. Photo by Brad McPhee, Defiance Zoo and Aquarium.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announces the availability of the red wolf five-year review

    October 10, 2007 | 2 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) announced today the completion and availability of the five-year status review of the red wolf. After reviewing all of the best scientific and commercially available information and data, the Service recommended that the current listing classification for the red wolf remain unchanged. This means the world’s only wild red wolf population, restored in North Carolina, continues to have non-essential, experimental status. Red wolves located at island propagation sites and in captive breeding facilities continue to have full endangered status.  Read the full story...

Wildlife

  • A mussel with fringe around its opening partially burried in the sand on the river bottom.
    Information icon Appalachian elktoe in the Little River Translyvania County NC. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Appalachian elktoe

    The Appalachian elktoe has a thin, kidney-shaped shell, extending to about 4 inches. Juveniles generally have a yellowish-brown periostracum (outer shell surface), while the periostracum of the adults is usually dark brown to greenish-black in color.  Visit the species profile...

  • About a dozen small fish in a container ready for release
    Information icon Cape Fear shiners. Photo by NCWRC.

    Cape Fear shiner

    The Cape Fear shiner is a freshwater fish in the minnow family found in the central part of North Carolina, in the Upper Cape Fear River Basin.  Visit the species profile...

  • A dark colored mussel embedded in a stream bed, open filtering water.
    Information icon Carolina heelsplitter. Photo by USFWS.

    Carolina heelsplitter

    Taxon: Mussel Range: North Carolina, South Carolina Status: Listed as endangered on June 30, 1993 Related content Feb 5, 2020 | 5 minute read Articles A good year at the hatcheries Oct 28, 2019 | 2 minute read Articles Against all odds: return of the Gills Creek ecosystem Sep 28, 2018 | 2 minute read Articles Private landowners step up to save the Carolina Heelsplitter Mar 9, 2018 | 3 minute read News Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of eight southeastern species Oct 13, 2017 | 2 minute read Articles Fish passage project benefits Carolina heelsplitter Jun 12, 2017 | 7 minute read Articles Musseling back from near extinction Jun 6, 2017 | 2 minute read Articles North Carolina biologist recognized for work to recover endangered species May 19, 2017 | 8 minute read News 2016 National and Regional Recovery Champions Jun 2, 2014 | 2 minute read Podcasts North Carolinas Conservation Aquaculture Center Aug 4, 2010 | 2 minute read Podcasts North Carolina’s conservation aquaculture center Wildlife Carolina heelsplitter Appearance The Carolina heelsplitter freshwater mussel was first described in 1852.  Visit the species profile...

  • A mussel sitting on rocky substrate with rays like growth rings on a tree and dark vertical stiping.
    Information icon Cumberland combshell. Photo by Dick Biggins, USFWS.

    Cumberland combshell

    The Cumberlandian combshell has a thick solid shell with a smooth to clothlike periostracum (thin, skin-like coating), which is yellow to tawny brown in color with narrow green broken rays.  Visit the species profile...

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

    Eastern black rail

    Black rails are the smallest rails in North America. One of four recognized subspecies of black rail, the eastern black rail is perhaps the most secretive. This small inhabitant of shallow salt and freshwater marshes is rarely seen and has a distinctive “kick-ee-doo” call that is often heard at night.  Visit the species profile...

  • A white breasted bird with blueish grey feathers.
    Elfin-woods warbler. Photo by Mike Morel.

    Elfin-woods warbler

    The elfin-woods warbler was discovered in 1968. In 2016, the elfin-woods warbler was listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act with a Section 4(d) rule providing exemptions for certain agriculture and forestry activities that may benefit the species.  Visit the species profile...

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