skip to content

Tag: Recovery

The content below has been tagged with the term “Recovery.”

Articles

  • A tiny beige fish with three vertical stripes along its back
    Information icon An adult trispot darter measures less than two inches; the measure shown here is in centimeters. Photo by USFWS.

    For the love of a darter: partners promote a fishy courtship

    April 22, 2020 | 4 minute read

    Nestled in the rolling hills of St. Clair County, Alabama, is a small, unassuming stream that is getting a lot of attention these days. This intermittent stream is a small tributary to Little Canoe Creek which appears to be no different than many others in the area. In fact, it doesn’t even have flowing water during most of the year. However, this one is special, at least from a conservation standpoint.  Learn more...

  • A bright green parrot with red markings on its face and blue flight feathers.
    Information icon When in flight, some of the PR Parrots show their beautiful blue primary feathers. En español: Algunas cotorras muestran sus bellas plumas primarias azules al volar. Bosque del Estado, Maricao, Puerto Rico. Photo by Jan Paul Zegarra, Biologist, USFWS

    Good news comes winging

    February 28, 2020 | 3 minute read

    About a month ago, biologists with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) released two groups of Puerto Rican parrots into a national forest in Puerto Rico – the first birds to fly free in the forest since two hurricanes devastated the region more than two years ago. Marisel Lopez-Flores, left, Project Leader for the Puerto Rican Recovery Program, and Iris Rodriguez, a Biological Science Technician with the program, tend to parrots at the El Yunque National Forest aviary in Puerto Rico.  Learn more...

  • A low-growing shrub with leaves like sand dollars
    Information icon A rare hairy rattleweed plant. Photo by Daniel Chapman, USFWS.

    Learning to love a hairy rattleweed

    February 18, 2020 | 6 minute read

    Brunswick, Georgia — It sounds like the name of a punk rocker, or an illicit drug. It lurks under power lines, along roadsides and between rows of commercial pine trees. It’s covered in tiny, cobwebby hairs. It’s got a shape only a botanist could love. Pity the little-known, inelegantly named hairy rattleweed, or Baptisia arachnifera. It is one of the nation’s rarest plants, found in only two southeast Georgia counties and federally listed as an endangered species.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A green plant with bunches bright white flowers
    Information icon Cumberland sandwort. Photo by Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation.

    Proposed delisting of Cumberland sandwort from ESA due to recovery

    April 24, 2020 | 6 minute read

    What action is the Service taking? The Service is proposing to delist the Cumberland sandwort, a delicate perennial white flowering plant in Tennessee and Kentucky, from the Endangered Species Act (ESA) due to recovery. Based on a thorough review of the best available science, the Service found that the species is healthy and stable, and it no longer meets the definition of threatened or endangered under the ESA. We are also announcing the availability of a draft post-delisting monitoring plan (PDM), to help ensure that the sandwort remains healthy and secure from the risk of extinction after it is delisted.  Learn more...

  • A pinkish green flower petal growing off of a mossy covered surface
    Information icon *Lepanthes eltoroensis*. Photo © O Monsegur.

    Proposal to remove Lepanthes eltoroensis from the Federal List of Threatened and Endangered Plants

    March 9, 2020 | 6 minute read

    What is Lepanthes eltoroensis? Lepanthes eltoroensis is an orchid that measures no more than 4 centimeters long with a single leaf and three to seven slender stems. Found only in El Yunque National Forest in Puerto Rico, it grows on moss-covered tree trunks. The orchid is found only within the cloud forest, where important habitat components seem to be elevation, adequate moisture, open gaps in the canopy, and the presence of moss.  Learn more...

  • A jet black snake with opaque white belly coiled up in the grass.
    Information icon Black pinesnake. Photo by Jim Lee, The Nature Conservancy.

    Black pinesnake final Critical Habitat designation

    February 25, 2020 | 6 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is finalizing designation of critical habitat for the black pinesnake, which is listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). What is the black pinesnake and where is it found? The black pinesnake is a large, nonvenomous snake, one of three subspecies of pinesnakes in the southeastern United States. These snakes are typically all black and may reach up to six feet in length.  Learn more...

News

  • A green plant with bunches bright white flowers
    Information icon Cumberland sandwort. Photo by Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation.

    Service proposes delisting the Cumberland sandwort

    April 24, 2020 | 4 minute read

    Found only in a small portion of the Cumberland Plateau in northern Tennessee and southern Kentucky, the Cumberland sandwort was headed toward extinction before it was listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in 1988. That’s when the states of Tennessee and Kentucky, federal agencies and conservation groups stepped in to protect and restore this unique plant. Thanks to these ESA-inspired partnerships, Cumberland sandwort populations are now healthy, robust and stable, and a scientifically rigorous review of the best available science has determined the species no longer faces the threat of extinction.  Read the full story...

  • A pinkish green flower petal growing off of a mossy covered surface
    Information icon *Lepanthes eltoroensis*. Photo © O Monsegur.

    Partners celebrate recovery of tiny orchid in Puerto Rico

    March 9, 2020 | 3 minute read

    Thanks to a successful conservation partnership involving the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the U.S. Forest Service, and the Puerto Rico Department of Natural and Environmental Resources, a tiny orchid, Lepanthes eltoroensis, is being proposed for delisting from the Federal List of Threatened and Endangered Plants. The orchid is restricted to one general area within El Yunque National Forest in Puerto Rico at elevations above 2,461 feet. However, the orchid’s estimated population has increased from around 140 individuals, when it was listed as an endangered species in 1991, to a current estimate of about 3,000 individuals.  Read the full story...

  • A pinkish green flower petal growing off of a mossy covered surface
    Information icon *Lepanthes eltoroensis*. Photo © O Monsegur.

    Se celebra la recuperación de una pequeña orquídea en Puerto Rico

    March 9, 2020 | 4 minute read

    Gracias a la exitosa colaboración de conservación entre el Servicio Federal de Pesca y Vida Silvestre, El Servicio Forestal Federal y el Departamento de Recursos Naturales y Ambientales de Puerto Rico, se ha propuesto remover a Lepanthes eltoroensis, una pequeña orquídea, de la lista federal de especies amenazadas y en peligro de extinción. Esta orquídea está restringida a un área específica en elevaciones sobre los 2,461 pies dentro del Bosque Nacional El Yunque.  Read the full story...

  • A jet black snake with opaque white belly coiled up in the grass.
    Information icon Black pinesnake. Photo by Jim Lee, The Nature Conservancy.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service finalizes Critical Habitat for threatened black pinesnake

    February 25, 2020 | 3 minute read

    Daphne, Alabama — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has finalized critical habitat under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) for the black pinesnake, a non-venomous constrictor found only in Mississippi and Alabama. This native reptile was listed as threatened under the ESA in 2015 following population declines due to habitat loss and degradation. The black pinesnake is native to longleaf pine forests, one of the world’s most ecologically diverse natural places and one that is in peril.  Read the full story...

Contact Us:

Looking for a media contact? Reach out to a regional spokesperson.

Share this page

Tweet this page on Twitter or follow @USFWSsoutheast

Share this page on Facebook or follow USFWSsoutheast.

LinkedIn

Share this page on LinkedIn