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Tag: Recovery

The content below has been tagged with the term “Recovery.”

Articles

  • A man with a beard looks closely at an insect with a magnifying glass

    Protecting the rare

    September 18, 2018 | 5 minute readSequatchie Cave State Natural Area, Tennessee — A royal snail is about the size of a match head. You could be standing in a few inches of water with lots of royal snails at your feet, look down, and not even see them. The royal snail, found only in one county in Tennessee, was declared in endangered in 1994. Photo by David Withers, Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation. “If it looks like a caterpillar turd but it starts moving, that’s a royal snail,” cracks David Withers, a zoologist with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation. Learn more...

    Zoologist David Withers of the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation examines a Sequatchie caddisfly, an insect that lives in only a very few spots in Tennessee. Photo by Phil Kloer, USFWS.

Endangered-Species-Act

  • An adult bald eagle soars in front of a bright blue sky

    Recovering threatened and endangered species

    After a plant or animal is listed as protected under the Endangered Species Act, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologists must determine what the species needs in order to achieve recovery, meaning it no longer requires federal protection. Learn more...

    A bald eagle in flight at Seedskadee National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Tom Koerner, USFWS.

  • Bilogists place mussels in a stream bed while a third person records information in a notebook.

    Species Status Assessments (SSA)

    The Species Status Assessment framework is an analytical approach developed by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service to deliver foundational science for informing all Endangered Species Act (ESA) decisions. An SSA is a focused, repeatable, and rigorous scientific assessment. The result will be better assessments, improved and more transparent and defensible decision making, and clearer and more concise documents. The Service is already seeing benefits from this approach. Ideally, the SSA is conducted at or prior to the candidate assessment or 12-month finding stage, but can be initiated at any time. Learn more...

    Releasing golden riffleshells mussels and recording their location. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

Lafayette

  • A large black bear with a small cub nestled in the upper branches of a hardwood tree.

    Endangered species and recovery

    One of the primary responsibilities of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is to protect and recover imperiled species and the ecosystems upon which they depend. Congress defined “species” to include subspecies, varieties, and, for vertebrates, distinct population segments. The Endangered Species Act (ESA) is America’s strongest conservation law. Originally passed by Congress in 1973, the ESA is jointly administered by the Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS). Learn more...

    Louisiana black bear female with her two cubs in a tree. Photo by Clint Turnage, USDA.

News

  • A small semi-transluscent catfish in an aquarium.

    Recovery plan for endangered Chucky madtom available

    September 19, 2018 | 3 minute readThe final recovery plan for the Chucky madtom, a federally listed endangered small catfish, is now available. The Chucky madtom lives in a single tributary of the Nolichucky River in East Tennessee. Threats to the species include loss of habitat, small population size, inability to offset mortality with natural reproduction, and their resulting vulnerability to natural or human-induced catastrophic events, such as droughts and pollution. This plan describes actions considered necessary for the recovery of this fish, establishes criteria for delisting the species, and estimates the time and cost for implementing the measures needed. Read the full story...

    Chucky madtom. Photo by J.R. Shute, Conservation Fisheries, Inc.

  • A patterned black and gray snake blends in to the strewn, dark pine needles on the forest floor.

    Notice of Availability of a draft environmental assessment for a proposed rule under section 4(d) of the Endangered Species Act for the Louisiana pinesnake

    September 18, 2018 | 1 minute readComments Comments will be accepted until October 18, 2018. Addresses You may submit comments, or requests for or more information, by any of the following methods: Email: Lafayette@fws.gov. Include “Louisiana Pinesnake EA” in the subject line Fax: [ATTN: Joseph Ranson], 337-291-3139 U.S. Mail: 646 Cajundome Blvd, Suite 400, Lafayette, LA 70506 In-person drop-off, viewing, or pickup: Call 337-291-3100 to make an appointment (necessary for view/pickup only) during regular business hours at 646 Cajundome Blvd, Suite 400, Lafayette, LA, 70506 In person viewing: U. Read the full story...

    Louisiana pinesnake. Photo by Michael Sealy, USFWS.

  • Draft recovery plan for endangered Neosho mucket available

    August 16, 2018 | 2 minute readThe Neosho mucket is a freshwater mussel that grows up to five inches long, which is large for a mussel, and is found in river basins in Arkansas, Kansas, Oklahoma and Missouri. It was listed as an endangered species in 2013 under the Endangered Species Act. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) has been working closely with private landowners and communities, state and federal agencies, universities, and conservation institutes, to survey for individuals and protect and restore the mussel’s habitat. Read the full story...

  • A male red wolf looks on as two pups play

    Service reopens comment period on new management rule for red wolves in North Carolina

    August 10, 2018 | 3 minute readThe U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is reopening the public comment period on a proposed rule to replace the existing regulations governing the nonessential experimental population of the red wolf under section 10(j) of the Endangered Species Act (ESA). On June 28, 2018, the Service published in the Federal Register a proposed rule that would remove management efforts from existing private lands and instead focus continuing efforts on certain public lands in Hyde and Dare counties, North Carolina. Read the full story...

    Red wolf (Canis rufus) with pups. Photo by Valerie, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

  • A small woodpecker perched on a pine tree.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of 42 southeastern species

    August 3, 2018 | 7 minute readThe red-cockaded woodpecker is one of 42 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife and plants that will get updated five-year status reviews conducted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in the months ahead. They are all found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before October 5, 2018. These five-year reviews, required by the Endangered Species Act (ESA) will ensure listing classifications under the ESA are accurate and recommend changes in status where appropriate based on the latest science and analysis. Read the full story...

    In 2018, there were 38 active clusters of endangered red-cockaded woodpeckers on this property in Alabama, thriving there under a Safe Harbor Agreement. Composite photo by Mark Bailey.

  • A tiny yellow/orange frog with big round eyes.

    Draft recovery plan for endangered Puerto Rican frog available

    July 6, 2018 | 2 minute read“Kee, kee,” a male coquí llanero softly sings from dusk to dawn in a Puerto Rican wetland. Hearing its high-pitched call is rare because the tiny frog is only found in one freshwater wetland in the municipality of Toa Baja, Puerto Rico. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has prepared a draft recovery plan outlining actions to save this dime-sized frog, which has been federally listed as endangered since October 2012. Read the full story...

    Coqui Llanero. Photo by Luis J. Villanueva CC BY-NC-SA 2.0.

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