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Tag: Recovery

The content below has been tagged with the term “Recovery.”

Articles

  • A new culvert under a bridge allows water to flow freely rather than through narrow channels.
    Information icon Downstream view of the Gills Creek Drive road crossing after culvert replacement. Photo, Morgan Wolf, USFWS

    Against all odds: return of the Gills Creek ecosystem

    October 28, 2019 | 2 minute read

    If you had asked recovery biologists 10 years ago to list the best places to return mussels to the wild, Gills Creek would have been at the very bottom of that list. The small South Carolina stream had been through a lot. Too much, it seemed, to recover. Situated just south of Charlotte, North Carolina, and east of Lancaster, South Carolina, the watershed had seen the advance of suburban sprawl, and was battling ongoing agricultural degradation.  Learn more...

  • Two dozen or more conservationists gather for a discussion at high altitude on a cold, foggy morning.
    Information icon Service biologist, Sue Cameron, gives instructions on planting red spruce. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Mapping the sky islands

    October 9, 2019 | 7 minute read

    Asheville, North Carolina — On November 24, 1983, a Cessna 414A left Chicago en route to Sylva, North Carolina, a small town just south of the Blue Ridge Parkway. The plane’s last radar contact showed an altitude of 6,100 feet. About a mile later, at an altitude of about 6,000 feet, it crashed into the ridge between Waterrock Knob and Mount Lynn Lowery, in North Carolina’s Plott Balsam Mountains — the last mountain range before descending to Sylva.  Learn more...

Caribbean

  • An adult sea turtle on a sandy beach.
    Information icon Leatherback sea turtle (Dermochelys coriacea). Photo © Karla Morales.

    Overseeing the Endangered Species Act

    One of the primary responsibilities of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is to protect and recover imperiled species and the ecosystems upon which they depend. The Endangered Species Act (ESA) is America’s strongest conservation law. Originally passed by Congress in 1973, the ESA is jointly administered by the Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS). The Service has primary responsibility for terrestrial and freshwater organisms, while the responsibilities of NMFS are mainly marine.  Learn more...

  • A bright green parrot with red markings on its face and blue flight feathers.
    Information icon Puerto Rican parrot (Amazona vittata) © Alfredo Irizarry.

    Puerto Rican Parrot recovery program

    The Puerto Rican parrot recovery program is an effort to conserve, protect and manage wild and captive parrots in order to downlist the species from endangered to threatened.  Learn more...

Endangered-Species-Act

  • An adult bald eagle soars in front of a bright blue sky
    Information icon A bald eagle in flight at Seedskadee National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Tom Koerner, USFWS.

    Recovering threatened and endangered species

    After a plant or animal is listed as protected under the Endangered Species Act, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologists must determine what the species needs in order to achieve recovery, meaning it no longer requires federal protection.  Learn more...

  • Bilogists place mussels in a stream bed while a third person records information in a notebook.
    Releasing golden riffleshells mussels and recording their location. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Species Status Assessments (SSA)

    The Species Status Assessment framework is an analytical approach developed by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service to deliver foundational science for informing all Endangered Species Act (ESA) decisions. An SSA is a focused, repeatable, and rigorous scientific assessment. The result will be better assessments, improved and more transparent and defensible decision making, and clearer and more concise documents. The Service is already seeing benefits from this approach. Ideally, the SSA is conducted at or prior to the candidate assessment or 12-month finding stage, but can be initiated at any time.  Learn more...

Lafayette

  • A large black bear with a small cub nestled in the upper branches of a hardwood tree.
    Information icon Louisiana black bear female with her two cubs in a tree. Photo by Clint Turnage, USDA.

    Endangered species and recovery

    One of the primary responsibilities of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is to protect and recover imperiled species and the ecosystems upon which they depend. Congress defined “species” to include subspecies, varieties, and, for vertebrates, distinct population segments. The Endangered Species Act (ESA) is America’s strongest conservation law. Originally passed by Congress in 1973, the ESA is jointly administered by the Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS).  Learn more...

News

  • Two black and white birds on the edge of a body of water.
    Information icon Interior least tern. Photo by USFWS.

    Recovery of America’s smallest tern prompts proposal to delist

    October 23, 2019 | 5 minute read

    When the interior least tern was listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in 1985, there were fewer than 2,000 birds and only a few dozen nesting sites scattered across a once-expansive range that covered America’s Great Plains and Lower Mississippi Valley. Today there are more than 18,000 interior least terns at more than 480 nesting sites in 18 states, thanks to decades of innovative conservation efforts and diverse partnerships among local, state and federal stakeholders.  Read the full story...

  • A small yellow breasted bird with grey feathers.
    Information icon Kirtland’s warblers nest exclusively in jack pine stands. Photo by Joel Trick, USFWS.

    Partners celebrate successful recovery of beloved songbird

    October 8, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Bird enthusiasts from around the world travel to northern Michigan in hopes of catching sight of a Kirtland’s warbler, a small songbird once poised on the brink of extinction. Now the species is thriving thanks to decades of effort by a diverse group of dedicated partners. Due to the species’ remarkable recovery, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced that it no longer warrants protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).  Read the full story...

  • Two light tan and grey reptiles with dark eyes walking on organic soil.
    Information icon A pair of Monito geckos. Photo by JP Zegarra, USFWS.

    A salvo de extinción el geco de Monito

    October 2, 2019 | 4 minute read

    El geco o salamanquita de Monito, un reptil pequeño resiliente que sólo se encuentra en la Isla de Monito en el Mar Caribe, está oficialmente recuperado gracias a los esfuerzos de conservación entre el Servicio Federal de Pesca y Vida Silvestre (USFWS, por sus siglas en inglés) y el Departamento de Recursos Naturales y Ambientales de Puerto Rico (DRNA). Ahora la especie es abundante y no requiere la protección de la Ley Federal de Especies en Peligro de Extinción (ESA, por sus siglas en inglés).  Read the full story...

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