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Tag: Recovery

The content below has been tagged with the term “Recovery.”

Articles

  • A bright green parrot with red markings on its face and blue flight feathers.
    Information icon When in flight, some of the PR Parrots show their beautiful blue primary feathers. En español: Algunas cotorras muestran sus bellas plumas primarias azules al volar. Bosque del Estado, Maricao, Puerto Rico. Photo by Jan Paul Zegarra, Biologist, USFWS

    Good news comes winging

    February 28, 2020 | 3 minute read

    About a month ago, biologists with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) released two groups of Puerto Rican parrots into a national forest in Puerto Rico – the first birds to fly free in the forest since two hurricanes devastated the region more than two years ago. Marisel Lopez-Flores, left, Project Leader for the Puerto Rican Recovery Program, and Iris Rodriguez, a Biological Science Technician with the program, tend to parrots at the El Yunque National Forest aviary in Puerto Rico.  Learn more...

Caribbean

  • An adult sea turtle on a sandy beach.
    Information icon Leatherback sea turtle (Dermochelys coriacea). Photo © Karla Morales.

    Overseeing the Endangered Species Act

    One of the primary responsibilities of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is to protect and recover imperiled species and the ecosystems upon which they depend. The Endangered Species Act (ESA) is America’s strongest conservation law. Originally passed by Congress in 1973, the ESA is jointly administered by the Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS). The Service has primary responsibility for terrestrial and freshwater organisms, while the responsibilities of NMFS are mainly marine.  Learn more...

  • A bright green parrot with red markings on its face and blue flight feathers.
    Information icon Puerto Rican parrot (Amazona vittata) © Alfredo Irizarry.

    Puerto Rican Parrot recovery program

    The Puerto Rican parrot recovery program is an effort to conserve, protect and manage wild and captive parrots in order to downlist the species from endangered to threatened.  Learn more...

Endangered-Species-Act

  • An adult bald eagle soars in front of a bright blue sky
    Information icon A bald eagle in flight at Seedskadee National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Tom Koerner, USFWS.

    Recovering threatened and endangered species

    After a plant or animal is listed as protected under the Endangered Species Act, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologists must determine what the species needs in order to achieve recovery, meaning it no longer requires federal protection.  Learn more...

  • Bilogists place mussels in a stream bed while a third person records information in a notebook.
    Releasing golden riffleshells mussels and recording their location. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Species Status Assessments (SSA)

    The Species Status Assessment framework is an analytical approach developed by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service to deliver foundational science for informing all Endangered Species Act (ESA) decisions. An SSA is a focused, repeatable, and rigorous scientific assessment. The result will be better assessments, improved and more transparent and defensible decision making, and clearer and more concise documents. The Service is already seeing benefits from this approach. Ideally, the SSA is conducted at or prior to the candidate assessment or 12-month finding stage, but can be initiated at any time.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A pinkish green flower petal growing off of a mossy covered surface
    Information icon *Lepanthes eltoroensis*. Photo © O Monsegur.

    Proposal to remove Lepanthes eltoroensis from the Federal List of Threatened and Endangered Plants

    March 9, 2020 | 6 minute read

    What is Lepanthes eltoroensis? Lepanthes eltoroensis is an orchid that measures no more than 4 centimeters long with a single leaf and three to seven slender stems. Found only in El Yunque National Forest in Puerto Rico, it grows on moss-covered tree trunks. The orchid is found only within the cloud forest, where important habitat components seem to be elevation, adequate moisture, open gaps in the canopy, and the presence of moss.  Learn more...

Lafayette

  • A large black bear with a small cub nestled in the upper branches of a hardwood tree.
    Information icon Louisiana black bear female with her two cubs in a tree. Photo by Clint Turnage, USDA.

    Endangered species and recovery

    One of the primary responsibilities of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is to protect and recover imperiled species and the ecosystems upon which they depend. Congress defined “species” to include subspecies, varieties, and, for vertebrates, distinct population segments. The Endangered Species Act (ESA) is America’s strongest conservation law. Originally passed by Congress in 1973, the ESA is jointly administered by the Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS).  Learn more...

News

  • A pinkish green flower petal growing off of a mossy covered surface
    Information icon *Lepanthes eltoroensis*. Photo © O Monsegur.

    Partners celebrate recovery of tiny orchid in Puerto Rico

    March 9, 2020 | 3 minute read

    Thanks to a successful conservation partnership involving the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the U.S. Forest Service, and the Puerto Rico Department of Natural and Environmental Resources, a tiny orchid, Lepanthes eltoroensis, is being proposed for delisting from the Federal List of Threatened and Endangered Plants. The orchid is restricted to one general area within El Yunque National Forest in Puerto Rico at elevations above 2,461 feet. However, the orchid’s estimated population has increased from around 140 individuals, when it was listed as an endangered species in 1991, to a current estimate of about 3,000 individuals.  Read the full story...

  • A pinkish green flower petal growing off of a mossy covered surface
    Information icon *Lepanthes eltoroensis*. Photo © O Monsegur.

    Se celebra la recuperación de una pequeña orquídea en Puerto Rico

    March 9, 2020 | 4 minute read

    Gracias a la exitosa colaboración de conservación entre el Servicio Federal de Pesca y Vida Silvestre, El Servicio Forestal Federal y el Departamento de Recursos Naturales y Ambientales de Puerto Rico, se ha propuesto remover a Lepanthes eltoroensis, una pequeña orquídea, de la lista federal de especies amenazadas y en peligro de extinción. Esta orquídea está restringida a un área específica en elevaciones sobre los 2,461 pies dentro del Bosque Nacional El Yunque.  Read the full story...

Warm-Springs-Fish-Technology-Center

  • A welcome sign that reads Warm Springs Regional Fisheries Center, National Fish Hatchery, Fish Health Lab, Fish Technology Center
    Information icon Welcome to the Warm Springs Regional Fisheries Center. Photo by USFWS.

    Warm Springs Fish Technology Center

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Fish Technology Centers (FTC) provide leadership in science-based management of aquatic resources through the development of new concepts, strategies, technologies and techniques to solve problems and develop innovative efficiencies for hatchery operations and for aquatic resource conservation. FTCs were established in 1984 by the Service to provide technical and scientific leadership and guidance to the fish culture community. The Warm Springs Fish Technology Center (WSFTC) was established in 1993, to strengthen fish culture and fish management-related technology development within the Southeast and support other program areas through outreach.  Learn more...

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