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Tag: Recovery

The content below has been tagged with the term “Recovery.”

Articles

  • A brown and white hawk perched on a tree branch
    Information icon A Puerto Rican sharp-shinned hawk. Photo © The Peregrine Fund.

    Puerto Rico’s sharp-shinned hawk soars again thanks to Service partnership

    July 10, 2020 | 5 minute read

    The future for Puerto Rico’s sharp-shinned hawk — or gavilán de sierra — looked bleak in 2017, with only 75 of the federally endangered raptors soaring above the island’s deeply forested hilltops. And then Hurricane Maria hit. Russell Thorstrom, a biologist with The Peregrine Fund, visited a few months after the winds topped 155 miles per hour and more than two feet of rain fell. He estimated only 19 sharpies survived.  Learn more...

  • Two long-necked grey birds with red markings on their heads near a small pond
    Information icon A pair of Mississippi sandhill cranes forage in a private pasture that is permanently protected as crane habitat by an NRCS Agricultural Land Easement. Photo by Jason Keenan, NRCS.

    Service’s Coastal Program Helps Recover Mississippi Sandhill Crane

    May 22, 2020 | 4 minute read

    Mississippi has several rare birds, but one of the rarest is the Mississippi sandhill crane, with only about 125 individuals left in the wild. This non-migratory subspecies of the sandhill crane once lived in coastal Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama, and western Florida, but the only place they currently exist in the wild is in and around the 19,000-acre Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge in Jackson County, Mississippi. The refuge was established in 1975 to help prevent these striking birds from becoming extinct, and it was the very first national wildlife refuge established specifically for an endangered species.  Learn more...

  • A deep black snake coiled up on sandy soil with young longleaf pine seedlings in the background
    Information icon An Eastern indigo snake on sandy soil associated with the longleaf pine ecosystem. Photo © Houston Chandler, the Orianne Society (Used with permission).

    22 Eastern Indigo Snakes just released in annual effort to return America’s longest snake to North Florida

    May 8, 2020 | 8 minute read

    Tallahassee, Florida — In an enthusiastic launch of year four of the 10-year effort to return the essential, native, non-venomous apex predator to the region, 22 eastern indigo snakes have just been released in northern Florida. This collaborative program continues the annual release of snakes, listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act and raised specifically for recovery of the species, to The Nature Conservancy’s Apalachicola Bluffs and Ravines Preserve (ABRP) in Bristol.  Learn more...

  • A grey and black reticulated salamander walking through the grass
    Information icon Endangered reticulated flatwoods salamander. Photo by Virginia Tech.

    Breakthrough for recovering endangered Florida salamanders encourages scientists

    May 7, 2020 | 3 minute read

    A little good news in these crazy coronavirus times: the very small and federally endangered reticulated flatwoods salamander recently notched a much-needed victory in its long struggle to avoid extinction. Ecologist Harold Mitchell explains: “We translocated salamander larvae to another pond where they successfully turned into metamorphs. This shows that the animals can live if they’re moved from one location to another. That’s never been done before with this species.  Learn more...

Caribbean

  • An adult sea turtle on a sandy beach.
    Information icon Leatherback sea turtle (Dermochelys coriacea). Photo © Karla Morales.

    Overseeing the Endangered Species Act

    One of the primary responsibilities of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is to protect and recover imperiled species and the ecosystems upon which they depend. The Endangered Species Act (ESA) is America’s strongest conservation law. Originally passed by Congress in 1973, the ESA is jointly administered by the Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS). The Service has primary responsibility for terrestrial and freshwater organisms, while the responsibilities of NMFS are mainly marine.  Learn more...

  • A bright green parrot with red markings on its face and blue flight feathers.
    Information icon Puerto Rican parrot (Amazona vittata) © Alfredo Irizarry.

    Puerto Rican Parrot recovery program

    The Puerto Rican parrot recovery program is an effort to conserve, protect and manage wild and captive parrots in order to downlist the species from endangered to threatened.  Learn more...

Endangered-Species-Act

  • An adult bald eagle soars in front of a bright blue sky
    Information icon A bald eagle in flight at Seedskadee National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Tom Koerner, USFWS.

    Recovering threatened and endangered species

    After a plant or animal is listed as protected under the Endangered Species Act, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologists must determine what the species needs in order to achieve recovery, meaning it no longer requires federal protection.  Learn more...

  • Bilogists place mussels in a stream bed while a third person records information in a notebook.
    Releasing golden riffleshells mussels and recording their location. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Species Status Assessments (SSA)

    The Species Status Assessment framework is an analytical approach developed by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service to deliver foundational science for informing all Endangered Species Act (ESA) decisions. An SSA is a focused, repeatable, and rigorous scientific assessment. The result will be better assessments, improved and more transparent and defensible decision making, and clearer and more concise documents. The Service is already seeing benefits from this approach. Ideally, the SSA is conducted at or prior to the candidate assessment or 12-month finding stage, but can be initiated at any time.  Learn more...

Lafayette

  • A large black bear with a small cub nestled in the upper branches of a hardwood tree.
    Information icon Louisiana black bear female with her two cubs in a tree. Photo by Clint Turnage, USDA.

    Endangered species and recovery

    One of the primary responsibilities of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is to protect and recover imperiled species and the ecosystems upon which they depend. Congress defined “species” to include subspecies, varieties, and, for vertebrates, distinct population segments. The Endangered Species Act (ESA) is America’s strongest conservation law. Originally passed by Congress in 1973, the ESA is jointly administered by the Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS).  Learn more...

Warm-Springs-Fish-Technology-Center

  • A welcome sign that reads Warm Springs Regional Fisheries Center, National Fish Hatchery, Fish Health Lab, Fish Technology Center
    Information icon Welcome to the Warm Springs Regional Fisheries Center. Photo by USFWS.

    Warm Springs Fish Technology Center

    Although most hatchery lands and outdoor spaces have remained open for the public to enjoy, we encourage you to: Check local hatchery conditions on this website before visiting Follow current CDC safe practices by maintaining a safe distance between yourself and other groups Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth Cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze Most importantly, stay home if you feel sick Learn more about the U.  Learn more...

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