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Tag: Recovery

The content below has been tagged with the term “Recovery.”

Articles

  • A blue sky partially obscured by tall green pine trees.
    Information icon Longleaf pine stand located in the Coastal Headwaters forest in Alabama. Photo by USDA.

    South Carolina Partners for Fish and Wildlife helps longleaf pine, red-cockaded woodpecker

    January 29, 2021 | 2 minute read

    To fix something, it helps to first know what you’re dealing with. Take longleaf pine trees, for example. For more than a decade, the Sandhills Longleaf Pine Conservation Partnership has burned, thinned and managed longleaf pine stands on private lands within a 731-square-mile area. Yet members, including South Carolina Partners for Fish and Wildlife, didn’t really know the quantity (acres) or quality (condition) of older stands of longleaf pine in the target area.  Learn more...

Caribbean

  • An adult sea turtle on a sandy beach.
    Information icon Leatherback sea turtle (Dermochelys coriacea). Photo © Karla Morales.

    Overseeing the Endangered Species Act

    One of the primary responsibilities of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is to protect and recover imperiled species and the ecosystems upon which they depend. The Endangered Species Act (ESA) is America’s strongest conservation law. Originally passed by Congress in 1973, the ESA is jointly administered by the Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS). The Service has primary responsibility for terrestrial and freshwater organisms, while the responsibilities of NMFS are mainly marine.  Learn more...

  • A bright green parrot with red markings on its face and blue flight feathers.
    Information icon Puerto Rican parrot (Amazona vittata) © Alfredo Irizarry.

    Puerto Rican Parrot recovery program

    The Puerto Rican parrot recovery program is an effort to conserve, protect and manage wild and captive parrots in order to downlist the species from endangered to threatened.  Learn more...

Endangered-Species-Act

  • An adult bald eagle soars in front of a bright blue sky
    Information icon A bald eagle in flight at Seedskadee National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Tom Koerner, USFWS.

    Recovering threatened and endangered species

    After a plant or animal is listed as protected under the Endangered Species Act, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologists must determine what the species needs in order to achieve recovery, meaning it no longer requires federal protection.  Learn more...

  • Bilogists place mussels in a stream bed while a third person records information in a notebook.
    Releasing golden riffleshells mussels and recording their location. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Species Status Assessments (SSA)

    The Species Status Assessment framework is an analytical approach developed by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service to deliver foundational science for informing all Endangered Species Act (ESA) decisions. An SSA is a focused, repeatable, and rigorous scientific assessment. The result will be better assessments, improved and more transparent and defensible decision making, and clearer and more concise documents. The Service is already seeing benefits from this approach. Ideally, the SSA is conducted at or prior to the candidate assessment or 12-month finding stage, but can be initiated at any time.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A large turtle with a sharp beak, holding its beak open.
    Information icon Alligator snapping turtle © Chris Coppola.

    Suwannee Alligator Snapping Turtle Proposed Listing as Threatened

    April 6, 2021 | 8 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is proposing to list the Suwannee alligator snapping turtle as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). As part of the proposed rule, the Service is also proposing a 4(d) rule. The Service determined that designating critical habitat for the species is not prudent since the designation could increase the degree of threat from poaching. What is the Suwannee alligator snapping turtle?  Learn more...

Lafayette

  • A large black bear with a small cub nestled in the upper branches of a hardwood tree.
    Information icon Louisiana black bear female with her two cubs in a tree. Photo by Clint Turnage, USDA.

    Endangered species and recovery

    One of the primary responsibilities of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is to protect and recover imperiled species and the ecosystems upon which they depend. Congress defined “species” to include subspecies, varieties, and, for vertebrates, distinct population segments. The Endangered Species Act (ESA) is America’s strongest conservation law. Originally passed by Congress in 1973, the ESA is jointly administered by the Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS).  Learn more...

News

  • Summary of the Neuse River waterdog final 4(d) rule- prohibitions and exceptions.

    June 17, 2021 | 5 minute read

    The Service is announcing a final rule that identifies Endangered Species Act protections for the Neuse River waterdog. The final 4(d) rule, published in the Federal Register on June 9, 2021; and will go into effect on July 30, 2021, which is 30 days after it publishes in the Federal Register. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), has broad authority to issue regulations for the conservation of threatened species.  Read the full story...

  • A low growing grass-like plant not currently in bloom.
    Information icon Kentucky glade cress. Photo by Bryan Siders CC BY 2.0.

    Four draft recovery plans available for public review and comment

    March 25, 2021 | 2 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announces the availability for public review and comment of draft recovery plans for the reticulated and frosted flatwoods salamanders, the fluted kidneyshell, and the Kentucky glade cress. These endangered or threatened species are in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia. The draft recovery plans include specific recovery objectives and criteria based on Species Status Assessments or SSAs. The Service is requesting review and comment on these draft recovery plans from local, State, and Federal agencies, nongovernmental organizations, Tribes, and the public.  Read the full story...

Warm-Springs-Fish-Technology-Center

  • A welcome sign that reads Warm Springs Regional Fisheries Center, National Fish Hatchery, Fish Health Lab, Fish Technology Center
    Information icon Welcome to the Warm Springs Regional Fisheries Center. Photo by USFWS.

    Warm Springs Fish Technology Center

    Although most hatchery lands and outdoor spaces have remained open for the public to enjoy, we encourage you to: Check local hatchery conditions on this website before visiting Follow current CDC safe practices by maintaining a safe distance between yourself and other groups Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth Cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze Most importantly, stay home if you feel sick Learn more about the U.  Learn more...

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