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Tag: Recovery

The content below has been tagged with the term “Recovery.”

Articles

  • Three young longleaf pine trees growing in a larger forest
    Information icon Young longleaf pine at The Jones Center, also known as Ichauway. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    Woodpecker swap meet

    January 13, 2020 | 9 minute read

    Tallahassee, Florida — Will McDearman stood on a chair, raised his voice and beseeched the hundred or so wildlife officials gathered in a nondescript auditorium to offer up every woodpecker they could find. “Are all the birds on the table?” he asked. Murmurs of assent followed. McDearman, like an auctioneer, then ended the bidding that joined woodpecker donor with woodpecker donee. “Going once,” he said. “Going twice,” he said.  Learn more...

  • A man with a beard and a woman, both wearing glasses, smile for the camera at an outdoor event.
    Information icon Cheryl and Ron Babers Hagar have dedicated their retirement years to transforming 400 acres that have been in Cheryl’s family for four generations into a wildlife-friendly habit. Photo by Courtesy Cheryl and Ron Babers Hagar.

    An investment in wildlife

    December 5, 2019 | 5 minute read

    Cheryl Babers Hagar has never seen a red-cockaded woodpecker. Nor has she seen a Louisiana pinesnake, although if she sees one of those, she says she would prefer it to be with some distance between her and the reptile.  Learn more...

Caribbean

  • An adult sea turtle on a sandy beach.
    Information icon Leatherback sea turtle (Dermochelys coriacea). Photo © Karla Morales.

    Overseeing the Endangered Species Act

    One of the primary responsibilities of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is to protect and recover imperiled species and the ecosystems upon which they depend. The Endangered Species Act (ESA) is America’s strongest conservation law. Originally passed by Congress in 1973, the ESA is jointly administered by the Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS). The Service has primary responsibility for terrestrial and freshwater organisms, while the responsibilities of NMFS are mainly marine.  Learn more...

  • A bright green parrot with red markings on its face and blue flight feathers.
    Information icon Puerto Rican parrot (Amazona vittata) © Alfredo Irizarry.

    Puerto Rican Parrot recovery program

    The Puerto Rican parrot recovery program is an effort to conserve, protect and manage wild and captive parrots in order to downlist the species from endangered to threatened.  Learn more...

Endangered-Species-Act

  • An adult bald eagle soars in front of a bright blue sky
    Information icon A bald eagle in flight at Seedskadee National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Tom Koerner, USFWS.

    Recovering threatened and endangered species

    After a plant or animal is listed as protected under the Endangered Species Act, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologists must determine what the species needs in order to achieve recovery, meaning it no longer requires federal protection.  Learn more...

  • Bilogists place mussels in a stream bed while a third person records information in a notebook.
    Releasing golden riffleshells mussels and recording their location. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Species Status Assessments (SSA)

    The Species Status Assessment framework is an analytical approach developed by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service to deliver foundational science for informing all Endangered Species Act (ESA) decisions. An SSA is a focused, repeatable, and rigorous scientific assessment. The result will be better assessments, improved and more transparent and defensible decision making, and clearer and more concise documents. The Service is already seeing benefits from this approach. Ideally, the SSA is conducted at or prior to the candidate assessment or 12-month finding stage, but can be initiated at any time.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A brown mussel in a sandy river bottom
    Information icon Suwannee moccasinshell in its natural habitat. Photo by FWC.

    Suwannee moccasinshell Critical Habitat

    November 26, 2019 | 9 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is proposing to designate critical habitat for the Suwannee moccasinshell under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). What is the range of the Suwannee moccasinshell? The Suwannee moccasinshell, a small freshwater mussel, was historically present throughout much of the Suwannee River Basin; including the Suwannee River main stem in Florida, Santa River sub-basin in Florida, and the Withlacoochee River in Florida and Georgia.  Learn more...

Lafayette

  • A large black bear with a small cub nestled in the upper branches of a hardwood tree.
    Information icon Louisiana black bear female with her two cubs in a tree. Photo by Clint Turnage, USDA.

    Endangered species and recovery

    One of the primary responsibilities of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is to protect and recover imperiled species and the ecosystems upon which they depend. Congress defined “species” to include subspecies, varieties, and, for vertebrates, distinct population segments. The Endangered Species Act (ESA) is America’s strongest conservation law. Originally passed by Congress in 1973, the ESA is jointly administered by the Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS).  Learn more...

News

  • A brown mussel in a sandy river bottom
    Information icon Suwannee moccasinshell in its natural habitat. Photo by FWC.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes critical habitat for freshwater mussel in Georgia and Florida

    November 26, 2019 | 4 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today proposed critical habitat for the Suwannee moccasinshell, a freshwater mussel protected as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) since 2016. The Service is also making available a draft economic analysis that assesses the potential impact of the Suwannee moccasinshell’s critical habitat designation on various sectors of the economy. Members of the public are invited to comment on the proposal to help inform future conservation of this aquatic species and its habitat in southwest Georgia and northwest Florida.  Read the full story...

Warm-Springs-Fish-Technology-Center

  • A welcome sign that reads Warm Springs Regional Fisheries Center, National Fish Hatchery, Fish Health Lab, Fish Technology Center
    Information icon Welcome to the Warm Springs Regional Fisheries Center. Photo by USFWS.

    Warm Springs Fish Technology Center

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Fish Technology Centers (FTC) provide leadership in science-based management of aquatic resources through the development of new concepts, strategies, technologies and techniques to solve problems and develop innovative efficiencies for hatchery operations and for aquatic resource conservation. FTCs were established in 1984 by the Service to provide technical and scientific leadership and guidance to the fish culture community. The Warm Springs Fish Technology Center (WSFTC) was established in 1993, to strengthen fish culture and fish management-related technology development within the Southeast and support other program areas through outreach.  Learn more...

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