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Tag: Recovery Plan

The content below has been tagged with the term “Recovery Plan.”

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  • A tiny yellow/orange frog with big round eyes.
    Coqui Llanero. Photo by Luis J. Villanueva CC BY-NC-SA 2.0.

    Recovery plan for endangered Puerto Rican frog available

    August 12, 2019 | 2 minute read

    “Kee, kee,” a male coquí llanero softly sings from dusk to dawn in a Puerto Rican wetland. Hearing its high-pitched call is rare because the tiny frog is only found in one freshwater wetland in the municipality of Toa Baja, Puerto Rico. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has prepared a final recovery plan outlining actions to save this dime-sized frog, which has been federally listed as endangered since October 2012.  Read the full story...

  • An orange mussel partially covered by silt and algae
    Information icon Neosho mucket. Photo by Kevin Mouser, , on iNaturalist.

    Final reocvery plan for endangered mussel available

    May 3, 2019 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) announces the availability of the final recovery plan for the Neosho mucket, a federally endangered mussel that grows up to five inches long. Neosho muckets historically occurred in at least 17 streams within the Illinois, Neosho, and Verdigris River basins covering four states (Arkansas, Kansas, Oklahoma, and Missouri). It is threatened primarily by factors associated with the destruction or modification of its habitat.  Read the full story...

  • A small semi-transluscent catfish in an aquarium.
    Information icon Chucky madtom. Photo by J.R. Shute, Conservation Fisheries, Inc.

    Recovery plan for endangered Chucky madtom available

    September 19, 2018 | 3 minute read

    The final recovery plan for the Chucky madtom, a federally listed endangered small catfish, is now available. The Chucky madtom lives in a single tributary of the Nolichucky River in East Tennessee. Threats to the species include loss of habitat, small population size, inability to offset mortality with natural reproduction, and their resulting vulnerability to natural or human-induced catastrophic events, such as droughts and pollution. This plan describes actions considered necessary for the recovery of this fish, establishes criteria for delisting the species, and estimates the time and cost for implementing the measures needed.  Read the full story...

  • Draft recovery plan for endangered Neosho mucket available

    August 16, 2018 | 2 minute read

    The Neosho mucket is a freshwater mussel that grows up to five inches long, which is large for a mussel, and is found in river basins in Arkansas, Kansas, Oklahoma and Missouri. It was listed as an endangered species in 2013 under the Endangered Species Act. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) has been working closely with private landowners and communities, state and federal agencies, universities, and conservation institutes, to survey for individuals and protect and restore the mussel’s habitat.  Read the full story...

  • A light brown fish with bright orange markings on the tops of its fins.
    Information icon Yellowcheek darter. Photo by J.R. Shute, Conservation Fisheries, Inc.

    Recovery plan available for endangered yellowcheek darter

    July 5, 2018 | 2 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is announcing the availability of the final recovery plan for the yellowcheek darter, a fish listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The yellowcheek darter is a small fish native to the Little Red River basin in Arkansas. It is found in headwater streams with clear water, permanent flow, moderate to strong riffles, and gravel, rubble, and boulder substrates. Historically, the yellowcheek darter has been found in the Little Red River and its four major forks (Devils, Middle, South, and Archey) in Cleburne, Searcy, Stone, and Van Buren counties.  Read the full story...

  • A small, straw-yellow colored fish with brown markings
    Information icon Photo by Jeremy Shute, Conservation Fisheries, Inc.

    Cumberland darter draft recovery plan available for review

    April 2, 2018 | 3 minute read

    The Cumberland darter is a pencil-sized fish that lives in the Upper Cumberland River Basin in Kentucky and Tennessee. It is endangered and protected under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is releasing a draft recovery plan for the fish. The public is invited to submit comments concerning the draft recovery plan through June 4, 2018. The Cumberland darter lives in pools and shallow runs of streams with sand-covered river bottoms in that basin.  Read the full story...

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