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Tag: Raleigh Ecological Services Field Office

The content below has been tagged with the term “Raleigh Ecological Services Field Office.”

Articles

  • Cluster of three venus flytraps. Two are open revealing red interior, the other is closed showing green exterior
    Information icon Wild Venus flytrap growing with a variety of plants surrounding it. Photo by Dale Suiter, USFWS.

    Coastal Program funds survey for Venus flytrap

    November 30, 2020 | 3 minute read

    Venus flytrap is one of the most widely known carnivorous plants in the world. This unique species occurs naturally only in the Coastal Plain of southeastern North Carolina and northeastern South Carolina.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A woodpecker perched on a tree with a bug in its mouth
    Information icon A red-cockaded woodpecker has dinner outside its nesting cavity. Photo by USFWS.

    Virtual informational meeting and public hearing on proposed downlisting of red-cockaded woodpecker

    November 10, 2020 | 7 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is announcing a public hearing on the proposed downlisting of the red-cockaded woodpecker from endangered to threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The virtual public hearing will be held via Zoom and teleconference on Tuesday, December 1, 2020 from 6-9 p.m. Eastern Time. Why is the Service taking this action? On Oct. 8, 2020, the Service published a rule proposing to downlist the red-cockaded woodpecker from endangered to threatened under the ESA.  Learn more...

  • A blackish/navy blue bird with bright red eyes and white markings on its wings
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo by Christy Hand, SCDNR.

    Eastern black rail - final 4(d) rule

    October 7, 2020 | 5 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), has broad authority to issue regulations for the conservation of threatened species. The ESA provides a specific list of prohibitions for endangered species under section 9, but does not automatically provide these same prohibitions to threatened species. Section 4(d) of the ESA allows the Service to establish prohibitions or exceptions to prohibitions for threatened species. The intent of any 4(d) rule is to provide for the conservation of a threatened species by allowing regulatory flexibility under the ESA.  Learn more...

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

    Eastern black rail final listing as a threatened species

    October 7, 2020 | 14 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is finalizing a rule to protect the eastern black rail, a small secretive marsh bird native to the United States, as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Partially migratory, the eastern black rail is historically known to exist in 35 states east of the Rocky Mountains, Puerto Rico, Canada, Brazil and several countries in the Caribbean and Central America.  Learn more...

  • A tiny, featherless bird on a blanket with small ankle bands
    Information icon Red-cockaded woodpecker photo by Lynda Richardson, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries.

    Proposed downlisting of the red-cockaded woodpecker from endangered to threatened

    September 25, 2020 | 11 minute read

    Download the proposed rule to downlist the red-cockaded woodpecker from endangered to threatened with a section 4(d) rule. What is a red-cockaded woodpecker? The red-cockaded woodpecker is a territorial, non-migratory bird species of the southeastern and southern United States. It grows to about eight to nine inches long, about the size of the common cardinal, and has a wingspan of about 15 inches. The red-cockaded woodpecker’s most distinguishing feature is a black cap and nape that encircle large white cheek patches.  Learn more...

  • Seven small brownish-yellow mussels held in open hands by a biologist.
    Information icon Atlantic pigtoes ready for release. Photo by USFWS.

    Reopening of comment period on revised proposal to list Atlantic pigtoe as threatened under the ESA

    September 21, 2020 | 10 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking on the Atlantic pigtoe? The Service is reopening the comment period on the below proposed actions: Proposed listing of the Atlantic pigtoe, a freshwater mussel native to rivers of the Atlantic seaboard, as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Designate 566 river miles of critical habitat across 18 units. Implement a special rule under section 4(d) of the ESA that would streamline and exempt from the regulatory process certain management actions that benefit the mussel.  Learn more...

News

  • Summary of the Neuse River waterdog final 4(d) rule- prohibitions and exceptions.

    June 17, 2021 | 5 minute read

    The Service is announcing a final rule that identifies Endangered Species Act protections for the Neuse River waterdog. The final 4(d) rule, published in the Federal Register on June 9, 2021; and will go into effect on July 30, 2021, which is 30 days after it publishes in the Federal Register. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), has broad authority to issue regulations for the conservation of threatened species.  Read the full story...

  • A woodpecker perched on a tree with a bug in its mouth
    Information icon A red-cockaded woodpecker has dinner outside its nesting cavity. Photo by USFWS.

    Service announces public hearing on proposed downlisting of red-cockaded woodpecker

    November 12, 2020 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will hold a public hearing on the proposed downlisting of the red-cockaded woodpecker. The virtual public hearing will be held on December 1, 2020 via Zoom and teleconference, in accordance with COVID-19 pandemic public gathering rules. Virtual meetings are also consistent with Service regulations at 50 CFR 424.16©(3). “The Service is committed to transparency in all of our science-based decisions and to the input of stakeholders and the public,” said Service Regional Director Leo Miranda.  Read the full story...

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

    Service finalizes listing the eastern black rail as threatened under the Endangered Species Act

    October 7, 2020 | 4 minute read

    The eastern black rail, a small, secretive marsh bird historically known to exist in 35 states east of the Rocky Mountains, Puerto Rico, Canada, Brazil, and several countries in the Caribbean and Central America, will be listed as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The final listing includes a rule that will help ensure beneficial conservation actions continue, while minimizing impacts to landowners and other stakeholders. Critical habitat designation for the eastern black rail was deemed not prudent.  Read the full story...

  • A woodpecker perched on a tree with a bug in its mouth
    Information icon A red-cockaded woodpecker has dinner outside its nesting cavity. Photo by USFWS.

    Trump Administration proposes downlisting of red-cockaded woodpecker under Endangered Species Act

    September 25, 2020 | 13 minute read

    Fort Benning, Georgia — Secretary of the Interior David L. Bernhardt, Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue and Fort Benning Garrison Commander, Col. Matthew Scalia, were joined by public and private representatives today to celebrate the proposed downlisting of the red-cockaded woodpecker from endangered to threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). In the Southeast, no fewer than eight Army installations, four Air Force installations and one Marine Corps installation all made commitments to recovery goals for red-cockaded woodpeckers, which is a cardinal-sized bird, 8 to 9 inches in height with a sharp beak, living on land they manage.  Read the full story...

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