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Tag: Raleigh Ecological Services Field Office

The content below has been tagged with the term “Raleigh Ecological Services Field Office.”

Articles

  • A beach covered in sea turtle eggs and other debris washed ashore from Hurricane Dorian
    Information icon Debris and sea turtle eggs washed up by Hurricane Dorian at Archie Carr NWR. Photo by Erin Seney, UCF Marine Turtle Research Group.

    Dorian report: Sea-turtle nest losses could have been worse

    September 19, 2019 | 5 minute read

    Hurricane Dorian obliterated hundreds of sea-turtle nests at National Wildlife Refuges as it clawed north along the Atlantic coast earlier this month, officials with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) said. But it could have been much worse. The storm, wildlife refuge staff noted, had dissipated as it neared the fragile, sandy shores where turtles lay eggs. It obliterated some nests, but left others intact. Eroded sand dunes and a lost sea turtle egg at Archie Carr National Wildlife Refuge.  Learn more...

  • Pink flowers with petals in a conical shape and a deep red stigma.
    Information icon Heather Alley near an experimental population she planted for her master thesis. Photo courtesy of Heather Alley.

    With help from many partners, the endangered smooth coneflower fights to come back

    August 16, 2019 | 5 minute read

    Droopy and slender pink petals give it a daisy-like appearance. Delicate, yet fierce, with a tall and spiked-domed center, it thrives in places that aren’t exactly dainty. Along power line rights-of-way, roadsides, dry slopes, and other disturbed places, the smooth coneflower fights to defend its turf. Left unchecked, trees and shrubs can opportunistically overpower the open prairie-like spaces that wildflowers call home. The smooth coneflower is an endangered wild plant in the aster family.  Learn more...

  • Water topples over a 25ft tall dam
    Information icon Hoosier Dam stood 25 feet tall and 235 feet across the Rocky River in Chatham County. It blocked the endangered Cape Fear shiner from reaching habitat upstream from 1922 until October 2018. Photo by Emily Wells, USFWS.

    North Carolina dam removal helps Rocky River and the endangered fish that lives there

    December 6, 2018 | 4 minute read

    The Cape Fear shiner, a federally protected North American minnow found only in central North Carolina, battles to survive with only one stronghold remaining in the lower reaches of the Rocky and Deep Rivers of North Carolina’s Upper Cape Fear River Basin. Many issues have piled up against this little fish, but a massive dam of reinforced concrete, averaging 25 feet tall and 235 feet across stood out, until recently, as a monumental obstacle to the species’ recovery.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A small catfish with brown and white markings and long barbells extending from its mouth.
    Information icon Carolina madtom. Photo by Scott Smith and Fritz Rohde.

    Proposed Endangered Species Act findings for the Carolina madtom and Neuse River waterdog

    May 21, 2019 | 18 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) taking? The Service is proposing to list the Carolina madtom as an endangered species throughout its range and the Neuse River waterdog as a threatened species throughout its range with a 4(d) rule. We are also proposing designation of critical habitat for both species and releasing a draft economic analysis. What is the difference between threatened and endangered species? Under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), an endangered species is currently in danger of becoming extinct throughout all or a significant portion of its range, while a threatened species is likely to become endangered in the foreseeable future.  Learn more...

  • A small black bird flies over a lush green marsh
    Information icon Eastern black rail in flight – Texas, April 2016. Photo © Jesse Huth, used with permission, Huth Avian Services.

    Proposed listing for the eastern black rail

    October 5, 2018 | 12 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is proposing to protect the eastern black rail, a small secretive marsh bird native to the United States, as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Partially migratory, the eastern black rail is known in as many as 36 states, plus multiple territories and countries in the Caribbean and Central and South America. It is one of four subspecies of black rail, which live in salt, brackish, and freshwater marshes.  Learn more...

  • A small, black and white bird flies over ocean waters.
    Information icon Black-capped petrel off the coast of Cape Hatteras, NC. Photo © Brian Patteson, seabirding.com used with permission.

    Proposed listing of the black-capped petrel as threatened

    October 5, 2018 | 4 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is proposing to list the black-capped petrel as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). What is the black-capped petrel? The black-capped petrel is a seabird that breeds on the Caribbean island of Hispaniola, home to Haiti and the Dominican Republic. It travels long distances to forage as far away as open ocean waters off the coast of Virginia.  Learn more...

News

  • Bright red flowers emerge from a bog with a forest in the background.
    Information icon Mountain sweet pitcher plant patch in Butt CPA. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of 53 Southeastern species

    June 20, 2019 | 9 minute read

    As part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of 53 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife, and plants. These species are found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before August, 19, 2019. These five-year reviews will ensure listing classifications under the ESA are accurate and recommend changes in status where appropriate based on the latest science and analysis.  Read the full story...

  • A small catfish with brown and white markings and long barbells extending from its mouth.
    Information icon Carolina madtom. Photo by Scott Smith and Fritz Rohde.

    Carolina madtom and Neuse River waterdog proposed for Endangered Species Act protection

    May 21, 2019 | 5 minute read

    The venom in the stinging spines of the Carolina madtom’s fins is so potent that it earned the freshwater catfish the scientific name, Noturus furiosus. The Neuse River waterdog salamander, with its black spots and red external gills, looks like something out of a science fiction movie. Both species are part of North Carolina’s rich biological heritage, and due to ongoing threats are now only found in limited and shrinking areas of the state.  Read the full story...

  • An inquisitive red wolf looks into the distance.
    Information icon Red wolf (Canis rufus). Photo by Valerie, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    Service extends red wolf review in North Carolina

    November 29, 2018 | 1 minute read

    In light of a federal court ruling issued earlier this month in the Eastern District of North Carolina, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is extending its review of a proposed rule to adapt its management of red wolves in the state. The additional review time will provide the Service the opportunity to fully evaluate the implications of the court decision.  Read the full story...

  • Seven small brownish-yellow mussels held in open hands by a biologist.
    Information icon Atlantic pigtoes ready for release. Photo by USFWS.

    Fish and Wildlife Service proposes threatened status for declining mussel

    October 10, 2018 | 5 minute read

    The Atlantic pigtoe, a freshwater mussel native to waters from Virginia to Georgia, has lost more than half of its historical range, and remaining populations may not be sustainable over time. To help this species and its habitat, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to extend protection for it as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The Service also has identified areas that are essential for conservation of this freshwater mussel and proposes to designate 539 river miles in 16 units as critical habitat.  Read the full story...

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