skip to content

Tag: Pollinators

The content below has been tagged with the term “Pollinators.”

Articles

  • A butterfly covered in white spots with orange and yellow wings perched on a purple flower.
    Information icon A monarch butterfly on a purple plant with bright colors in the background. Photo by Christine Lisiewski.

    Teeing up conservation

    January 29, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Most people view golf courses as swaths of perfectly cropped and contoured grass, closer to artifice than raw nature. As many golfers can attest, however, most of the golf course outside the boundaries of greens and fairways is wild and unruly, and can be a difficult place to locate an errant ball. “About 70 percent of most golf course acreage is managed for out-of-play areas,” said Dr. Kimberly Erusha, managing director of the U.  Learn more...

  • A volunteer removes weeds from a pollinator garden
    Information icon Two volunteers distribute mulch made from invasive Melaleuca trees across the expanded pollinator garden space. Photo by Jessica Sutt, USFWS.

    Friends, plants, and pollinators grow at Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge garden

    October 4, 2018 | 2 minute read

    Inspired by the Service’s pollinator protection initiatives and a butterfly inventory in 2015, members of the Friends of the Florida Panther Refuge formed a committee to begin work on establishing a pollinator garden at Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge. With a new headquarters administrative office site and acres of yard space surrounded by natural habitat, the Friends recognized an opportunity to simultaneously beautify the space, engage volunteers, educate guests, and add beneficial native plants for local pollinators.  Learn more...

  • A small garden with a few small shrubs and plants surrounded by concrete pavers.
    Information icon The butterfly garden at Warm Springs NFH. Photo by Alexander Londono, USFWS.

    Warm Springs butterfly garden gets expansion

    July 17, 2018 | 1 minute read

    Warm Springs National Fish Hatchery in Georgia continues to add to its butterfly garden with the expertise of hatchery manager Carlos Echevarria, who has brought the love of his lifelong hobby to the hatchery garden. With the addition of 83 new plants and 14 different species to the current 32 butterfly milkweeds, the garden will support all types of pollinators and will be a magnificent sight for all to enjoy. This ongoing pollinator restoration program will further help to recover endangered and threatened pollinators such as the the monarch butterfly.  Learn more...

  • Small plants growing out of a low depression next to the parking lot.
    Information icon The completed rain garden basin. Photo by Moria Painter, USFWS.

    New rain garden and outdoor classroom at Wolf Creek

    August 1, 2017 | 3 minute read

    Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery has completed its new onsite rain garden and outdoor classroom, a project that began in late March. This project was no easy feat, requiring substantial assistance from partnerships with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Wolf Creek Dam and Powerhouse, and the University of Kentucky Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering. A rain garden is a shallow depression, planted with native plants and grasses, which is designed to capture runoff from nearby impervious surfaces.  Learn more...

  • A biologist showing off a Louisiana pinsnake.
    Information icon Thomas Athens (Center), David Castellanos, and Sharna Tolfree introduce Luigi, the Louisiana pinesnake, to Family Adventure Day participants. Photo by Angela Trahan, USFWS.

    Family adventure day in Louisiana

    May 3, 2017 | 1 minute read

    On March 11, 2017, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Louisiana Ecological Services Office and the Baton Rouge Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office participated in the Healing House’s Family Adventure Day fundraiser and community outreach event in Lafayette, Louisiana. The Healing House provides support for children grieving the loss of a loved one. The Service’s station was one of 43 activity locations that families could visit throughout Lafayette. More than 250 participants selected the Service’s activity as one of their adventures.  Learn more...

Podcasts

  • A monarch butterfly perched on a bushy plant with bright yellow flowers.
    Monarch fueling up for migration. Photo by Lilibeth Serrano, USFWS.

    Pollinator garden success

    August 31, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature Staff at the Asheville-based non-profit Monarch Rescue recently reported that monarch butterfly eggs and caterpillars were found at a pollinator garden they worked with students to install at Yancey County’s Mountain Heritage High School. The high-school pollinator garden is one of 100 sties recently added to the Rosalynn Carter Butterfly Trial. The trail, established in April 2013, raises awareness of the monarch’s plight and encourages the conservation of butterflies and their habitats.  Learn more...

  • A butterfly covered in white spots with orange and yellow wings perched on a purple flower.
    Information icon A monarch butterfly on a purple plant with bright colors in the background. Photo by Christine Lisiewski.

    Tennessee supports monarchs

    June 8, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Features. On the heels of numerous pollinator gardens being installed in western North Carolina, the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency has announced a major effort to help save monarch butterflies. The agency, along with the National Wildlife Federation, Tennessee Wildlife Federation, Tennessee Parks and Greenways Foundation, Mississippi River Corridor and The Nature Conservancy are partnering with Roundstone Native Seed Company to save the butterflies.  Learn more...

  • A colorful garden desinged to attract pollinators
    Pollinator garden. Photo by USFWS.

    Take action for pollinators

    February 1, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. There’s a long list of reasons why we should protect our biodiversity – the variety of genes, species, and natural communities found in our world. One reason that’s becoming increasingly understood and appreciated is that biodiversity protects ecosystem services. Ecosystem services is a somewhat obtuse way to describe all those things the natural world does for us – from plants producing oxygen to wetlands cleaning water.  Learn more...

  • Bright red flowers emerge from a bog with a forest in the background.
    Mountain sweet pitcher plant patch in Butt CPA. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Southern Appalachian poaching

    January 30, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. It seems this winter has seen a flurry of activity in the capture and prosecution of wildlife smugglers. In mid-December a German man was arrested for smuggling hundreds of live tarantulas, including protected species, into the United States through the U.S. mail. In late December two smugglers plead guilty to breaking federal law in connection to their attempt to smuggle Cuban pigeon eggs into the country, running the risk of bringing avian disease into the United States.  Learn more...

Wildlife-and-You

  • A familiar yellow and black colored honey bee on a bright purple flower.
    A honeybee from the People’s Garden Apiary visits the perennial "catnip" in the herb garden of USDA Headquarters People’s Garden.

    Bring Back the Bees

    There’s been a lot of buzz about bees lately, with scientists discussing concerns for their dwindling populations. But why are these winged insects so important, and how can we help them?  Learn more...

Contact Us:

Looking for a media contact? Reach out to a regional spokesperson.

Share this page

Tweet this page on Twitter or follow @USFWSsoutheast

Share this page on Facebook or follow USFWSsoutheast.

LinkedIn

Share this page on LinkedIn