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Tag: Poaching

The content below has been tagged with the term “Poaching.”

Articles

  • Buckets of green, orange and yellow berries in large buckets and bags in the back of a pickup truck bed.
    Information icon Confiscated berries at Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Pamela Garrison, USFWS.

    Berry big business

    July 31, 2020 | 7 minute read

    Folkston, Georgia — The thieves, armed with machetes, travel in packs targeting unsuspecting communities with chilling precision. Sometimes, they’ll hit in the dead of night wearing headlamps as they slink deeper into the forest. Lookouts prowl the roadways alerting the criminals via phone or radio if the authorities approach. Then, with bags full of ill-gotten gains worth thousands of dollars, the bad guys abscond to the next ill-prepared community.  Learn more...

  • A cluster of carnivorious plant heads with bright red/orange mouths.
    Information icon Venus flytrap. Photo by Jennifer Koches, USFWS.

    Buyer beware: Do not buy poached Venus flytrap plants

    June 17, 2020 | 4 minute read

    Venus flytrap is North Carolina’s official carnivorous plant. Throughout the world, it is recognized as an iconic insect-eating plant and is a popular potted plant that has captured our imaginations. The Venus flytrap is endemic to North and South Carolina, but it has been introduced to a few other states. Unfortunately, in the wild, populations continue to decline. The North Carolina Plant Conservation Program lists the Venus flytrap as a species of Special Concern-Vulnerable in North Carolina, and poaching of this plant became a felony in 2014.  Learn more...

Podcasts

  • A huge bin of crushed ivory pieces.
    Crushing our ivory sends a message to ivory traffickers and their customers that the United States will not tolerate this illegal trade. Photo by Kate Miyamoto, USFWS.

    Turn in poachers

    February 22, 2016 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Poaching isn’t just about the illegal harvest of elephant tusks and rhino horns – it can be a serious issue here in the southern Appalachians, impacting game animals, hurting the chances of recovering endangered species, and affecting our ability to continue harvesting traditional forest products like ginseng. The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission has a new program to help cut animal poaching by rewarding members of the public who report suspicious activity or provide knowledge related to wildlife poaching that results in a conviction.  Learn more...

  • A low-growing green plant with a flower forming.
    Ginseng flower forming. Photo by Forest Farming, CC BY-ND 2.0.

    Poaching our natural heritage

    March 16, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature The common name ginseng refers to several species in the Panax genus, including Panax ginseng, found in east Asia, and Panax quinquefolius, often called American ginseng, found here in the United States. Both are used in traditional Chinese medicine. American ginseng has been harvested from the southern Appalachians and sold to Chinese markets for generations. Unfortunately wild ginseng fetches the highest prices, and harvesting wild ginseng has proved unsustainable.  Learn more...

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