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Tag: Pisgah National Forest

The content below has been tagged with the term “Pisgah National Forest.”

Articles

  • A woman wearing a warm hat preparing to plant a tiny spruce tree seedling.
    Information icon Sue Cameron plants a red spruce at Whigg Meadow in Tennessee. Photo by Garry Peeples, USFWS.

    Women lead the effort on Appalachian mountain-top forests

    May 24, 2018 | 8 minute read

    The story of an ambitious effort to restore red spruce to the Southern Appalachians spearheaded by four women brought together by a commitment to the highest peaks east of the Mississippi River.  Learn more...

Podcasts

  • Water flows through a lush green forest
    Cold Springs Creek runs through Pisgah National Forest. Photo by Jim Liestman, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    Pisgah National Forest restoration

    December 8, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Nearly 6,000 acres of Pisgah National Forest’s Grandfather Ranger District were restored this past year, thanks to the help of numerous partners. The Grandfather district is a 192,000-acre portion of the forest, stretching from Old Fort to Blowing Rock. The 6,000-acre effort is part of the 10-year restoration effort that will touch 40,000 acres. The project is restoring fire-adapted ecosystems, increasing stream health, controlling non-native species and protecting hemlocks against hemlock woolly adelgids.  Learn more...

  • A low-growing green plant with a flower forming.
    Ginseng flower forming. Photo by Forest Farming, CC BY-ND 2.0.

    New rules for ginseng permits

    October 21, 2013 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Citing concerns over declines in wild ginseng, the supervisor of the Pisgah and Nantahala National Forests is limiting ginseng harvest in those areas. A permit is required to harvest wild ginseng on National Forests, and it must be collected during a designated harvest season. Some of this year’s changes include: The number of annual permits issued will be reduced to 136 permits, a 75 percent reduction from recent years.  Learn more...

  • A large elk with huge antlers walking in a grassy field with a forest in the background
    Elk. Photo by Stephen Baker, BLM.

    Information sought on elk death

    April 18, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Elk once roamed the southern Appalachian Mountains and the eastern United States before over-harvesting extirpated them from the area in the late 1700’s. The experimental release of elk into the Great Smoky Mountains, which began in 2001 with a population of 25 elk, has been successful. To this point, the population has been growing and the park has been monitoring the herd with the assistance of radio collars.  Learn more...

  • Thousands of bats flying together at dusk.
    Information icon Bats flying. Photo by Ann Froschauer, USFWS.

    Bat blitz

    August 15, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The first bat was caught just as night set in, nearly immediately after biologists set the fine net designed to ensnare bats before they could sense its presence. Biologists immediately pulled the bat from the net and began the process of collecting data from it. Species, gender, and general age were determined. It was weighed. Wings were checked for damage – a sign of the deadly bat disease white-nose syndrome.  Learn more...

  • A furry brown bat baring its teeth.
    Tri-colored bat from the 2011 bat blitz. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Bat blitz 2011

    November 3, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. In a tiny meeting room in Nebo, North Carolina, at the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, planning began in earnest for the 2011 Bat Blitz – an effort that will bring dozens of biologists from across the Southeast to North Carolina’s Avery County for an intensive three days of collecting information on the area’s bat populations. Nearly 10 years old, the bat blitz is becoming a tradition among southern biologists.  Learn more...

  • A man looks out over mountains and valleys covered with lush green trees
    Enjoying a clear view from Clawhammer Mountain. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Hiking Clawhammer Mountain

    September 1, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Clawhammer Mountain, in Pisgah National Forest, forms part of the dividing line between the Davidson River Valley to the south and the Mills River Valley to the North. Both of these watersheds host some of the most popular trout fishing spots in western North Carolina, while the Mills River system is a source of drinking water for Hendersonville and Asheville, and home to the endangered Appalachian elktoe, a freshwater mussel.  Learn more...

  • A whimsical photo from a valley looking up at a mountain surrounded by swirling clouds.
    Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Photo by The Shared Experience, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    100th anniversary of the Weeks Act

    August 18, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. In much heralded celebrations, Great Smoky Mountains National Park celebrated their 75th anniversary last year and the Blue Ridge Parkway is currently celebrating their 75th anniversary. As important as those are, next year brings an even bigger anniversary – the event that led to the creation of the National Forests in the Eastern U.S. 2011 marks the 100th anniversary of the Weeks Act, the law that authorized the federal government to purchase land and establish national forests in the Eastern United States.  Learn more...

  • Protection of the McElrath property helps protect an important stream and national forest

    April 10, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings, and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. We wanted our oldest daughter’s first camping trip to be close to home in case panic struck in the middle of the night and to limit time cooped up in a car. We also wanted plenty of opportunity for childhood exploration - always better if water is present. We arrived at the North Mills River recreation area, near the Asheville airport, on a Saturday afternoon to find the campground full.  Learn more...

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