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Tag: Piping Plover

The content below has been tagged with the term “Piping Plover.”

Articles

  • A marsh at low tide exposes a mud flat with sparse pine trees in the distance.
    Information icon Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Nanciann Regalado, USFWS.

    Coastal Alabama refuge adds land

    April 26, 2019 | 3 minute read

    A jewel of an ecosystem just grew by more than 350 football fields, thanks to a partnership between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) and several partners. The land in question: the Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge, a roughly 7,000-acre tract near Gulf Shores, Alabama. It’s called the Little Point Clear Unit — two parcels comprising 470 acres, enough land to accommodate 355 football games. It became a formal part of the refuge April 26.  Learn more...

  • Hundreds of shore birds line a sand bank with yellow oil boom in the background.
    Information icon North Breton Island, like many barrier islands, provides habitat for a wide range of bird species. Photo by Greg Thompson, USFWS.

    Restoring a buffet for birds on North Breton Island

    February 6, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Any mention of Louisiana frequently d conjures up images of delicious Cajun and Creole food – po’boys, gumbo, jambalaya and more. “Barrier islands” probably won’t pop into most people’s heads. But these islands are vitally important because they protect Louisiana communities from the impact of storms by acting like speed bumps, absorbing wind and wave energy. In addition, they provide essential habitat for birds and other wildlife. North Breton Island, part of the Breton National Wildlife Refuge, is one such barrier island.  Learn more...

  • A photo of the shore from the water with a bright white lighthouse, a large wooden dock and numerous palm and desiduous trees.
    Information icon Egmont Key. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    The sea and the Key

    September 27, 2018 | 9 minute read

    Egmont Key, Florida — The history of this spit of an island is without parallel. Sadly, the Key itself could soon be history. Native Americans, for example, hunted the island at the mouth of Tampa Bay centuries ago. Spanish explorers mapped it in the 1500s. Billy Bowlegs and Polly Parker, Seminole Indian legends, were imprisoned here during the so-called Third Seminole War. Palms on the key’s western beach killed by the rising, salty gulf waters.  Learn more...

  • hundreds of birds dot a small island below a bright blue sky.
    Information icon DOI is leading a $72 million restoration of Breton Island off the coast of Louisiana that will benefit brown pelicans, terns, skimmers and gulls. Photo by Brian Spears, USFWS.

    Preconstruction monitoring activities kick off on North Breton Island Louisiana

    August 3, 2018 | 2 minute read

    Staff working to restore bird habitat on North Breton Island recently began scientific testing of the sand and invertebrates that live there, to prepare for the upcoming construction phase. The island’s restoration is one part of our ambitious, $318 million Louisiana Outer Coast Restoration Project. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and U.S Geologic Survey biologists took sand samples to study and determine the abundance and species composition of the worms, crustaceans and other invertebrates that call the island’s shoreline home.  Learn more...

  • The sun sets over a lush green marsh cut in half by a calm brackish channel.
    Information icon Salt marsh along the Altamaha River. Photo by Nicole Vidal, USFWS.

    Many partners work together to protect “the Amazon of the South” for generations to come

    July 12, 2017 | 13 minute read

    It meanders 137 miles through the wild heart of Georgia, a blackwater beauty that nourishes longleaf pine forests, cypress swamps, saltwater estuaries and the barrier islands that protect the Atlantic coast and migratory birds alike.  Learn more...

  • A head-on photograph of two grey fighter jets flying in formation with a blue sky and clouds in the background.
    Information icon Two F-22 Raptors from Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla., fly in formation. Photo by Senior Master Sgt. Thomas Meneguin, U.S. Air Force.

    Biologists on bases: Fish and Wildlife joins the military

    April 26, 2017 | 6 minute read

    Melanie Kaeser is embedded with the military at Tyndall Air Force Base. She patrols the pine forests and swampy wetlands as F-16s and F-22s maneuver overhead. Her mission: protect those in harm’s way - the gopher tortoises, the St. Andrews Beach mice and the Godfrey’s butterworts.  Learn more...

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