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Tag: Pine Rocklands

The content below has been tagged with the term “Pine Rocklands.”

News

  • An iridescent insect with many small hairs on its belly standing on leaf litter and sandy soil

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to list Miami tiger beetle as endangered

    October 4, 2016 | 4 minute readVERO BEACH, FL – The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is listing the Miami tiger beetle as “endangered” under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), meaning the beetle is in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range now or in the foreseeable future. The listing of the Miami tiger beetle as endangered becomes effective on November 4, 2016, 30 days after its publication on October 5, 2016, in the Federal Register. Read the full story...

    Miami tiger beetle. Photo by Jonathan Mays, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

  • An iridescent insect with many small hairs on its belly standing on leaf litter and sandy soil

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes to list Miami tiger beetle as endangered

    December 18, 2015 | 5 minute readVERO BEACH, FL – The Miami tiger beetle was considered extinct until 2007, when a small population was discovered near Zoo Miami. Now the distinctive beetle with a shiny dark green back is only known to survive in two separate, very small populations in Miami’s disappearing pine rocklands—one in the Richmond Pine Rocklands and another discovered this year a few miles from there and separated by urban development. Because of the Miami tiger beetle’s rarity and the threats its remaining pine rockland habitat faces from urban development pressures, the U. Read the full story...

    Miami tiger beetle. Photo by Jonathan Mays, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

Wildlife

  • An iridescent insect with many small hairs on its belly standing on leaf litter and sandy soil

    Miami tiger beetle

    The Miami tiger beetle, found exclusively in pine rockland habitat in Miami-Dade County, Florida, has a shiny green exterior and protected under the Endangered Species Act as endangered. Visit the species profile...

    Miami tiger beetle. Photo by Jonathan Mays, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

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