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Tag: Pennsylvania

The content below has been tagged with the term “Pennsylvania.”

Faq

  • A bright white flower similar to a hydrangea emerges from a leafy green plant
    Information icon Running buffalo clover. Photo by USFWS.

    Proposal to remove running buffalo clover from the list of endangered species

    August 26, 2019 | 5 minute read

    What action is the Service taking with the running buffalo clover? The Service is proposing to remove Endangered Species Act protection for the running buffalo clover. The proposed rule to delist the running buffalo clover published in the Federal Register on August 27, 2019. Before making a final decision on the delisting proposal, the Service must gather and analyze public comments and any new information. Publication of the proposed rule opens a 60-day public comment period, which closes on October 28, 2019.  Learn more...

  • A small black bird flies over a lush green marsh
    Information icon Eastern black rail in flight – Texas, April 2016. Photo © Jesse Huth, used with permission, Huth Avian Services.

    Proposed listing for the eastern black rail

    October 5, 2018 | 12 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is proposing to protect the eastern black rail, a small secretive marsh bird native to the United States, as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Partially migratory, the eastern black rail is known in as many as 36 states, plus multiple territories and countries in the Caribbean and Central and South America. It is one of four subspecies of black rail, which live in salt, brackish, and freshwater marshes.  Learn more...

News

  • A small yellow breasted bird with grey feathers.
    Information icon Kirtland’s warblers nest exclusively in jack pine stands. Photo by Joel Trick, USFWS.

    Partners celebrate successful recovery of beloved songbird

    October 8, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Bird enthusiasts from around the world travel to northern Michigan in hopes of catching sight of a Kirtland’s warbler, a small songbird once poised on the brink of extinction. Now the species is thriving thanks to decades of effort by a diverse group of dedicated partners. Due to the species’ remarkable recovery, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced that it no longer warrants protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).  Read the full story...

  • A bright white flower similar to a hydrangea emerges from a leafy green plant
    Information icon Running buffalo clover. Photo by USFWS.

    Eastern plant once thought extinct now recovered: federal protection no longer needed

    August 26, 2019 | 2 minute read

    Once thought extinct, running buffalo clover, a perennial plant native to parts of the eastern United States, is thriving and is now considered recovered. The change in status for the clover came about thanks to a number of state, federal and private conservation partners working together for over three decades. Because of their efforts, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is now proposing to remove Endangered Species Act (ESA) protections for the species.  Read the full story...

  • A small, blue and yellow fish floating above rocky substrate
    Information icon Tippecanoe darter. Photo © Robert Criswell, used with permission.

    Tiny freshwater fish does not warrant federal protection

    December 18, 2018 | 3 minute read

    After a thorough scientific review, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that populations of the Tippecanoe darter, a small freshwater fish, do not warrant federal protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). In some places, surveys suggest increasing populations, likely due to improvements in water quality. One of the smallest darters in the world, the Tippecanoe darter continues to be found across its historical range in larger streams and rivers of the Ohio River watershed in Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and West Virginia.  Read the full story...

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

    Service proposes to list the eastern black rail as threatened under the Endangered Species Act

    October 5, 2018 | 5 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and its partners are working to protect a small, secretive marsh bird that is in steep decline. Some populations of the eastern black rail along the Atlantic coast have dropped by as much as 90 percent, and with a relatively small total population remaining across the eastern United States, the Service is proposing to list the subspecies as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).  Read the full story...

Wildlife

  • A colorful green/brown and red trout covered in small red spots.
    Information icon A wildlife biologist holds a small eastern brook trout. Photo by Steve Droter, Chesapeake Bay Program.

    Brook trout

    The brook trout is a fish native to the eastern United States, and is often referred to as speckled trout, spotted trout, brookie, and squaretail. “Brookies” are considered an indicator species, because they help indicate the health or overall quality of the waters they inhabit.  Visit the species profile...

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

    Eastern black rail

    Black rails are the smallest rails in North America. One of four recognized subspecies of black rail, the eastern black rail is perhaps the most secretive. This small inhabitant of shallow salt and freshwater marshes is rarely seen and has a distinctive “kick-ee-doo” call that is often heard at night.  Visit the species profile...

  • Male and female mallard ducks on a lake
    Information icon Mallards at Morris Wetland Management District in Minnesota. Photo by Alex Galt, USFWS.

    Mallard

    Taxon: Anseriformes, Anatidae Range: Mallards occur year-round throughout North America, but most individuals are migratory and breed in the northern United States and Canada and winter in the Southern United States and Mexico. Most of the breeding population occurs in the Prairie Pothole Region of the north-central United States and central Canada. Status: Not listed, low concern – In 2018, the breeding population size exceeded 10 million in the traditional and eastern survey areas of North America.  Visit the species profile...

  • Eight northern pintails including two females and six males on a cold, winter lake
    Information icon Northern pintails at Tennessee National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Clayton Ferrell, USFWS.

    Northern pintail

    Taxon: Anseriformes, Anatidae Range: Northern pintail typically breed in the Prairie Pothole Region of the north-central United States, central Canada, and Alaska. They spend their winters in the southern United States and Mexico, especially along the Texas and Louisiana coasts of the Gulf of Mexico. Status: Not listed, low concern – More than 2.3 million northern pintail were estimated in the breeding population in 2018. However, substantial declines since the 1950s has resulted in restricted harvest regulations for this species.  Visit the species profile...

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