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Tag: Partnership

The content below has been tagged with the term “Partnership.”

Articles

  • A many wearing a wide-brimmed hat walking through a forest next to a young longleaf pine seedling.

    Longleaf pine for Georgians

    August 22, 2017 | 9 minute readLongleaf pine trees once blanketed the landscape from southern Virginia to east Texas. They were majestic hallmarks of the Southeast. Learn more...

    Reese Thompson is working with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and others to conserve a natural longleaf pine stand on his south Georgia land. Photo by Bill O’Brian, USFWS.

  • A rocky stream bed covered by a canopy of trees.

    Life in Proctor Creek

    August 9, 2017 | 4 minute readThere’s a stillness that only nature can provide, and the flowing stream is a peaceful break from the sounds of city life. “We’re here to show folks that there’s life in Proctor Creek. That even in urban settings there is nature and wildlife that needs protecting,” Johnson said. Learn more...

    Rocks and boulders line the bottom and banks of this stretch of proctor creek. Photo by Katherine Taylor, USFWS.

  • Wiry pine trees sparsley dot a sandy landscape.

    A harmonious future for profits, pine and at-risk species along the Florida-Alabama line

    May 9, 2017 | 7 minute readPace, Florida — Longleaf pine forests once covered 90 million acres from Virginia to Texas, a bio-diverse swath of timber prized by shipbuilders and gopher tortoises alike. Sprawling cities, large farms and commercial pine plantations, though, replaced much of the longleaf habitat. Today, less than five million acres remain. Conservationists’ goal of eight million acres by 2025 seemed laughable. Until Resource Management Service and Jimmy Bullock came along. Map of the Coastal Headwaters Forest by the Conservation Fund and RMS. Learn more...

    A field of young longleaf pine at the Coastal Headwaters Forest. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

  • A group of children runs through shallow water with a net in the foreground.

    Conserving the Tennessee River Basin: it takes a village

    April 11, 2017 | 3 minute readFor Shannon O’Quinn, a watershed specialist at the Tennessee Valley Authority, the Tennessee River provides much more than a livelihood. “It is a special place to my family,” he says. “It is where we live and play and work to ensure the river stays healthy for people and wildlife.” Considering that the Tennessee River Basin is one of the most biologically diverse watersheds in North America, that’s a critically important job. Learn more...

    Collecting fish in the North Toe River. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

Endangered-Species-Act

Gulf-Restoration

  • A beige landscape dotted with small lakes and wetlands yields to several arrays of large wind turbines.

    A Gulf-Wide Restoration Perspective

    The Service Gulf Restoration staff works with partners and others to ensure a coordinated, strategic approach to the restoration of the Gulf of Mexico watershed. Learn more...

    In the United States, the Gulf of Mexico watershed reaches as far north as the Prairie Pothole region. This wind farm is located among some of region’s “potholes” found along the North and South Dakota border. Photo by Krista Lundgren, USFWS.

  • A brown and black feathered bird with a long narrow beak floating on ultra-smooth water.

    Our Vision

    The Service collaborates with partners and other stakeholders to conserve, protect and enhance the fish, wildlife, plants and habitat of the Gulf of Mexico region. Learn more...

    Dowitchers are long-range migrants that use a distinctive sewing machine-like feeding action when foraging across the mud flats of the Gulf region. Photo by Woody Woodrow, USFWS.

  • A lush green coastal landscape with colorful sky at dusk.  A barge is barely visible in the distance.

    Partnerships: Landscape Conservation Cooperatives

    The Service collaborates with partners and other stakeholders to conserve, protect and enhance the fish, wildlife, plants and habitat of the Gulf of Mexico region. Learn more...

    LCC partners know that landscapes such as this Gulf cordgrass prairie require science-based conservation actions that take into account the effects of current and future environmental stresses. Photo by Woody Woodrow, USFWS.

News

  • Bright green needles emerge from a central cone of a longleaf pine tree

    Seeing the forest for the trees

    April 6, 2016 | 3 minute readMore than 30 animal species that depend on longleaf pine forests are federally listed as endangered or threatened, and many more are considered to be at-risk. This is why the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with partners to restore longleaf pine across the southeastern United States. Read the full story...

    Longleaf pine needles. Photo by Dot Paul, USDA NRCS.

Science

  • Two biologists hold a net in a small stream.

    Partnerships

    The Service’s mission is “working with others, to conserve, protect and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people”. We recognize that we can’t do this work alone. To achieve our mission, the Service depends on partnerships with federal, state, non-government entities, and individuals. Research conducted within the Service and through our scientific partnerships (highlighted below) helps ensure that our decisions can be informed by sound science. Learn more...

    Seining on the Cane River in North Carolina. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

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