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Tag: Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program

The content below has been tagged with the term “Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program.”

Articles

  • A small, colorful fish with yellow body and bright blue and orange fins
    Information icon Yazoo darter. Photo by Matt Wagner, MDWFP.

    Yazoo darter habitat conservation on working lands in Mississippi

    May 31, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Water Valley, Mississippi – The Reid farm, approximately 400 acres in size, is a typical family owned row crop operation in northeast Mississippi. The farm is located just off Highway 315 a few miles away from the picturesque town of Water Valley. The primary crops produced here are soybeans, corn, and potatoes. The countryside mostly consists of rolling hills of loblolly pine and hardwood drainages with cattle pastures and row crop agricultural fields widely interspersed.  Learn more...

  • Ten plus monarch butterflies perched on a single yellow plant.
    Information icon Monarch butterflies gathering in Chenier Plain coastal prairie. Photo by Woody Woodrow, USFWS.

    Monarchs on the ranch

    April 18, 2019 | 3 minute read

    Perryville, Arkansas — Diamond TR Ranch is a 340-acre working ranch located on Arkansas Highway 10 west of Little Rock. The ranch is divided by the Maumelle River which provides 95 percent of the input for Lake Maumelle, a source of drinking water for about 450,000 residents of central Arkansas. When I first pulled up to the ranch I was greeted by a man who had clearly been up since before sunrise.  Learn more...

  • water topels over a foot drop after a dam was removed on the Sucarnoochee River.
    Information icon Native fishes and mussels can move upstream after removal of Livingston Dam in Alabama. Photo by Eric Spadgenske, USFWS.

    Livingston Dam: A restoration story

    April 10, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Livingston, Alabama — The Sucarnoochee River is a sleepy coastal plain river that snakes its way through the Black Belt (the band of fertile soil crossing central Alabama and northeast Mississippi), near the University of West Alabama. The ‘nooch has only been studied by a handful of scientists and is not well known as a major tourist destination. Home to unique animals with comparably unique names, like bankclimber, fawnsfoot, Alabama orb, bluehead chub, and naked sand darter, this river contributes to the state of Alabama’s depth of aquatic biodiversity.  Learn more...

  • A bright green irrodescent fish in a small blue net.
    Information icon Barrens topminnows are small, colorful fish that live only in a few springs and creeks in central Tennessee. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed listing the fish as endangered. Photo by Emily Granstaff, USFWS.

    A boost in the Barrens

    February 27, 2019 | 3 minute read

    Barrens topminnows are small, colorful fish about four inches long, and the males are particularly showy during spawning season. Barrens darters are even smaller, and they are believed to be one of the rarest fish in North America. Cumberland pigtoes are mussels with mahogany shells and peach interiors. The fish and mussels are struggling to survive in the only place they live: the creeks and watersheds in a little part of Tennessee called the Barrens, midway between Nashville and Chattanooga.  Learn more...

  • A butterfly covered in white spots with orange and yellow wings perched on a purple flower.
    Information icon A monarch butterfly on a purple plant with bright colors in the background. Photo by Christine Lisiewski.

    Teeing up conservation

    January 29, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Most people view golf courses as swaths of perfectly cropped and contoured grass, closer to artifice than raw nature. As many golfers can attest, however, most of the golf course outside the boundaries of greens and fairways is wild and unruly, and can be a difficult place to locate an errant ball. “About 70 percent of most golf course acreage is managed for out-of-play areas,” said Dr. Kimberly Erusha, managing director of the U.  Learn more...

  • A hillside with debris and trees snapped in half like twigs.
    Information icon A portion of Jose Roig’s coffee plantation immediately after Hurricane Maria struck. Photo by USFWS.

    Aid in the shade

    August 9, 2018 | 4 minute read

    In September 2017, Puerto Rico was already reeling from Hurricane Irma, which had doused it with torrential rains and caused widespread damage. Then, two weeks later, Hurricane Maria roared through, killing hundreds of residents, wiping out buildings, entire landscapes of vegetation, and practically the entire electrical grid. It was the worst natural disaster on record for the U.S. commonwealth island, which is still recovering from the Category 4 storm.  Learn more...

  • Aerial photo of the education center with colorful fields of flowers and a red visitors center.
    Information icon The Fred Berry Conservation Education Center in Arkansas sits on 21 acres donated by a retired schoolteacher. The center is restoring some of the land to native grassland/savanna habitat with funding provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program. Photo by Arkansas Game and Fish Commission.

    One project, many outcomes

    February 28, 2018 | 3 minute read

    One of the great things about habitat improvement projects is that a seemingly simple project can lead to many conservation outcomes. That has been the case with the native grassland restoration project on the Fred Berry Conservation Education Center, located on Crooked Creek in Marion County, Arkansas. The 421-acre property, which is managed by the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission (AGFC), lies within a long 2.75-mile bend of Crooked Creek, a premier smallmouth bass stream, in the Arkansas Ozarks.  Learn more...

Caribbean

  • Puerto Rican mountains covered in vegetation.
    Information icon Yauco, Puerto Rico. Photo by Jennifer Valentín, USFWS.

    Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program

    The Caribbean Ecological Services Field Office promotes healthy wildlife and their habitat through a diverse group of programs: Endangered Species, Partners for Fish and Wildlife, Contaminants Program, Coastal Program and Project Evaluation.  Learn more...

Lafayette

  • A gentleman kneels down in an agricultural field.
    James Bradshaw, owner of Bradshaw Tree Inc. of Mississippi, planted the trees on Upper Ouachita NWR in northern Louisiana. Photo by Sean Gardner.

    For private landowners

    Partners for Fish and Wildlife program A large percentage of the land in Louisiana is privately owned. Without conservation efforts on private lands, our trust resources would simply not survive. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s (Service) Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program supports landowners who may lack the technical and financial support necessary to manage their land for wildlife. Partners for Fish and Wildlife is the primary mechanism for delivering voluntary habitat improvement projects on private lands for the benefit of federal trust species (such as migratory birds or migratory fish), endangered or threatened species, or any other at-risk species.  Learn more...

News

  • A close-up shot of a small fish with a black line along it’s side and a bright red tip on it’s dorsal fin.
    Information icon Ashy darter. Photo by Conservation Fisheries, Inc.

    Thanks to conservation partnerships, two southeastern fish and a snail do not warrant Endangered Species Act protection

    April 3, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Following extensive scientific reviews, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that three southeastern animals do not face the threat of extinction now or in the foreseeable future. Accordingly, the ashy darter, Barrens darter and Arkansas mudalia snail do not warrant Endangered Species Act (ESA) protection. For each animal, the Service brought together a team of biologists who compiled and examined all known data and research. Their peer-reviewed findings are outlined in species status assessments (SSAs), made available today.  Read the full story...

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