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Tag: Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program

The content below has been tagged with the term “Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program.”

Articles

  • A hillside with debris and trees snapped in half like twigs.

    Aid in the shade

    August 9, 2018 | 4 minute readIn September 2017, Puerto Rico was already reeling from Hurricane Irma, which had doused it with torrential rains and caused widespread damage. Then, two weeks later, Hurricane Maria roared through, killing hundreds of residents, wiping out buildings, entire landscapes of vegetation, and practically the entire electrical grid. It was the worst natural disaster on record for the U.S. commonwealth island, which is still recovering from the Category 4 storm. Learn more...

    A portion of Jose Roig’s coffee plantation immediately after Hurricane Maria struck. Photo by USFWS.

  • Aerial photo of the education center with colorful fields of flowers and a red visitors center.

    One project, many outcomes

    February 28, 2018 | 3 minute readOne of the great things about habitat improvement projects is that a seemingly simple project can lead to many conservation outcomes. That has been the case with the native grassland restoration project on the Fred Berry Conservation Education Center, located on Crooked Creek in Marion County, Arkansas. The 421-acre property, which is managed by the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission (AGFC), lies within a long 2.75-mile bend of Crooked Creek, a premier smallmouth bass stream, in the Arkansas Ozarks. Learn more...

    The Fred Berry Conservation Education Center in Arkansas sits on 21 acres donated by a retired schoolteacher. The center is restoring some of the land to native grassland/savanna habitat with funding provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program. Photo by Arkansas Game and Fish Commission.

  • Three Native American men stand in front of a sign.

    Woven from the Landscape

    January 23, 2018 | 4 minute readBefore the United States was settled by Europeans, longleaf pine forests covered about 90 million acres of the Southeast. Most of these forests were logged for turpentine and lumber, and by 1975 they had been reduced to about 5 million acres. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is working with countless private landowners, state and federal agencies and conservation groups, to restore the glory of the longleaf. The motivation for many of these conservationists is to help the many at-risk and endangered birds and wildlife that thrive in longleaf forests from the red-cockaded woodpecker to the gopher tortoise. Learn more...

    Coushatta Tribe members (from left) Bertney Langley, Ernest Sickey and Gardner Rose show a sign that honors the habitat restoration partnership between the tribe and the Service. Photo courtesy of the Coushatta Tribe.

  • An employee in a neon yellow shirt helps guide a heavy machine operator.

    Culvert repair partnership in Tennessee a win-win for landowner, endangered fish

    October 24, 2017 | 3 minute readThe little laurel dace, which grows to less than two inches long, is a freshwater minnow found in only six small streams on Walden’s Ridge, part of the Cumberland Plateau in central Tennessee. The federally endangered laurel dace. Photo by Conservation Fisheries, Inc. During their breeding season in May and June, both males and females exhibit stunning colors of black, gold, silver, and red. The laurel dace lives in pools and slow runs in clear, cool streams that are surrounded by dense riverbanks covered in mountain laurel. Learn more...

    Cory Gullett (USFWS), a member of the Aquatic Habitat Restoration Team, helps to position the new culvert into place as it is lifted by an excavator. Photo by Bryan Watkins, USFWS.

  • Purple/grey and bright orange flowers bloom in a grassy field.

    Partners join to conserve rare prairie barrens in Kentucky

    August 31, 2017 | 3 minute readMonarch butterflies descend on the fields in droves, drawn by the abundance of milkweed, their favorite pollinator plant. Endangered northern long-eared and Indiana bats swoop through the sky. On the ground, biodiversity abounds, with rare plants like scurf pea and false gromwell. This little Eden - 160 acres now owned by the non-profit Southern Conservation Corps (SCC) – is a combination of forest and extremely rare prairie barrens habitat in Garrard County, a mostly rural county in central Kentucky. Learn more...

    Two species of milkweed, common and butterfly, grow wild in the barrens. Milkweed is a favorite plant of monarch butterflies. Photo by J. Brent Harrel, USFWS.

  • A many wearing a wide-brimmed hat walking through a forest next to a young longleaf pine seedling.

    Longleaf pine for Georgians

    August 22, 2017 | 9 minute readLongleaf pine trees once blanketed the landscape from southern Virginia to east Texas. They were majestic hallmarks of the Southeast. Learn more...

    Reese Thompson is working with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and others to conserve a natural longleaf pine stand on his south Georgia land. Photo by Bill O’Brian, USFWS.

  • Two finely manicured hands reach for a tiny gopher tortoise hiding in its shell on sandy soil.

    Florida couple dedicates property to conservation

    July 20, 2017 | 2 minute readBen and LouAnn Williams own approximately 3,400 acres of pinelands interspersed with bottomland hardwoods in Putnam County, Florida, between Jacksonville and Daytona Beach. Their property contributes to conservation on a regional scale because it is adjacent to publicly owned conservation areas, creating an important link in a chain of conservation lands from central Florida to the Georgia state line. Sandhill after prescribed burn. Photo by Ben Williams. In 2012, the Williams’ began establishing longleaf pine on their property and reintroduced prescribed burning. Learn more...

    A gopher tortoise hiding in its shell. Photo by Ben Williams.

  • Fuzzy yellow and purple flowers emerging from a green grass-like stalk.

    Recovery progress for the American chaffseed

    June 27, 2017 | 2 minute readAmerican chaffseed is a perennial herb that has been listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act since 1992. As part of an ongoing recovery effort, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) recently introduced 70 seedlings in Dorchester County, South Carolina. The project included Service Partners for Fish and Wildlife biologist Joe Cockrell, Service botanist April Punsalan, and Jeff Glitzenstein, a research associate with Tall Timbers. The seedlings were planted in an open area of restored longleaf pine forest and near the edge of a restored freshwater depressional wetland on an Audubon chapter preserve. Learn more...

    American chaffseed © Robert Sincliar. Copyright release form S://EA/Photo Permissions/american-chaffseed.pdf

Caribbean

  • Puerto Rican mountains covered in vegetation.

    Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program

    The Caribbean Ecological Services Field Office promotes healthy wildlife and their habitat through a diverse group of programs: Endangered Species, Partners for Fish and Wildlife, Contaminants Program, Coastal Program and Project Evaluation. Learn more...

    Yauco, Puerto Rico. Photo by Jennifer Valentín, USFWS.

Lafayette

  • A gentleman kneels down in an agricultural field.

    For private landowners

    Partners for Fish and Wildlife program A large percentage of the land in Louisiana is privately owned. Without conservation efforts on private lands, our trust resources would simply not survive. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s (Service) Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program supports landowners who may lack the technical and financial support necessary to manage their land for wildlife. Partners for Fish and Wildlife is the primary mechanism for delivering voluntary habitat improvement projects on private lands for the benefit of federal trust species (such as migratory birds or migratory fish), endangered or threatened species, or any other at-risk species. Learn more...

    James Bradshaw, owner of Bradshaw Tree Inc. of Mississippi, planted the trees on Upper Ouachita NWR in northern Louisiana. Photo by Sean Gardner.

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