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Tag: Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program

The content below has been tagged with the term “Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program.”

Articles

  • Bright yellow flowers, not unlike a dandilion, extend from a chunky central stem
    Information icon St. Croix agave. Photo by Caroline Pott, East End Marine Park.

    Saving rare plants in the U.S. Virgin Islands

    August 14, 2019 | 3 minute read

    Like many other islands in the Caribbean, the history of St. Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands is inextricably bound up with the planting and harvesting of sugarcane. Decades of land clearing for sugar, as well as cotton and livestock, denuded the U.S. Virgin Islands of more than 90 percent of their native vegetation. Tropical lily-thorn. Photo by James Yrigoyen, USFWS. St. Croix agave (also called Egger’s century plant) and tropical lily-thorn are but two of the many plants that once flourished in the subtropical dry forests of St.  Learn more...

  • A bird with white breast and blue feathers on its back and wings perched on a wooden pallet
    Information icon Florida scrub jay. Photo by Joseph Sage, FWC.

    Partners for Fish and Wildlife plan helps both cattle rancher and Florida scrub jay

    July 17, 2019 | 2 minute read

    Palmer Simmons has been cattle ranching near Sebring, Florida, since 1990. His property, almost 1,000 acres, consists of scrub and sandhill habitats that contain many rare native species, most notably the Florida scrub jay, listed as threatened in 1987 under the Endangered Species Act. This unique ecosystem is a relic of ancient sand islands, and it now is home to one of the highest concentrations of imperiled species in the United States, including 29 classified as endangered or threatened.  Learn more...

  • A large backhoe hammers away at a dam from a rocky bank.
    Information icon Deconstruction begins using an 8000 lb. hydraulic breaker mounted on an excavator. Photo by Eric Spadgenske, USFWS.

    Partnerships run deep

    July 12, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Removing a nearly 100-year-old, 100-foot-long concrete and steel structure from the main channel of one of Alabama’s major river basins is no small undertaking. For any single agency, it would be nearly impossible. The solution may sound cliché, but in Alabama partnerships carry the day. Howle and Turner Dam. Photo by Eric Spadgenske, USFWS. Four years, four months, and 15 days – that is how long it took from fledgling thought to completion.  Learn more...

  • Reclaiming a dump

    June 27, 2019 | 3 minute read

    Since Fiscal Year 2018, the West Georgia Field Office of the Partners for Fish and Wildlife (PFW) Program has participated in a regional cooperative agreement in partnership with American Forestry Foundation (AFF) to provide cost share for work on private lands in southern Alabama and west-central Georgia. The goal of this partnership is to improve habitat and provide technical assistance for at-risk species on private lands; this work can help track conservation actions, inform listing determinations and provide regulatory predictability to landowners.  Learn more...

  • A small, colorful fish with yellow body and bright blue and orange fins
    Information icon Yazoo darter. Photo by Matt Wagner, MDWFP.

    Yazoo darter habitat conservation on working lands in Mississippi

    May 31, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Water Valley, Mississippi – The Reid farm, approximately 400 acres in size, is a typical family owned row crop operation in northeast Mississippi. The farm is located just off Highway 315 a few miles away from the picturesque town of Water Valley. The primary crops produced here are soybeans, corn, and potatoes. The countryside mostly consists of rolling hills of loblolly pine and hardwood drainages with cattle pastures and row crop agricultural fields widely interspersed.  Learn more...

  • Ten plus monarch butterflies perched on a single yellow plant.
    Information icon Monarch butterflies gathering in Chenier Plain coastal prairie. Photo by Woody Woodrow, USFWS.

    Monarchs on the ranch

    April 18, 2019 | 3 minute read

    Perryville, Arkansas — Diamond TR Ranch is a 340-acre working ranch located on Arkansas Highway 10 west of Little Rock. The ranch is divided by the Maumelle River which provides 95 percent of the input for Lake Maumelle, a source of drinking water for about 450,000 residents of central Arkansas. When I first pulled up to the ranch I was greeted by a man who had clearly been up since before sunrise.  Learn more...

  • water topels over a foot drop after a dam was removed on the Sucarnoochee River.
    Information icon Native fishes and mussels can move upstream after removal of Livingston Dam in Alabama. Photo by Eric Spadgenske, USFWS.

    Livingston Dam: A restoration story

    April 10, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Livingston, Alabama — The Sucarnoochee River is a sleepy coastal plain river that snakes its way through the Black Belt (the band of fertile soil crossing central Alabama and northeast Mississippi), near the University of West Alabama. The ‘nooch has only been studied by a handful of scientists and is not well known as a major tourist destination. Home to unique animals with comparably unique names, like bankclimber, fawnsfoot, Alabama orb, bluehead chub, and naked sand darter, this river contributes to the state of Alabama’s depth of aquatic biodiversity.  Learn more...

Caribbean

  • Puerto Rican mountains covered in vegetation.
    Information icon Yauco, Puerto Rico. Photo by Jennifer Valentín, USFWS.

    Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program

    The Caribbean Ecological Services Field Office promotes healthy wildlife and their habitat through a diverse group of programs: Endangered Species, Partners for Fish and Wildlife, Contaminants Program, Coastal Program and Project Evaluation.  Learn more...

Lafayette

  • A gentleman kneels down in an agricultural field.
    James Bradshaw, owner of Bradshaw Tree Inc. of Mississippi, planted the trees on Upper Ouachita NWR in northern Louisiana. Photo by Sean Gardner.

    For private landowners

    Partners for Fish and Wildlife program A large percentage of the land in Louisiana is privately owned. Without conservation efforts on private lands, our trust resources would simply not survive. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s (Service) Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program supports landowners who may lack the technical and financial support necessary to manage their land for wildlife. Partners for Fish and Wildlife is the primary mechanism for delivering voluntary habitat improvement projects on private lands for the benefit of federal trust species (such as migratory birds or migratory fish), endangered or threatened species, or any other at-risk species.  Learn more...

News

  • A close-up shot of a small fish with a black line along it’s side and a bright red tip on it’s dorsal fin.
    Information icon Ashy darter. Photo by Conservation Fisheries, Inc.

    Thanks to conservation partnerships, two southeastern fish and a snail do not warrant Endangered Species Act protection

    April 3, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Following extensive scientific reviews, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that three southeastern animals do not face the threat of extinction now or in the foreseeable future. Accordingly, the ashy darter, Barrens darter and Arkansas mudalia snail do not warrant Endangered Species Act (ESA) protection. For each animal, the Service brought together a team of biologists who compiled and examined all known data and research. Their peer-reviewed findings are outlined in species status assessments (SSAs), made available today.  Read the full story...

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