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Tag: Panama City Ecological Services Field Office

The content below has been tagged with the term “Panama City Ecological Services Field Office.”

Articles

  • A brown sign bent in half by high winds that reads St Vincent NWR
    Information icon The sand-clogged dock with St. Vincent NWR in the background. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    Survivors of the storm

    October 22, 2018 | 6 minute read

    Bradley Smith seeks evidence that the red wolves survived Hurricane Michael off St. Vincent NWR. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS. Apalachicola, Florida — Bradley Smith stood tall on the bow of the SeaArk 21-footer with a VHF antenna held high. It was quiet, too quiet. It had been six days since Hurricane Michael devastated the Panhandle and Smith was listening for signs of life on St.  Learn more...

  • A street sign that reads “Shade St” on a street denuded of all vegetation
    Information icon A street whose name no longer applies now that it’s nearly treeless. Service crews worked Thursday to remove fallen oaks from the yards of people on Shade Street in Panama City. Photo by Mark Davis, USFWS.

    “The first people we’ve seen here since the hurricane”

    October 19, 2018 | 8 minute read

    Panama City, Florida — They didn’t have much time. Rose and Perry Lane fled just hours before Hurricane Michael bowled into Panama City. They took Mary Lane, 92, Perry’s mother. Simbo the cat sat in a carrier on her lap. The Lanes headed inland to an emergency shelter at a school where safety waited. Or so they thought. The fast-moving hurricane, trimming Panhandle pine forests like an immense lawn mower, got to the school not far behind the Lanes.  Learn more...

  • A drum-shapped buoy washed ashore with plam trees and a lighthouse in the distance
    Information icon A buoy washed ashore by Hurricane Michael at St. Marks NWR.

    Service makes headway in Hurricane Michael repairs

    October 17, 2018 | 5 minute read

    St. Marks, Florida — The images of Hurricane Michael’s rampage across the Panhandle have been seared, by now, into the nation’s collective consciousness: the roofless homes; the mountains of debris; the long lines of anguished people; and the miles of chopped-in-half trees. The worst of the damage came courtesy of winds nearing 155 mph. Michael’s counter-clockwise punch, though, pushed water from the Gulf of Mexico deep inland, swamping small towns, barrier islands and wildlife refuges, particularly along Michael’s eastern edge.  Learn more...

  • A fallen street sign blown over by high winds reads Mercedes Ave.
    Information icon Hurricane Michael bent the sign for Mercedes Ave. in half. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    The Battle for Mercedes Avenue

    October 14, 2018 | 6 minute read

    Panama City, Florida — The battle for Mercedes Avenue was joined. On one side stood an army of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service sawyers, swampers and heavy-equipment operators. On the other, a seemingly impenetrable forest of hurricane-downed pines and oaks blocking the street and keeping locals, utilities and ambulances from getting through. The Service’s sawyers readying to attack a tree. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS. Hurricane Michael had ripped across the Panhandle destroying houses, businesses and this city’s once-lovely tree canopy with equally reckless abandon.  Learn more...

  • A bowling alley with one wall and part of the roof blown off.
    Information icon A bowling alley on US 98 in the wake of Hurricane Michael. Photo by Dan Chapman.

    Service task forces start assisting in Hurricane Michael recovery

    October 13, 2018 | 5 minute read

    Panama City, Florida – The sawyers and engineers, swampers and commanders arrived in the dark Thursday unable to fully grasp what Hurricane Michael had wrought. But there was no mistaking the devastation when the two-dozen U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service workers woke Friday in this Panhandle town no longer recognizable. Virtually every tree for miles was down or damaged. Roofs disappeared from homes and businesses along U.S. 98 only to be found a block away.  Learn more...

  • Summer youth employment at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

    June 26, 2018 | 1 minute read

    YCC students Hope Barras and Joshua Cumbie assisting Camp Helen State Park in Panama City, FL with maintenance. Photo by USFWS. The Panama City Field Office welcomes two local teenagers, Hope Barras and Joshua Cumbie, who will take part in the 2018 Youth Conservation Corps (YCC). This is a federally funded youth employment program facilitated by the Department of Interior. Hope and Joshua both attend Mosley High School and are leaders in the Marine Corps Junior ROTC program.  Learn more...

  • A shining example

    June 4, 2018 | 7 minute read

    Atlanta, Georgia — Sam Shine, for years, quietly bought up North Florida property and set about conserving it. A successful Midwestern manufacturer, Shine made a number of under-the-radar land deals that received little notice outside the Panhandle conservation community. Until now. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service just received 6,200 acres of ecologically critical pine lands and headwaters adjoining the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. Shine is donating the land to the Service — a gift — not merely selling of a chunk at a good price or establishing a conservation easement.  Learn more...

  • A deep black snake coiled up on sandy soil with young longleaf pine seedlings in the background
    Information icon An Eastern indigo snake on sandy soil associated with the longleaf pine ecosystem. Photo © Houston Chandler, the Orianne Society (Used with permission).

    Snakes in a bag

    May 25, 2018 | 8 minute read

    Andalusia, Alabama — A gaggle of biologists, zookeepers, college students and government officials traipsed through the Deep South longleaf pine forest one recent, gorgeous spring morning carefully clutching white pillowcases. They were looking for holes. More specifically, gopher tortoise burrows into which they could deposit their precious cargo of Eastern indigo snakes, aka “Emperors of the Forest.” Southern Alabama including Conecuh National Forest. Map by Roy Hewitt, USFWS.  Learn more...

News

  • A small woodpecker perched on a pine tree.
    Information icon In 2018, there were 38 active clusters of endangered red-cockaded woodpeckers on this property in Alabama, thriving there under a Safe Harbor Agreement. Composite photo by Mark Bailey.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of 42 southeastern species

    August 3, 2018 | 7 minute read

    The red-cockaded woodpecker is one of 42 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife and plants that will get updated five-year status reviews conducted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in the months ahead. They are all found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before October 5, 2018. These five-year reviews, required by the Endangered Species Act (ESA) will ensure listing classifications under the ESA are accurate and recommend changes in status where appropriate based on the latest science and analysis.  Read the full story...

  • A low growing shrub with bright purple flowers.
    Information icon Endangered Pyne’s ground-plum. Photo by NPS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of 35 Southeastern species

    May 7, 2018 | 5 minute read

    As part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of 35 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife, and plants. These species are found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before July 6, 2018. These five-year reviews will ensure listing classifications under the ESA are accurate and recommend changes in status where appropriate based on the latest science and analysis.  Read the full story...

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