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Tag: Panama City Ecological Services Field Office

The content below has been tagged with the term “Panama City Ecological Services Field Office.”

Articles

  • A grey and black reticulated salamander walking through the grass
    Information icon Endangered reticulated flatwoods salamander. Photo by Virginia Tech.

    Breakthrough for recovering endangered Florida salamanders encourages scientists

    May 7, 2020 | 3 minute read

    A little good news in these crazy coronavirus times: the very small and federally endangered reticulated flatwoods salamander recently notched a much-needed victory in its long struggle to avoid extinction. Ecologist Harold Mitchell explains: “We translocated salamander larvae to another pond where they successfully turned into metamorphs. This shows that the animals can live if they’re moved from one location to another. That’s never been done before with this species.  Learn more...

  • Tall, yellow cylindrical plants growing on wet ground
    Information icon Trumpet pitcher plants. Photo © Atlanta Botanical Garden, used with permission.

    Seeps and springs and pitcher plants

    June 17, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Long ago, before Florida’s Panhandle was ditched, drained, paved and primed for development, there existed a rich tapestry of bogs, dunes, lakes and forests alongside the Gulf of Mexico. Bulldozers all but wiped out the rare coastal habitat. Pockets, though, remain. Pockets of pitcher plants and pine lilies; of seepage slopes and wet prairies; of wiregrass and sedges; and of butterflies and bees. Pine lily. Photo © Atlanta Botanical Garden, used with permission.  Learn more...

  • A pine forest with trees snapped in half by high winds and a bent speed limit sign
    Information icon Tyndall Air Force Base pine forests were scissored by Hurricane Michael. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    Opportunity from disaster

    June 7, 2019 | 7 minute read

    Panama City, Florida — Hurricane Michael savaged Tyndall Air Force Base with 160 mph winds that nearly destroyed the base and everything, including the trees, within its deadly path across the Panhandle. Damage to Tyndall alone topped $3 billion. Three-fourths of the pines on the 29,000-acre base between the Gulf of Mexico and East Bay were sheared in half. Tyndall lost $14 million in harvestable timber. Blackhawk helicopters fly over Tyndall Air Force Base.  Learn more...

  • A bright pink bird with large wings with black feathers flying across a blue sky
    Information icon Pinky The Flamingo turned up at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge in Florida after Hurricane Michael. Photo © Karen Willes, Friends of St. Marks Wildlife Refuge.

    Pinky in paradise

    May 2, 2019 | 4 minute read

    St. Marks, Florida — Hurricane Michael careened through the Gulf of Mexico last fall sucking up all manner of flotsam and jetsam before scattering the unwelcome mess across the Panhandle. Yet there was one airborne interloper that was embraced heartily by the storm-tossed masses below. Pinky The Flamingo.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A brown mussel in a sandy river bottom
    Information icon Suwannee moccasinshell in its natural habitat. Photo by FWC.

    Suwannee moccasinshell Critical Habitat

    November 26, 2019 | 9 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is proposing to designate critical habitat for the Suwannee moccasinshell under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). What is the range of the Suwannee moccasinshell? The Suwannee moccasinshell, a small freshwater mussel, was historically present throughout much of the Suwannee River Basin; including the Suwannee River main stem in Florida, Santa River sub-basin in Florida, and the Withlacoochee River in Florida and Georgia.  Learn more...

News

  • A brown mussel in a sandy river bottom
    Information icon Suwannee moccasinshell in its natural habitat. Photo by FWC.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes critical habitat for freshwater mussel in Georgia and Florida

    November 26, 2019 | 4 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today proposed critical habitat for the Suwannee moccasinshell, a freshwater mussel protected as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) since 2016. The Service is also making available a draft economic analysis that assesses the potential impact of the Suwannee moccasinshell’s critical habitat designation on various sectors of the economy. Members of the public are invited to comment on the proposal to help inform future conservation of this aquatic species and its habitat in southwest Georgia and northwest Florida.  Read the full story...

  • A black, grey and yellow snake with a rounded head.
    Information icon Southern hognose snake. Photo by Pierson Hill, FWC.

    Service determines six Southeastern species do not warrant Endangered Species Act protections

    October 7, 2019 | 6 minute read

    Based on reviews of the best available science, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has found that the Florida clamshell orchid, Ocala vetch, yellow anisetree, redlips darter, Berry Cave salamander and southern hognose snake do not face the threat of extinction now or in the foreseeable future. Protection of these species on existing conservation lands and new survey data helped inform the reviews, and as such, the Service determined that none of the species warrant protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).  Read the full story...

  • A light brown snake with darker black and brown markings on a green vine.
    Puerto Rican boa. Photo by Jan Paul Zegarra.

    Service announces recovery plan revisions for 43 species, to assist in measuring progress and addressing threats

    August 5, 2019 | 5 minute read

    As part of an agency-wide effort to advance the recovery of our nation’s most imperiled species, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has made publicly available draft revisions for 21 recovery plans that provide a recovery roadmap for 43 federally protected species. This batch of recovery plan revisions is part of the Department of the Interior’s Agency Priority Performance Goals. The effort calls for all recovery plans to include quantitative criteria on what constitutes recovery by September 2019.  Read the full story...

  • A green plant with serrated edges and a brown stem with a cylindrical orange flower.
    Information icon *Gesneria pauciflora* (no common name). Photo by Jan Paul Zegarra, USFWS.

    Service announces recovery plan revisions for 53 species, to assist in measuring progress and addressing threats

    August 5, 2019 | 5 minute read

    As part of an agency-wide effort to advance the recovery of our nation’s most imperiled species, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has made publicly available draft revisions for 28 Endangered Species Act (ESA) recovery plans that provide a recovery roadmap for 53 federally protected species. This batch of recovery plan revisions is part of the Department of the Interior’s Agency Priority Performance Goals, which call for all recovery plans to include quantitative criteria on what constitutes recovery, by September 2019.  Read the full story...

  • A man in a green shirt kneels down into tall grass to release a long black snake.
    Information icon David Printiss of TNC releases an eastern indigo snake into a gopher tortoise burrow during a 2018 release. Photo by Tim Donovan, FWC.

    Good news for America’s longest snake! 15 eastern indigo snakes just released in year three of the North Florida recovery effort

    June 11, 2019 | 8 minute read

    Tallahassee, Florida — Fifteen eastern indigo snakes, listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, have just been released in northern Florida as part of a continuing collaborative plan to return the important, native, non-venomous apex predator to the region. This effort marks the third year in a row that snakes raised specifically for recovery of the species have been released at The Nature Conservancy’s Apalachicola Bluffs and Ravines Preserve (ABRP) in Bristol.  Read the full story...

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