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Tag: Panama City Crayfish

The content below has been tagged with the term “Panama City Crayfish.”

Articles

  • A beach in a cove lined with green grass and tall pine trees
    Information icon Shoreline at future Lynn Haven park site. Photo by USFWS.

    New public park will protect Panama City crayfish

    February 18, 2020 | 3 minute read

    Lynn Haven, Florida — A new public park located along the shore of North Bay and McKitchen’s Bayou in Lynn Haven will not only provide public access to waterways and recreational facilities, but will also protect rapidly disappearing habitat for the Panama City crayfish, a species the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently proposed for federal listing. The park will be bought and maintained using funds from the Deepwater Horizon National Resource Damage Assessment settlement.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A hand holding a small lobster shaped crayfish.
    Information icon Panama City crayfish. Photo by USFWS.

    Proposed listing of Panama City crayfish as threatened under Endangered Species Act, with proposed 4(d) rule and critical habitat

    April 14, 2021 | 11 minute read

    Why is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposing to list the Panama City crayfish as threatened under the Endangered Species Act? A review of the best available science has determined that the Panama City crayfish meets the definition of threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The science indicates the Panama City crayfish is likely to become an endangered species within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range.  Learn more...

  • A hand holding a small lobster shaped crayfish.
    Panama City crayfish. Photo by USFWS.

    Panama City Crayfish Proposed Listing Under the Endangered Species Act

    January 3, 2018 | 3 minute read

    What is the Panama City crayfish? The Panama City crayfish is a small, semi-terrestrial crayfish that grows to about two inches in length, minus claws, and is found only in Bay County, Florida. The life history of the Panama City crayfish is not well known. However, many crayfish species have a maximum lifespan of 1.5 to 3.5 years. Why is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposing to list the Panama City crayfish as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA)?  Learn more...

News

  • A hand holding a small lobster shaped crayfish.
    Information icon Panama City crayfish. Photo by USFWS.

    Service reopens public comment period on proposal to list Panama City crayfish under Endangered Species Act

    April 14, 2021 | 5 minute read

    Panama City, Fla. – The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is reopening the public comment period on its 2018 proposal to list the Panama City crayfish as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The Service is also proposing to designate a critical habitat for the crayfish, and a special 4(d) rule, designed to conserve the crayfish while allowing greater flexibility for landowners. A draft economic analysis of the proposed critical habitat designation is also being released with today’s proposed rule.  Read the full story...

  • A hand holding a brownish red crayfish near a cameras lens with a stream in the background.
    Information icon Panama City crayfish. Photo by FWC.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes listing Panama City crayfish as federally threatened

    January 3, 2018 | 4 minute read

    Panama City, Florida – Based on the best available science, the Service has found that the Panama City crayfish – a two-inch-long crustacean found only in the open pine flatwoods and wet prairie marshes of Bay County, Florida – meets the definition of “threatened” under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and is proposing it for listing. The Service is opening a 60-day public comment period on the proposal. Under the ESA, a threatened species is one that is likely to become extinct within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range.  Read the full story...

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