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Tag: Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge

The content below has been tagged with the term “Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge.”

Articles

  • Entrance sign notifies visitors the refuge is closed due to a fire.
    Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge is closed as crews battle the West Mims fire. Photo by Mark Davis, USFWS.

    Keeping upbeat

    May 2, 2017 | 2 minute read

    Folkston, Georgia – If he needs a reminder of how to run a wildlife refuge – especially one that’s on fire – all Michael Lusk needs to do is look at the skull in his office. That’s an alligator skull, and it came from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s (Service) Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge. At one time, it was attached to a beast about 9 feet long. Propped in its gaping mouth is a narrow sign with a message:  Learn more...

  • A man wearing a hard hat and protective gear yeilds an axe.
    Information icon Martin Ramos of Vieques National Wildlife Refuge in Puerto Rico lends a hand at the West Mims fire. Photo by Mark Davis, USFWS.

    Puerto Ricans bring fight to fire

    May 2, 2017 | 3 minute read

    Folkston, Georgia – Martin Ramos will always remember that call: “Report to the Okefenokee”. That was six years ago, when a fire rose to life in the middle of the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge and steadily grew. By the time the 2011 Honey Prairie fire had been extinguished, it had burned more than 300,000 acres. It also sparked an interest in Ramos, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) fire officer assigned to the Service’s Vieques NWR in Puerto Rico.  Learn more...

  • Four firefighers pose for a photo in front of a Fish and Wildlife Helicopter with mountains in the background
    The U. S. Fish & Wildlife helicopter and firefighters during the North Fork and Little Queens Fires, Sawtooth National Forest near Atlanta, Idaho. L to R – Reggie Forcine (Okefenokee), Cory Bryant (Okefenokee), Ryan Roche (Lake Wales Ridge, Florida), Paul Ryan, (J.N. “Ding” Darling, Florida).

    Okefenokee firefighters return the favor to western firefighters

    November 6, 2013 | 6 minute read

    After receiving help from firefighters across America to manage fires in 2007 and 2011-2012, firefighters at Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge return the favor by heading west to assist with fires in Idaho, Oregon, California and Washington.  Learn more...

Podcasts

  • Sunset over waterbody.
    Information icon Night falls at Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Joy Campbell of Okefenokee Adventures.

    Toe River Valley River Trail

    November 30, 2008 | 3 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Today we’ll examine an effort to increase accessibility to one of the most beautiful corners of the Southern Appalachians. In Okefenokee Swamp National Wildlife refuge, there is little hiking, simply because there is little dry earth, however, visitors routinely traverse the refuge, camping in it’s backcountry and enjoying the alligators, turtles, and birds this southeast Georgia wilderness offers. Instead of being laced with hiking trails, the area is laced with paddling trails, with backcountry visitors paddling through the swamp from wooden camping platform to wooden camping platform.  Learn more...

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