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Tag: Ohio

The content below has been tagged with the term “Ohio.”

Faq

  • A small black bird flies over a lush green marsh

    Proposed listing for the eastern black rail

    October 5, 2018 | 12 minute readWhat action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is proposing to protect the eastern black rail, a small secretive marsh bird native to the United States, as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Partially migratory, the eastern black rail is known in as many as 36 states, plus multiple territories and countries in the Caribbean and Central and South America. It is one of four subspecies of black rail, which live in salt, brackish, and freshwater marshes. Learn more...

    Eastern black rail in flight – Texas, April 2016. Photo © Jesse Huth, used with permission, Huth Avian Services.

News

  • A small, blue and yellow fish floating above rocky substrate

    Tiny freshwater fish does not warrant federal protection

    December 18, 2018 | 3 minute readAfter a thorough scientific review, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that populations of the Tippecanoe darter, a small freshwater fish, do not warrant federal protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). In some places, surveys suggest increasing populations, likely due to improvements in water quality. One of the smallest darters in the world, the Tippecanoe darter continues to be found across its historical range in larger streams and rivers of the Ohio River watershed in Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and West Virginia. Read the full story...

    Tippecanoe darter. Photo © Robert Criswell, used with permission.

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.

    Service proposes to list the eastern black rail as threatened under the Endangered Species Act

    October 5, 2018 | 5 minute readThe U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and its partners are working to protect a small, secretive marsh bird that is in steep decline. Some populations of the eastern black rail along the Atlantic coast have dropped by as much as 90 percent, and with a relatively small total population remaining across the eastern United States, the Service is proposing to list the subspecies as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Read the full story...

    Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

  • A grey bird with a brown head flying across a bright blue sky.

    Ohio Youth wins the federal junior duck stamp competition

    April 20, 2012 | 3 minute readThe U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced today a northern pintail was selected to appear on the 2012-2013 Federal Junior Duck Stamp. The design for the new stamp, painted by Christine Clayton, was chosen by a panel of judges at the national Junior Duck Stamp Art Contest, held at the Patuxent Research Refuge in Laurel, Md. “I congratulate our winning artist and all of the talented young people who participate in the Junior Duck Stamp Conservation and Design Program each year,” said Dan Ashe, Director of the U. Read the full story...

    A northern pintail by Christine Clayton of Ohio will be displayed on the 2012 Federal Junior Duck Stamp.

Podcasts

  • A fuzzy bat bearing its teeth with white fungus covering its face.

    Southern Appalachians face white nose syndrome

    July 10, 2009 | 2 minute readTranscript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. White nose syndrome, an affliction of unknown origin that is fatal to bats, has been confirmed in two Virginia counties, the first cases in the Southern Appalachians. First documented in New York in 2006, WNS has killed tens of thousands of bats as it spread north and south. The affliction takes its name from the white-tufts of fungus that often grow on the muzzles of infected bats, however, it’s unknown if this fungus is the cause of the problem or merely taking advantage of a diseased and weakened bat. Learn more...

    Little brown bat from Avery County with White Nose Syndrome. Photo by Gabrielle Graeter, NCWRC.

Wildlife

  • A colorful green/brown and red trout covered in small red spots.

    Brook trout

    The brook trout is a fish native to the eastern United States, and is often referred to as speckled trout, spotted trout, brookie, and squaretail. “Brookies” are considered an indicator species, because they help indicate the health or overall quality of the waters they inhabit. Visit the species profile...

    A wildlife biologist holds a small eastern brook trout. Photo by Steve Droter, Chesapeake Bay Program.

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.

    Eastern black rail

    Black rails are the smallest rails in North America. One of four recognized subspecies of black rail, the eastern black rail is perhaps the most secretive. This small inhabitant of shallow salt and freshwater marshes is rarely seen and has a distinctive "kick-ee-doo" call that is often heard at night. Visit the species profile...

    Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

  • Three brownish yellow mussels the smallest of which has a small white protrusion which the mussel uses to attach to a rock.

    Fanshell

    The fanshell is a green and yellow, medium sized mussel found in various rivers in Alabama, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia. It is protected as an endangered species. Visit the species profile...

    Photo by Monte McGregor, Center Mollusk Conservation, Kentucky DFWR.

  • White flowers with many stamen burst from a shrub much like a hydrangea bush

    Virginia spiraea

    The Virginia spiraea is found in the Appalachian Plateaus or the southern Blue Ridge Mountains in Alabama, Ohio, West Virginia, Virginia, Tennessee, North Carolina, Kentucky, and Georgia. Visit the species profile...

    Virginia spiraea, Walker County, Georgia. Photo © Alan Cressler, used with permission.

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