skip to content

Tag: Ochlawaha Bog

The content below has been tagged with the term “Ochlawaha Bog.”

Podcasts

  • A brown bird with purple wing tips floats on semi-frozen water.
    Female wood duck at Eufaula National Wildlife Refuge. Photo © Quincey Banks.

    Birding at Ochlawaha bog

    March 7, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The dry, late-winter brush covering the field was several feet high as we walked across, side-by-side, looking for birds. Then, with startling suddenness, a bird shot out of the brush, flying for several yards before settling back down to earth. It was a woodcock, a gamebird, and for the knowing observer, her flush gave away the existence of her nest, hidden on the ground and holding a pair of eggs.  Learn more...

  • Green grass-like vegetation emerges from standing water.
    Bunched arrowhead. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Former farmland restored to rare habitat

    March 7, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. At first glance it appears to be merely a patch of woods and farm field beside an established Flat Rock neighborhood. However, to biologists it’s Ochlawaha bog, a degraded remnant of one of the rarest natural communities in North America, and it’s in the beginning stages of a resurgence. Biologists estimate around 500 acres of Southern Appalachian bogs remain, and their importance is heightened by the fact they’re often home to greatly imperiled species.  Learn more...

  • A grass-like plant with white flowers emerges from the marsh.
    The proposed expansion would allow a population of the endangered bunched arrowhead to be conserved as part of Mountain Bogs National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Ochlawaha bog - conserving one of our rarest habitats

    April 13, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature We all know endangered species are rare. But there’s rare and then there’s rare. Bunched arrowhead is an endangered plant found only in two counties. In the entire world. Henderson County, North Carolina, and Greenville County, South Carolina. It lives in Southern Appalachian bogs one of the rarest natural communities on the planet, with only about 500 acres remaining in North Carolina.  Learn more...

Contact Us:

Looking for a media contact? Reach out to a regional spokesperson.

Share this page

Tweet this page on Twitter or follow @USFWSsoutheast

Share this page on Facebook or follow USFWSsoutheast.

LinkedIn

Share this page on LinkedIn