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Tag: NWRS

The content below has been tagged with the term “NWRS.”

News

  • A group of manatees swims near the surface of clear blue water.
    Manatees swim close to the surface and frequently come up for air. Credit: Jim Reid, USFWS.

    Service offers refined alternative for access to Three Sisters Springs

    November 10, 2015 | 4 minute read

    A refined proposal to provide access to Three Sisters Springs at Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge is being released today and it includes three noteworthy changes from an August draft proposal released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. After reviewing more than 2,600 comments from citizens, local leaders and the business community, the Service released a revised draft Environmental Assessment for public comment that it believes better matches up its need to protect manatees with local tourism and business interests and its partnership with the City of Crystal River.  Read the full story...

  • Several manatee silhouettes from below with sun beams.
    Manatees at Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge, FL. Photo by David Hinkel, USFWS.

    Service to enact additional manatee protection measures at Three Sisters Springs

    February 26, 2015 | 4 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service published its Final Environmental Assessment “Manatee Wildlife Viewing on Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge, Three Sisters Springs, Citrus County, Florida.” “We appreciate the public’s support for our mission, and we carefully considered everyone’s comments,” said Andrew Gude, who manages Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge, as well as Lower Suwannee, Cedar Keys, and Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuges. “Thanks to that input, we hope we have reached the best way to protect manatees, and provide for positive experiences for people wanting to swim with these gentle giants.  Read the full story...

  • Banks of the Mississippi River.
    Mississippi River at Lower Hatchie Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Roland Klose CC BY-ND 2.0.

    Service tables proposal to expand the acquisition boundaries of Chickasaw and Lower Hatchie National Wildlife Refuges

    April 23, 2014 | 1 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has tabled planning efforts on its proposal to expand the acquisition boundaries of Chickasaw and Lower Hatchie National Wildlife Refuges in western Tennessee. The public meetings scheduled for April 29 and 30, in Ripley and Brownsville, TN, respectively, have been cancelled. “After careful consideration, we will not pursue a major boundary expansion at this time,” said David Viker, Southeast Regional Chief of the National Wildlife Refuge System.  Read the full story...

  • Members of the bumper family gather around the new entrance sign to the Refuge.
    L to R: USFWS Director Dan Ashe, Bill Bumpers, Heidi Bumpers, Brent Bumpers, and Senator Pryor at the Dale Bumpers White River National Wildlife Refuge renaming event, April 18, 2014. Credit: John Stark, USFWS.

    White River National Wildlife Refuge renamed in honor of Dale Bumpers

    April 18, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Senator Dale Bumpers. Public domain license. St. Charles, Arkansas – At a ceremony this afternoon, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will officially rename the White River National Wildlife Refuge to the Dale Bumpers White River National Wildlife Refugee in a ceremony honoring the former Arkansas Governor and four-term U.S. Senator. Congress voted to rename the refuge after Bumpers in January of this year.  Read the full story...

  • Two large, white, Whooping cranes flying in for a landing on a small pond.
    Two juvenile Whooping cranes released from their holding pen fly around on Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge, Decatur, AL. Photo by Bill Gates, USFWS.

    Ultralight-led whooping cranes released at Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge

    February 10, 2012 | 3 minute read

    The nine whooping cranes led by ultralight aircraft have been released from a holding pen at Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge after Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership biologists attached marking bands and transmitters to help track their movements. “So far the cranes are foraging and hanging around close to the pen and moving into the flooded fields,” said Bill Gates, Biologist at Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge, near Decatur and Huntsville, Ala. “We plan to leave the gate to the pen open, so if they need to come back here they can.  Read the full story...

  • A grassy low-lying area under a bright blue sky.
    Everglades Headwater Proposed National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by USFWS.

    Public scoping comment deadline extended to March 31, 2011 for the proposed Everglades Headwaters National Wildlife Refuge and Conservation Area

    February 17, 2011 | 2 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will now accept public scoping comments through March 31, 2011, on the proposal to create a refuge and conservation area in south-central Florida. The period was extended by one month to give interested individuals and organizations more time to get involved. “We want to make sure anyone interested has the opportunity to participate in this planning process and contribute their ideas, concerns, and comments,” said Charlie Pelizza, the Service’s lead for the proposal and the Refuge Manager for Pelican Island,Archie Carr, and Lake Wales Ridge National Wildlife Refuges in Florida.  Read the full story...

  • Two large, white, Whooping cranes flying in for a landing on a small pond.
    Two juvenile Whooping cranes released from their holding pen fly around on Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge, Decatur, AL. Photo by Bill Gates, USFWS.

    Young whooping cranes will learn migration route from their elders

    October 26, 2009 | 5 minute read

    Nine young whooping cranes were released October 24 on central Wisconsin’s Necedah National Wildlife Refuge. The cranes are part of the Direct Autumn Release (DAR) project conducted by the Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership (WCEP), an international coalition of public and private groups that is reintroducing this highly imperiled species in eastern North America, part of its historical range. There are approximately 77 whooping cranes in the wild in eastern North America thanks to WCEP’s efforts.  Read the full story...

  • A forest of felled trees some snapped in half after a tornado.
    Information icon Tornado damage on the refuge. Photo by USFWS.

    Tornado strikes White River National Wildlife Refuge

    August 7, 2009 | 2 minute read

    A tornado twisted through White River National Wildlife Refuge in St. Charles, Arkansas, on July 30, 2009, leaving an eight-mile path of destruction. The tornado felled bottomland hardwood trees on about 1,750 acres as it traveled through the refuge’s Jacks Bay area northeast through Big Island. Although no one was injured during the tornado, afterward several refuge visitors waited in their vehicles until refuge, Arkansas County, and Tichnor Volunteer Fire Department personnel could clear debris from a one-half-mile path on an exit road.  Read the full story...

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