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Tag: Northern Long-Eared Bat

The content below has been tagged with the term “Northern Long-Eared Bat.”

Articles

  • Purple/grey and bright orange flowers bloom in a grassy field.
    Information icon Two species of milkweed, common and butterfly, grow wild in the barrens. Milkweed is a favorite plant of monarch butterflies. Photo by J. Brent Harrel, USFWS.

    Partners join to conserve rare prairie barrens in Kentucky

    August 31, 2017 | 3 minute read

    Monarch butterflies descend on the fields in droves, drawn by the abundance of milkweed, their favorite pollinator plant. Endangered northern long-eared and Indiana bats swoop through the sky. On the ground, biodiversity abounds, with rare plants like scurf pea and false gromwell. This little Eden - 160 acres now owned by the non-profit Southern Conservation Corps (SCC) – is a combination of forest and extremely rare prairie barrens habitat in Garrard County, a mostly rural county in central Kentucky.  Learn more...

  • A forrested stream with rocky shores.
    Information icon Raccoon Creek. Photo by Brett Albanese, Georgia DNR.

    A wildlife gem, in the shadow of a booming Atlanta

    June 7, 2017 | 8 minute read

    Braswell, Georgia — It was 1946, a cold night in the Blue Ridge mountains, and the six frustrated deer hunters hunkered down in a glade as the wind howled. Two days spent scrambling over the hills had flushed but one doe. The annual hunt was no longer worth the long drive from Paulding County outside Atlanta. “What I’m figuring,” said E.F. Corley, a farmer, sawmiller, truck driver and ordained Baptist minister, “is stocking deer in the hills behind home.  Learn more...

News

  • Two biologists meticulously swab a small bat lit by head lamp
    Biologists collecting a swab sample of bat skin. Photo by Rose Railey, USFWS.

    Searching for the northern long-eared bat in unexpected places

    March 30, 2016 | 2 minute read

    In early March, a group of biologists captured four Northern Long-Eared Bat (NLEB) on two separate surveys at the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge in Dare County, NC and the Roanoke River National Wildlife Refuge in Bertie County, NC. A total of 40 bats from six different species were captured during the two outings. The crew examined and tested the bats for the fungus that causes White Nose Syndrome (WNS) and then released them unharmed.  Read the full story...

  • A small furry bat in a crevice of a cave with patches of white fungus on its face and shoulder.
    A northern-long-eared bat with suspected White Nose Syndrome. Photo by Steve Taylor, University of Illinois.

    Service proposes special rule to focus protections for northern long-eared bat

    January 15, 2015 | 6 minute read

    In response to the rapid and severe decline of the northern long-eared bat – a species important for crop pest control – the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing a special rule under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) that would provide the maximum benefit to the species while limiting the regulatory burden on the public. If finalized, the rule, under section 4(d) of the ESA, would apply only in the event the Service lists the bat as “threatened.  Read the full story...

  • A small furry bat in a crevice of a cave with patches of white fungus on its face and shoulder.
    A northern-long-eared bat with suspected White Nose Syndrome. Photo by Steve Taylor, University of Illinois.

    Service reopens comment period on proposal to list the northern long-eared bat as endangered

    November 18, 2014 | 2 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is reopening the public comment period on a proposal to list the northern long-eared bat as endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Comments will be accepted through Dec. 18, 2014. The Service is reopening the comment period to alert the public to additional information provided by state conservation agencies within the range of the species. The Service will consider this information, and all information received previously, while determining whether the northern long-eared bat warrants listing under the Endangered Species Act.  Read the full story...

Podcasts

  • A small, brown, furry bat in a gloved hand.
    Information icon Northern long-eared bat caught at Roanoke River National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by USFWS.

    Northern long-eared bat on endangered species list

    May 18, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. On May fourth, the northern long-eared bat was added to the federal endangered species list as a threatened animal. What makes this listing especially notable, is it’s the first related to the fungal disease white-nose syndrome, which has killed millions of bats in eastern and central North America. In the United States, the northern long-eared bat is found from Maine to North Carolina on the Atlantic Coast, westward to Oklahoma and north through the Dakotas, reaching into eastern Montana and Wyoming.  Learn more...

  • A small furry bat in a crevice of a cave with patches of white fungus on its face and shoulder.
    Information icon A northern-long-eared bat with suspected White Nose Syndrome. Photo by Steve Taylor, University of Illinois.

    Bats step closer to endangered species list

    August 1, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. White-nose syndrome is a deadly bat disease that has killed more than a million bats in the Eastern United States. Many have asked what this means for the long-term survival of entire species of bats, and we may be beginning to get an idea. The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service maintains the federal list of threatened and endangered species. Under the Endangered Species Act, anyone can ask the Service to add a plant or animal to that list, and based on the information they provide and information the Service already has, wildlife biologists may decide to investigate further, possibly deciding to add the species to the list.  Learn more...

  • A river runs through a valley in fall.
    Information icon Eastern small-footed bat. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    New bats for endangered species list?

    April 18, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The spread of white-nose syndrome, the deadly bat disease, brings with it many questions, one of the most important, what will become of our bat populations? Parts of the eastern United States have already seen dramatic die-offs in bat numbers. In response to white-nose syndrome, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, which maintains the U.S. list of endangered species, has been asked to add two more bat species to that list.  Learn more...

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