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Tag: North Carolina

The content below has been tagged with the term “North Carolina.”

Articles

  • A green toad with dark spots in a biologist’s gloved hand
    Information icon Biologists at the Saratoga National Fish Hatchery in Wyoming hopped at the chance to raise the endangered Wyoming toad. Photo by USFWS.

    They’re growing what?

    November 5, 2019 | 9 minute read

    In Virginia and South Carolina hatcheries, biologists keep a close eye on shad and striped bass while taking time to focus on something that will never wear scales: mussels. And down in Florida, hatchery scientists charged with making sure rivers and streams are stocked with catfish and bass are singing the praises of a tiny bird they’re raising outside their labs. The Tishomingo National Fish Hatchery is growing alligator snapping turtles to boost that species’ population.  Learn more...

  • Two dozen or more conservationists gather for a discussion at high altitude on a cold, foggy morning.
    Information icon Service biologist, Sue Cameron, gives instructions on planting red spruce. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Mapping the sky islands

    October 9, 2019 | 7 minute read

    Asheville, North Carolina — On November 24, 1983, a Cessna 414A left Chicago en route to Sylva, North Carolina, a small town just south of the Blue Ridge Parkway. The plane’s last radar contact showed an altitude of 6,100 feet. About a mile later, at an altitude of about 6,000 feet, it crashed into the ridge between Waterrock Knob and Mount Lynn Lowery, in North Carolina’s Plott Balsam Mountains — the last mountain range before descending to Sylva.  Learn more...

  • A beach covered in sea turtle eggs and other debris washed ashore from Hurricane Dorian
    Information icon Debris and sea turtle eggs washed up by Hurricane Dorian at Archie Carr NWR. Photo by Erin Seney, UCF Marine Turtle Research Group.

    Dorian report: Sea-turtle nest losses could have been worse

    September 19, 2019 | 5 minute read

    Hurricane Dorian obliterated hundreds of sea-turtle nests at National Wildlife Refuges as it clawed north along the Atlantic coast earlier this month, officials with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) said. But it could have been much worse. The storm, wildlife refuge staff noted, had dissipated as it neared the fragile, sandy shores where turtles lay eggs. It obliterated some nests, but left others intact. Eroded sand dunes and a lost sea turtle egg at Archie Carr National Wildlife Refuge.  Learn more...

  • A small bird in hand with white patches on its wing and a red patch behind its eye
    Information icon A male red-cockaded woodpecker showing off the red feathers behind its head called a cockade. Photo © Robert B. Clontz, The Nature Conservancy.

    Joining forces

    August 27, 2019 | 7 minute read

    Fort Stewart, Georgia — As military partnerships go, this has to be one of the oddest, and strongest. The fighting men and women of the 3rd Infantry Division train alongside… red-cockaded woodpeckers. Ft. Stewart just west of Savannah and north of Hinesville, GA. Map by Roy Hewitt, USFWS. Soldiers maneuver the eastern edge of the army base under a canopy of longleaf pine where the iconic woodpeckers make their home.  Learn more...

  • Two biologists in wet suits and snorkle gear in a turbid stream looking for mussels
    Information icon Jay Mays and Brittany Barker-Jones discussing the mussel search on the French Broad River. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Mussel returns to French Broad River after 100-year absence

    August 20, 2019 | 5 minute read

    Asheville, North Carolina — As a trio of kids on inner tubes quietly floated down the French Broad River outside Rosman, North Carolina, a nearby snorkeler broke the river’s surface, disturbing the quiet with a quick clearing of water from his snorkel. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist Jason Mays was searching the river bottom for 300 wavy-rayed lampmussels, freshwater mussels stocked by the Service and the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission (NCWRC) in early June.  Learn more...

  • Pink flowers with petals in a conical shape and a deep red stigma.
    Information icon Heather Alley near an experimental population she planted for her master thesis. Photo courtesy of Heather Alley.

    With help from many partners, the endangered smooth coneflower fights to come back

    August 16, 2019 | 5 minute read

    Droopy and slender pink petals give it a daisy-like appearance. Delicate, yet fierce, with a tall and spiked-domed center, it thrives in places that aren’t exactly dainty. Along power line rights-of-way, roadsides, dry slopes, and other disturbed places, the smooth coneflower fights to defend its turf. Left unchecked, trees and shrubs can opportunistically overpower the open prairie-like spaces that wildflowers call home. The smooth coneflower is an endangered wild plant in the aster family.  Learn more...

  • Hundreds of small wildflowers grow on the back side of a row of solar panels.
    Information icon Native pollinator-friendly plants beneath the elevated end of the solar panels. Photo by Bryan Tompkins, USFWS.

    Service and partners see opportunities for declining pollinators on solar farms

    August 7, 2019 | 5 minute read

    Asheville, North Carolina — As Bryan Tompkins approaches a solar power farm in Rowan County, North Carolina, his eyes are not on the solar panels – an increasingly common sight in North Carolina. His attention rests on the plants growing around the solar panel array. Tompkins is a biologist in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Asheville Field Office, where he reviews federally-funded or authorized projects for wildlife impacts under a variety of federal laws, including the Endangered Species Act – the goal being to at least minimize negative wildlife impacts, and hopefully provide some benefits.  Learn more...

  • A man in a blue Bee Downtown shirt rests a smoker on top of a nearby hive as he prepares to give a beekeeping lesson.
    Information icon Nicholas Weaver and the hives he tends at Georgia Power. A beekeeper, Weaver tends to bees at corporate locations across Atlanta. Photo by Mark Davis, USFWS.

    The buzz about pollinators

    July 10, 2019 | 5 minute read

    Let’s get the first question out of the way. Has anyone been stung? No. That begs another question: Has Georgia Power gone into the bee buzz — er, biz? Again, no. The utility is the site for a honey-making operation, but officials so far aren’t sure what they’ll do with the thick, amber stuff. Those little dots surrounding Nicholas Weaver are bees. Getting stung, he says, is an occupational hazard.  Learn more...

  • A grass-like plant with white flowers emerges from the marsh.
    Information icon The proposed expansion would allow a population of the endangered bunched arrowhead to be conserved as part of Mountain Bogs National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    McKinney Tract in Greenville, South Carolina protects two rare plants

    June 5, 2019 | 2 minute read

    In the spring of 2019, South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) acquired in fee-simple a 55-acre tract called the McKinney Tract located in Greenville County, South Carolina. This tract was purchased with Recovery Land Acquisition from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and partner funding from SCDNR and Naturaland Trust. Other partners involved included Forever, Southern Environmental Law Center, South Carolina Native Plant Society, and the SC Plant Conservation Alliance.  Learn more...

News

  • A small yellow breasted bird with grey feathers.
    Information icon Kirtland’s warblers nest exclusively in jack pine stands. Photo by Joel Trick, USFWS.

    Partners celebrate successful recovery of beloved songbird

    October 8, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Bird enthusiasts from around the world travel to northern Michigan in hopes of catching sight of a Kirtland’s warbler, a small songbird once poised on the brink of extinction. Now the species is thriving thanks to decades of effort by a diverse group of dedicated partners. Due to the species’ remarkable recovery, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced that it no longer warrants protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).  Read the full story...

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