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Tag: North Carolina

The content below has been tagged with the term “North Carolina.”

Articles

  • Boy scouts walk in a line through a young stand of pine trees.
    Information icon The Cape Fear Council of the Boy Scouts of America has been helping restore longleaf pine at a camp in North Carolina. Photo by Jacob Jay.

    Planting for the future

    January 8, 2020 | 5 minute read

    Reveille sounds. Long lines of uniformed Boy Scouts circle the flagpole. Pledges and singing follow. Out beyond this morning ritual, stately young longleaf pine trees proudly peek over swaying grasses. The Cape Fear Council of the Boy Scouts of America is restoring the longleaf pine ecosystem and awakening its rich history at Camp Bowers in eastern North Carolina. They are contributing to the goal of the America’s Longleaf Initiative to bring back an ecosystem that once spanned from Virginia to Texas, and in North Carolina supports unique wildlife such as the Venus flytrap, which is considered at risk in the wild.  Learn more...

  • A small, fuzzy, brown bat baring teeth in the hands of a biologist
    Information icon Northern long-eared bat captured in Bladen County, NC. Photo by Gary Jordan, USFWS.

    Aiding the northern long-eared bat

    November 19, 2019 | 5 minute read

    Bats provide valuable ecosystem services that impact the world’s economy and our lives. They pollinate cash crops and forests, disperse seeds, produce fertilizer and control pests by devouring insects. Many bat species are in decline, however, due to habitat loss and disease, especially white-nose syndrome (WNS). The Service has been working with partners promoting conservation, research and innovation to fight back at the national level. In the eastern half of the U.  Learn more...

  • A green toad with dark spots in a biologist’s gloved hand
    Information icon Biologists at the Saratoga National Fish Hatchery in Wyoming hopped at the chance to raise the endangered Wyoming toad. Photo by USFWS.

    They’re growing what?

    November 6, 2019 | 9 minute read

    In Virginia and South Carolina hatcheries, biologists keep a close eye on shad and striped bass while taking time to focus on something that will never wear scales: mussels. And down in Florida, hatchery scientists charged with making sure rivers and streams are stocked with catfish and bass are singing the praises of a tiny bird they’re raising outside their labs. The Tishomingo National Fish Hatchery is growing alligator snapping turtles to boost that species’ population.  Learn more...

  • Two dozen or more conservationists gather for a discussion at high altitude on a cold, foggy morning.
    Information icon Service biologist, Sue Cameron, gives instructions on planting red spruce. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Mapping the sky islands

    October 9, 2019 | 7 minute read

    Asheville, North Carolina — On November 24, 1983, a Cessna 414A left Chicago en route to Sylva, North Carolina, a small town just south of the Blue Ridge Parkway. The plane’s last radar contact showed an altitude of 6,100 feet. About a mile later, at an altitude of about 6,000 feet, it crashed into the ridge between Waterrock Knob and Mount Lynn Lowery, in North Carolina’s Plott Balsam Mountains — the last mountain range before descending to Sylva.  Learn more...

  • A beach covered in sea turtle eggs and other debris washed ashore from Hurricane Dorian
    Information icon Debris and sea turtle eggs washed up by Hurricane Dorian at Archie Carr NWR. Photo by Erin Seney, UCF Marine Turtle Research Group.

    Dorian report: Sea-turtle nest losses could have been worse

    September 19, 2019 | 5 minute read

    Hurricane Dorian obliterated hundreds of sea-turtle nests at National Wildlife Refuges as it clawed north along the Atlantic coast earlier this month, officials with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) said. But it could have been much worse. The storm, wildlife refuge staff noted, had dissipated as it neared the fragile, sandy shores where turtles lay eggs. It obliterated some nests, but left others intact. Eroded sand dunes and a lost sea turtle egg at Archie Carr National Wildlife Refuge.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A group of about a dozen small triangular shellfish in shallow water.
    Information icon Yellow lance in the Tar River in North Carolina. Photo by Sarah McRae, USFWS.

    Proposed critical habitat and draft economic analysis for yellow lance mussel

    February 5, 2020 | 8 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is proposing to designate 319 river miles of critical habitat for the yellow lance mussel in 11 units within Maryland, Virginia and North Carolina. What is critical habitat? Critical habitat is defined by the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as the specific geographic areas that contain features essential to the conservation of an endangered or threatened species and that may require special management and protection.  Learn more...

News

  • New videos released on the history and future of prairies in the Piedmont

    February 14, 2020 | 2 minute read

    The Piedmont Prairie Partnership, a group of non-profit, state, and federal agencies, just released two videos documenting the history of the Piedmont prairies and the restoration work in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. Historically, much of the Piedmont was covered by prairies, some with scattered trees and some without. These open areas, maintained by fire, elk, bison and other animals, supported large numbers of flowering plants, pollinators, and wildlife including bobwhite quail.  Read the full story...

  • A group of about a dozen small triangular shellfish in shallow water.
    Information icon Yellow lance in the Tar River in North Carolina. Photo by Sarah McRae, USFWS.

    Service proposes critical habitat for yellow lance mussel

    February 5, 2020 | 4 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to designate critical habitat for the yellow lance freshwater mussel within Maryland, Virginia and North Carolina, including 154 river miles of habitat that overlap with other federally protected mussels and fish. Only areas currently occupied by the mussel, listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in 2018, are included in the proposal. A draft economic analysis on the impacts of this action indicates minimal costs for stakeholders and private landowners.  Read the full story...

  • A small, beige minnow-like fish with a dark stripe down its side
    Information icon Ozark chub. Photo by Dustin Lynch, Arkansas Natural Heritage Comission.

    Improved science and conservation partnerships mean a Southeastern fish and flowering plant do not need Endangered Species Act protections

    December 18, 2019 | 3 minute read

    Based on an extensive review of the best available science, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that the Ozark chub and the purpledisk honeycombhead do not face the threat of extinction now or in the foreseeable future. Protection of these species on conservation lands and new survey data helped inform the Service’s decisions not to list these species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). These not warranted findings are due in part to ESA-inspired partnerships between local, state and federal stakeholders, who collaborated to protect and conserve these species before they required federal protections.  Read the full story...

  • A small yellow breasted bird with grey feathers.
    Information icon Kirtland’s warblers nest exclusively in jack pine stands. Photo by Joel Trick, USFWS.

    Partners celebrate successful recovery of beloved songbird

    October 8, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Bird enthusiasts from around the world travel to northern Michigan in hopes of catching sight of a Kirtland’s warbler, a small songbird once poised on the brink of extinction. Now the species is thriving thanks to decades of effort by a diverse group of dedicated partners. Due to the species’ remarkable recovery, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced that it no longer warrants protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).  Read the full story...

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