skip to content

Tag: North Carolina

The content below has been tagged with the term “North Carolina.”

Articles

  • Two biologists in wet suits and snorkle gear in a turbid stream looking for mussels
    Information icon Jay Mays and Brittany Barker-Jones discussing the mussel search on the French Broad River. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Mussel returns to French Broad River after 100-year absence

    August 20, 2019 | 5 minute read

    Asheville, North Carolina — As a trio of kids on inner tubes quietly floated down the French Broad River outside Rosman, North Carolina, a nearby snorkeler broke the river’s surface, disturbing the quiet with a quick clearing of water from his snorkel. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist Jason Mays was searching the river bottom for 300 wavy-rayed lampmussels, freshwater mussels stocked by the Service and the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission (NCWRC) in early June.  Learn more...

  • Pink flowers with petals in a conical shape and a deep red stigma.
    Information icon Heather Alley near an experimental population she planted for her master thesis. Photo courtesy of Heather Alley.

    With help from many partners, the endangered smooth coneflower fights to come back

    August 16, 2019 | 5 minute read

    Droopy and slender pink petals give it a daisy-like appearance. Delicate, yet fierce, with a tall and spiked-domed center, it thrives in places that aren’t exactly dainty. Along power line rights-of-way, roadsides, dry slopes, and other disturbed places, the smooth coneflower fights to defend its turf. Left unchecked, trees and shrubs can opportunistically overpower the open prairie-like spaces that wildflowers call home. The smooth coneflower is an endangered wild plant in the aster family.  Learn more...

  • Hundreds of small wildflowers grow on the back side of a row of solar panels.
    Information icon Native pollinator-friendly plants beneath the elevated end of the solar panels. Photo by Bryan Tompkins, USFWS.

    Service and partners see opportunities for declining pollinators on solar farms

    August 7, 2019 | 5 minute read

    Asheville, North Carolina — As Bryan Tompkins approaches a solar power farm in Rowan County, North Carolina, his eyes are not on the solar panels – an increasingly common sight in North Carolina. His attention rests on the plants growing around the solar panel array. Tompkins is a biologist in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Asheville Field Office, where he reviews federally-funded or authorized projects for wildlife impacts under a variety of federal laws, including the Endangered Species Act – the goal being to at least minimize negative wildlife impacts, and hopefully provide some benefits.  Learn more...

  • A man in a blue Bee Downtown shirt rests a smoker on top of a nearby hive as he prepares to give a beekeeping lesson.
    Information icon Nicholas Weaver and the hives he tends at Georgia Power. A beekeeper, Weaver tends to bees at corporate locations across Atlanta. Photo by Mark Davis, USFWS.

    The buzz about pollinators

    July 10, 2019 | 5 minute read

    Let’s get the first question out of the way. Has anyone been stung? No. That begs another question: Has Georgia Power gone into the bee buzz — er, biz? Again, no. The utility is the site for a honey-making operation, but officials so far aren’t sure what they’ll do with the thick, amber stuff. Those little dots surrounding Nicholas Weaver are bees. Getting stung, he says, is an occupational hazard.  Learn more...

  • A grass-like plant with white flowers emerges from the marsh.
    Information icon The proposed expansion would allow a population of the endangered bunched arrowhead to be conserved as part of Mountain Bogs National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    McKinney Tract in Greenville, South Carolina protects two rare plants

    June 5, 2019 | 2 minute read

    In the spring of 2019, South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) acquired in fee-simple a 55-acre tract called the McKinney Tract located in Greenville County, South Carolina. This tract was purchased with Recovery Land Acquisition from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and partner funding from SCDNR and Naturaland Trust. Other partners involved included Forever, Southern Environmental Law Center, South Carolina Native Plant Society, and the SC Plant Conservation Alliance.  Learn more...

  • Eight fuzzy brown bats with large ears gathered in a small cluster on the roof of a cave.
    Information icon Small cluster of Virginia big-eared bats. Photo by Dave Riggs, CC BY-SA 2.0.

    Big-eared bat mystery solved in North Carolina

    March 21, 2019 | 6 minute read

    Asheville, North Carolina — A proposed highway widening project in 2010 led to the solution of a wildlife mystery, plus additional protection of North Carolina’s only endangered Virginia big-eared bat population. The Virginia big-eared bat was placed on the federal endangered species list in 1979. Found mainly in Virginia, West Virginia, and Kentucky, there is one population in North Carolina. In the early 1980s, scientists discovered two hibernation sites for that North Carolina population, a pair of caves at Grandfather Mountain.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A small catfish with brown and white markings and long barbells extending from its mouth.
    Information icon Carolina madtom. Photo by Scott Smith and Fritz Rohde.

    Proposed Endangered Species Act findings for the Carolina madtom and Neuse River waterdog

    May 21, 2019 | 18 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) taking? The Service is proposing to list the Carolina madtom as an endangered species throughout its range and the Neuse River waterdog as a threatened species throughout its range with a 4(d) rule. We are also proposing designation of critical habitat for both species and releasing a draft economic analysis. What is the difference between threatened and endangered species? Under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), an endangered species is currently in danger of becoming extinct throughout all or a significant portion of its range, while a threatened species is likely to become endangered in the foreseeable future.  Learn more...

News

  • An employee in uniform drains a large truck basin full of water and fish into a river.
    Information icon Edenton National Fish Hatchery manager Stephen Jackson watches lake sturgeon flow into the French Broad River. Photo by USFWS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes allowing fishing from Edenton National Fish Hatchery boardwalk and portion of shoreline

    May 28, 2019 | 1 minute read

    Edenton, North Carolina — Anglers wanting to try their luck at a couple of spots on Pembroke Creek may soon get the chance. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing allowing recreational fishing for all legal species in the creek from the boardwalk on the hatchery as well as the shoreline adjacent to the hatchery’s water intake. The areas would be open for anglers when the hatchery is open. Its daily hours are 7 a.  Read the full story...

  • A small catfish with brown and white markings and long barbells extending from its mouth.
    Information icon Carolina madtom. Photo by Scott Smith and Fritz Rohde.

    Carolina madtom and Neuse River waterdog proposed for Endangered Species Act protection

    May 21, 2019 | 5 minute read

    The venom in the stinging spines of the Carolina madtom’s fins is so potent that it earned the freshwater catfish the scientific name, Noturus furiosus. The Neuse River waterdog salamander, with its black spots and red external gills, looks like something out of a science fiction movie. Both species are part of North Carolina’s rich biological heritage, and due to ongoing threats are now only found in limited and shrinking areas of the state.  Read the full story...

  • A bird of prey flying over a wetland.
    Information icon Everglades snail kite at Lake Kissimmee, Florida. Photo by South Florida Wetland Management District.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of 36 Southeastern species

    April 11, 2019 | 6 minute read

    As part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of 36 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife, and plants. They are found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before June 10, 2019. These five-year reviews will ensure listing classifications under the ESA are accurate, and recommend changes in status where appropriate based on the latest science and analysis.  Read the full story...

Contact Us:

Looking for a media contact? Reach out to a regional spokesperson.

Share this page

Tweet this page on Twitter or follow @USFWSsoutheast

Share this page on Facebook or follow USFWSsoutheast.

LinkedIn

Share this page on LinkedIn