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Tag: North Carolina

The content below has been tagged with the term “North Carolina.”

Articles

A mussel with fringe around its opening partially burried in the sand on the river bottom.

Endangered mussel making a comeback in the French Broad River

March 22, 2018 | 5 minute readAsheville, North Carolina — In 1834, a freshwater mussel collected near the convergence of the Swannanoa and French Broad Rivers was recognized as a new species – the Appalachian elktoe. Eighty years later, Carnegie Museum curator and University of Pittsburg professor Arnold Ortman couldn’t find any elktoes in the French Broad River, attributing his failure to polluted water. Biologists search for Appalachian elktoes in the Mills River. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS. Learn more...

Appalachian elktoe in the Little River Translyvania County NC. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

Water cascades over the edge of a dam strewn with logs and debris

To the sea

December 15, 2017 | 3 minute readWho knows how long the great river ran unimpeded from the pine forests and hardwoods to the sea? Scientists can only estimate. But they can tell you when that great river resumed its restless push to the Atlantic Ocean: Nov. 22, 2017. On that day, the Milburnie Dam crumbled. It was the last structure impeding the Neuse River’s flow across eastern North Carolina to the mouth of the Pamlico Sound, 150 miles to the east. Learn more...

The Milburnie Dam, just east of Raleigh, has been demolished. The Neuse River now flows, unimpeded, about 150 miles to the Pamlico Sound. It clears the way for migratory fish to spawn upstream. Photo by Mike Wicker, USFWS.

A woodpecker perched on a tree with a bug in its mouth

The woodpecker’s journey

November 20, 2017It was getting dark. A light rain fell. Distant thunder rolled across the steamy, late-summer sky. The hunters were apprehensive. Their prey: endangered red-cockaded woodpeckers. Learn more...

A red-cockaded woodpecker has dinner outside its nesting cavity. Photo by USFWS.

Faq

A group of about a dozen small triangular shellfish in shallow water.

Final rule to list the yellow lance mussel as threatened

April 2, 2018 | 5 minute readHow does the final listing rule differ from the proposed listing rule? In preparing this final rule, we reviewed and fully considered 22 public comments on the proposed rule. This final rule incorporates minor changes to our proposed listing based on the comments we received. The Species Status Assessment report report was updated based on comments and some additional information provided; many small, non-substantive changes and corrections were made throughout the document including ensuring consistency of colors on maps, providing details about data sources, updating references in threats section, and minor clarifications. Learn more...

Yellow lance in the Tar River in North Carolina. Photo by Sarah McRae, USFWS.

News

Secretary Zinke announces more that $1.1 billion for sportsmen and conservation

March 20, 2018 | 4 minute readHoricon, Wisconsin – Today U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke traveled to Horicon, Wisconsin, where he announced more than $1.1 billion in annual national funding for state wildlife agencies from revenues generated by the Pittman-Robertson Wildlife Restoration and Dingell-Johnson Sport Fish Restoration (PRDJ) acts. The Secretary presented a ceremonial check to the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources for $34,966,603 while visiting the Horicon Marsh State Wildlife Area. Download state-by-state listings of the final Fiscal Year 2018 apportionments of the Wildlife Restoration Program fund and the Sport Fish Restoration Program fund. Read the full story...

A cluster of carnivorious plant heads with bright red/orange mouths.

Bat, snail, and popular plant may need endangered species protection

December 19, 2017 | 5 minute readMore research is needed on three species before U.S. Fish and Wildlife officials can determine whether to add them to the threatened and endangered species list. More scientific and commercial information will be compiled for the Venus flytrap, located in the Carolinas; oblong rocksnail, located in Alabama; and tricolored bat, located in 38 states, including Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee. The Service and its partners will continue to research the species’ life history, biological requirements and habitats to develop a Species Status Assessment (SSA) and 12-month finding. Read the full story...

Venus flytrap. Photo by Jennifer Koches, USFWS.

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