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Tag: North Carolina

The content below has been tagged with the term “North Carolina.”

Articles

  • A grass-like plant with white flowers emerges from the marsh.
    Information icon The proposed expansion would allow a population of the endangered bunched arrowhead to be conserved as part of Mountain Bogs National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    McKinney Tract in Greenville, South Carolina protects two rare plants

    June 5, 2019 | 2 minute read

    In the spring of 2019, South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) acquired in fee-simple a 55-acre tract called the McKinney Tract located in Greenville County, South Carolina. This tract was purchased with Recovery Land Acquisition from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and partner funding from SCDNR and Naturaland Trust. Other partners involved included Forever, Southern Environmental Law Center, South Carolina Native Plant Society, and the SC Plant Conservation Alliance.  Learn more...

  • Eight fuzzy brown bats with large ears gathered in a small cluster on the roof of a cave.
    Information icon Small cluster of Virginia big-eared bats. Photo by Dave Riggs, CC BY-SA 2.0.

    Big-eared bat mystery solved in North Carolina

    March 21, 2019 | 6 minute read

    Asheville, North Carolina — A proposed highway widening project in 2010 led to the solution of a wildlife mystery, plus additional protection of North Carolina’s only endangered Virginia big-eared bat population. The Virginia big-eared bat was placed on the federal endangered species list in 1979. Found mainly in Virginia, West Virginia, and Kentucky, there is one population in North Carolina. In the early 1980s, scientists discovered two hibernation sites for that North Carolina population, a pair of caves at Grandfather Mountain.  Learn more...

  • Water topples over a 25ft tall dam
    Information icon Hoosier Dam stood 25 feet tall and 235 feet across the Rocky River in Chatham County. It blocked the endangered Cape Fear shiner from reaching habitat upstream from 1922 until October 2018. Photo by Emily Wells, USFWS.

    North Carolina dam removal helps Rocky River and the endangered fish that lives there

    December 6, 2018 | 4 minute read

    The Cape Fear shiner, a federally protected North American minnow found only in central North Carolina, battles to survive with only one stronghold remaining in the lower reaches of the Rocky and Deep Rivers of North Carolina’s Upper Cape Fear River Basin. Many issues have piled up against this little fish, but a massive dam of reinforced concrete, averaging 25 feet tall and 235 feet across stood out, until recently, as a monumental obstacle to the species’ recovery.  Learn more...

  • A pine forest with trees snapped in half by high winds and a bent speed limit sign
    Information icon Tyndall Air Force Base pine forests were scissored by Hurricane Michael. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    After Hurricane Michael

    November 29, 2018 | 6 minute read

    Camilla, Georgia — Hurricane Michael barreled across prime Southern timber territory, damaging five million acres of pines and hardwoods and destroying nearly $1.7 billion worth of marketable trees. Habitat for many of the region’s at-risk species — red-cockaded woodpeckers, gopher tortoises, eastern indigo snakes — was sundered. Red-cockaded woodpecker in flight. Photo by Martjan Lammertink, U.S. Forest Service. Now, six weeks after Michael killed more than 45 people in Florida, Georgia, North Carolina and Virginia, forest owners salvage timber, clear stands and pray for a market rebound.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A small catfish with brown and white markings and long barbells extending from its mouth.
    Information icon Carolina madtom. Photo by Scott Smith and Fritz Rohde.

    Proposed Endangered Species Act findings for the Carolina madtom and Neuse River waterdog

    May 21, 2019 | 18 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) taking? The Service is proposing to list the Carolina madtom as an endangered species throughout its range and the Neuse River waterdog as a threatened species throughout its range with a 4(d) rule. We are also proposing designation of critical habitat for both species and releasing a draft economic analysis. What is the difference between threatened and endangered species? Under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), an endangered species is currently in danger of becoming extinct throughout all or a significant portion of its range, while a threatened species is likely to become endangered in the foreseeable future.  Learn more...

News

  • An employee in uniform drains a large truck basin full of water and fish into a river.
    Information icon Edenton National Fish Hatchery manager Stephen Jackson watches lake sturgeon flow into the French Broad River. Photo by USFWS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes allowing fishing from Edenton National Fish Hatchery boardwalk and portion of shoreline

    May 28, 2019 | 1 minute read

    Edenton, North Carolina — Anglers wanting to try their luck at a couple of spots on Pembroke Creek may soon get the chance. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing allowing recreational fishing for all legal species in the creek from the boardwalk on the hatchery as well as the shoreline adjacent to the hatchery’s water intake. The areas would be open for anglers when the hatchery is open. Its daily hours are 7 a.  Read the full story...

  • A small catfish with brown and white markings and long barbells extending from its mouth.
    Information icon Carolina madtom. Photo by Scott Smith and Fritz Rohde.

    Carolina madtom and Neuse River waterdog proposed for Endangered Species Act protection

    May 21, 2019 | 5 minute read

    The venom in the stinging spines of the Carolina madtom’s fins is so potent that it earned the freshwater catfish the scientific name, Noturus furiosus. The Neuse River waterdog salamander, with its black spots and red external gills, looks like something out of a science fiction movie. Both species are part of North Carolina’s rich biological heritage, and due to ongoing threats are now only found in limited and shrinking areas of the state.  Read the full story...

  • A bird of prey flying over a wetland.
    Information icon Everglades snail kite at Lake Kissimmee, Florida. Photo by South Florida Wetland Management District.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of 36 Southeastern species

    April 11, 2019 | 6 minute read

    As part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of 36 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife, and plants. They are found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before June 10, 2019. These five-year reviews will ensure listing classifications under the ESA are accurate, and recommend changes in status where appropriate based on the latest science and analysis.  Read the full story...

  • New regional director to head southeastern conservation efforts Fish and Wildlife Service

    December 10, 2018 | 2 minute read

    Service officials announced late last month that Leopoldo “Leo” Miranda will head the Service’s Southeast Region. The tract encompasses 10 southeastern states as well as Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.  Read the full story...

  • An inquisitive red wolf looks into the distance.
    Information icon Red wolf (Canis rufus). Photo by Valerie, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    Service extends red wolf review in North Carolina

    November 29, 2018 | 1 minute read

    In light of a federal court ruling issued earlier this month in the Eastern District of North Carolina, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is extending its review of a proposed rule to adapt its management of red wolves in the state. The additional review time will provide the Service the opportunity to fully evaluate the implications of the court decision.  Read the full story...

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