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Tag: Noonday Globe Snail

The content below has been tagged with the term “Noonday Globe Snail.”

Articles

  • A small grey snail with a beige/white shell on top of a fallen leaf.
    Information icon Noonday globe snail. Photo by J. Fridell, USFWS.

    Endangered snail not only survives forest fire, but is now found in places never before seen

    July 5, 2017 | 3 minute read

    Asheville, North Carolina - Wildlife biologists scaled the wall of the Nantahala Gorge on hands and knees - more climbing than hiking the steep terrain – searching for one of the rarest animals in the world in the wake of forest fires that burned through its habitat last winter. The noonday globe snail (Petera clarki nantahala) was placed on the federal endangered species list in 1978. The only place it was known to exist was a portion of the southern side of the Nantahala River Gorge, in North Carolina’s Swain County.  Learn more...

Podcasts

  • Dozens of green plants in the shape of a pitcher.
    Information icon Clump of green pitcher plants. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Endangered Species Day 2010

    May 18, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature May 22 is Endangered Species Day. The phrase endangered species often brings to mind animals like panda bears and elephants, but the Southern Appalachians is home to a plethora of fascinating imperiled species. Our region is home to the spruce-fir moss spider – the world’s smallest tarantula, coming in about the size of a pencil eraser. It lives in the moss beds beneath the spruce-fir forests on our highest mountaintops.  Learn more...

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