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Tag: New Jersey

The content below has been tagged with the term “New Jersey.”

Articles

  • A small green plant growing in a sand dune with bright red/pink stems.
    Seabeach amaranth at Onslow Beach, Camp Lejeune, NC. Photo by Lilibeth Serrano, USFWS.

    From Massachusetts to South Carolina, recovering seabeach amaranth

    December 7, 2017 | 6 minute read

    This is a story about people, places and a plant — but it’s more than just that. This is a story about faith in a tiny little seed and the huge potential for recovering a threatened species. First things first — the plant Most people have probably never heard of seabeach amaranth, but for such an obscure little dune plant, it bears a mighty burden. This low-growing annual colonizes newly disturbed habitats such as over-wash areas at the end of barrier islands and flat, low-lying areas along the foremost dunes.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A small black bird flies over a lush green marsh
    Information icon Eastern black rail in flight – Texas, April 2016. Photo © Jesse Huth, used with permission, Huth Avian Services.

    Proposed listing for the eastern black rail

    October 5, 2018 | 12 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is proposing to protect the eastern black rail, a small secretive marsh bird native to the United States, as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Partially migratory, the eastern black rail is known in as many as 36 states, plus multiple territories and countries in the Caribbean and Central and South America. It is one of four subspecies of black rail, which live in salt, brackish, and freshwater marshes.  Learn more...

News

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

    Service proposes to list the eastern black rail as threatened under the Endangered Species Act

    October 5, 2018 | 5 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and its partners are working to protect a small, secretive marsh bird that is in steep decline. Some populations of the eastern black rail along the Atlantic coast have dropped by as much as 90 percent, and with a relatively small total population remaining across the eastern United States, the Service is proposing to list the subspecies as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).  Read the full story...

Wildlife

  • Fuzzy yellow and purple flowers emerging from a green grass-like stalk.
    Information icon American chaffseed © Robert Sincliar. Copyright release form S://EA/Photo Permissions/american-chaffseed.pdf

    American chaffseed

    American chaffseed is generally found in habitats described as open, moist pine flatwoods, fire-maintained savannas, and flowers from April to June in the South, and from June to mid-July in the North.  Visit the species profile...

  • Three brown birds swimming on still water
    Information icon American wigeon. Photo by Mike Wintroath, AGFC.

    American wigeon

    American wigeon are a medium-sized dabbling duck, and males have a distinctive white patch on their head that historically gave them the nickname “baldpate.” This species can be aggressive when competing for food and is a highly flexible forager, equally at home stealing food from diving ducks in deep water or grazing on turf grasses in urban areas. Conservation status Low concern. Range American wigeons occur across all four North American flyways, but they are most abundant in the Pacific and Central flyways.  Visit the species profile...

  • Three brown birds with white spots on the edge of their wings standing in water
    Information icon Blue-winged teals. Photo by Clayton Ferrell, USFWS.

    Blue-winged teal

    Blue-winged teal are the second smallest duck in North America and are highly distinctive during flight due to their bright blue wing patch. Populations are highly responsive to wetland conditions in their breeding range; those years with many small temporary wetlands in the Prairie Pothole Region typically produce large hatches of this species. Conservation status Low concern. Related content Jul 14, 2014 | 2 minute read Podcasts Duck populations Range These long-distance migrants breed as far north as Alaska and throughout Canada, primarily nesting in the prairies of the central U.  Visit the species profile...

  • A colorful green/brown and red trout covered in small red spots.
    Information icon A wildlife biologist holds a small eastern brook trout. Photo by Steve Droter, Chesapeake Bay Program.

    Brook trout

    The brook trout is a fish native to the eastern United States, and is often referred to as speckled trout, spotted trout, brookie, and squaretail. “Brookies” are considered an indicator species, because they help indicate the health or overall quality of the waters they inhabit.  Visit the species profile...

  • A rust colored bird preening in the water.
    Information icon Canvasback. Photo by Clayton Ferrell, USFWS.

    Canvasback

    Canvasback is the largest species of diving duck in North America and is highly recognizable due to the male’s stark white body, contrasting with a deep maroon head and neck. This species has been nicknamed “bull-neck,” and referred to as the aristocrat of ducks. Because of its diving feeding style, it spends most of its time using moderately deep-water marshes and lakes where it roots in the sediment searching for its favorite food, plant tubers from submersed aquatic vegetation.  Visit the species profile...

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

    Eastern black rail

    Black rails are the smallest rails in North America. One of four recognized subspecies of black rail, the eastern black rail is perhaps the most secretive. This small inhabitant of shallow salt and freshwater marshes is rarely seen and has a distinctive “kick-ee-doo” call that is often heard at night.  Visit the species profile...

  • Two splotchy brown birds swimming in a pond
    Information icon A pair of gadwalls. Photo by Stacey Hayden, USFWS.

    Gadwall

    Sometimes known affectionately as the “gray duck” by hunters, gadwall are medium-sized dabbling ducks common across temperate areas worldwide. As their nickname indicates, both males and females have gray-brown to gray plumage that is less flashy than many other species. Conservation status Low concern. Related content Nov 12, 2018 | 2 minute read News Hunting season opens with a bang on Merritt Island Refuge Range Gadwall primarily nest in the Prairie Pothole Region of the north-central United States and Canada and, to a lesser extent, in southern portions of the boreal forest and prairie parklands.  Visit the species profile...

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