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Tag: National Key Deer Refuge

The content below has been tagged with the term “National Key Deer Refuge.”

Articles

  • A building built on steel footings ready for hurricane force winds.

    Service facilities built to withstand nature’s worst

    November 9, 2017 | 5 minute readHurricanes are never welcome, but they can prompt changes in buildings to make them better, stronger, and more capable of handling high water and even higher winds. Learn more...

    The rebuilt Grand Bay National Wildlife Refuge visitor's center built to withstand future storms.

  • A team of USFWS employees gather in a circle for directions from Incident Commander Sami Gray.

    A tough woman gets the job done

    October 16, 2017 | 10 minute readBig Pine Key, Florida – It was hot already at 8 a.m. with temperatures expected to soar under a cloudless, tropical sky. The men and few women gathered at the Nut Farm, a former coconut tree plantation tucked amid downed trees and storm-wracked buildings, were receiving their daily marching orders. It had been a week since Irma and her 180 mph winds came ashore a couple of Keys over, and the U. Learn more...

    Incident commander Sami Gray holds a morning briefing. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

  • Palm and mangrove trees snapped like twigs.

    Service employees joining Irma response effort

    September 15, 2017 | 7 minute readBig Pine Key, Florida – It had all the makings of a thankless, dangerous and depressing task, but Jon Wallace knew – or thought he knew – what he was facing. Learn more...

    Damaged palm trees and mangroves on Cudjoe Key, Florida. Photo by Glenn Fawcett, U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

News

  • A beautiful sunset on the water with three kayaks one with a dog on board.

    Third annual Outdoor Fest to showcase Florida Keys National Wildlife Refuges

    February 15, 2018 | 4 minute readGet an up-close take on the great outdoors with the Florida Keys National Wildlife Refuge system celebration Saturday, March 10th through Saturday, March 17th, with the third annual Outdoor Fest. Read the full story...

    Participants enjoy FAVOR’s monthly Full Moon Kayak adventure, a trip that goes north into Great White Heron National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Mary Lou Dickson.

  • Two small deer walking across a street.

    Florida Keys national wildlife refuges visitor center re-opens with modified hours due to Hurricane Irma

    November 29, 2017 | 2 minute readThe Florida Keys National Wildlife Refuges Complex Visitor Center located at 179 Key Deer Blvd. in the Big Pine Key shopping plaza has now re-opened with modified hours and days on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Saturdays from 10 am- 3 pm. This Visitor Center serves the National Key Deer Refuge, Crocodile Lake NWR, Great White Heron NWR and Key West NWR. Residents and visitors are welcome to come on in, say hello and take advantages of the opportunities offered. Read the full story...

    Pair of Key deer. Photo by Bree McGhee, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

  • A small deer in the trunk of a car.

    Defendants sentenced for illegal take of endangered Key deer

    November 1, 2017 | 3 minute readTwo South Florida residents, who captured and restrained three Florida Key deer on Big Pine Key, were sentenced Oct. 31, 2017, in federal court in Key West for violations of the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Erik Damas Acosta, 18, of Miami Gardens, and Tumani A. Younge, 23, of Tamarac, previously pled guilty for their involvement in the July 2, 2017 incident in Monroe County, Florida. United States District Court Judge Jose E. Read the full story...

    One of three Key deer found in the car of two South Florida residents. Photo by USFWS.

  • A hand painted sign on plywood welcoming residents back to the Keys

    Florida Keys National Wildlife Refuges Complex phased re-opening

    October 30, 2017 | 3 minute readOn September 5, 2017, The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service closed all facilities and trails and cancelled all planned programs in the Crocodile Lake National Wildlife Refuge on Key Largo, the National Key Deer Refuge on Big Pine Key and the Key West and Great White Heron National Wildlife Refuges in the lower Keys as a result of Hurricane Irma. Like our neighbors, the Refuges and Refuge infrastructure sustained the whole spectrum of hurricane damage ranging from cosmetic to total destruction. Read the full story...

    Welcoming residents home to the Keys. Photo by USFWS.

  • A small deer with velvet covered antlers in a recently burned forest.

    First, do no harm: keeping wildlife wild and healthy

    October 10, 2017 | 3 minute readVero Beach, Florida – The old doctors’ adage “First, do no harm” also applies to wildlife, in this case Key deer. Legitimately trying to help in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma, well-meaning people have been providing a variety of food products (corn, dog/cat food, etc.) for Key deer and other wildlife. But feeding them could do more harm than good. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) strongly urges the public not to feed wildlife, particularly Key deer. Read the full story...

    A Key deer in velvet. Photo by USFWS.

  • A small deer with two small emerging antlers lays on a slab of concrete while taking a drink of water from plastic tupperware.

    Thirsty Key deer get a helping hand from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the public

    September 22, 2017 | 6 minute readBig Pine Key, Florida – Key deer, the lovably docile and locally iconic herbivores that meander across the piney marshlands and in-town streets of the Lower Keys, were hit hard by Hurricane Irma. Some survivors seem listless and dehydrated a week after Irma wracked this hard-hit island, home to National Key Deer Refuge. The storm’s surge – 4 feet high in places – inundated freshwater drinking holes turning them salty and unpalatable. Read the full story...

    A dehydrated Key deer drinks water provided by USFWS at National Key Deer Refuge. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

  • An USFWS employee in uniform looks at a small screen to register the salinity level of a small pond.

    Community assistance opportunity to help Florida Keys wildlife

    September 20, 2017 | 3 minute readThe U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) completed surveys of areas known to provide fresh water to wildlife in the National Key Deer Refuge (No Name and Big Pine Keys west to Sugarloaf Key) following Hurricane Irma. Due to the storm surge from Hurricane Irma, salinity levels in fresh water wetlands are on average higher than acceptable levels for most wildlife species, including the endangered Key deer, resident and migratory birds, rabbits, butterflies, and other species. Read the full story...

    Chris Eggleston, project leader at the Southwest Louisiana NWR Complex tests salinity levels on the National Key Deer Refuge. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

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