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Tag: Mussel

The content below has been tagged with the term “Mussel.”

Articles

  • A free-flowing river with sandy banks and large, green, mature trees.
    Information icon Site of the former Green River lock and dam No. 6 across from Mammoth Cave National Park. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    With dam removed, Green River goes with the flow

    September 24, 2019 | 10 minute read

    Brownsville, Kentucky — The blacktop, like so many others, ends at the Green River. A few fire rings and Bud Light cans litter the banks. Swallowtail butterflies flit among the oaks, poplars and sycamores. The river ambles unobstructed this warm summer day. There’s not much to see at the popular fishing spot across from Mammoth Cave National Park. It’s what you don’t see that matters. Two years ago a decrepit concrete lock and dam straddled the river posing a serious hazard to swimmers, kayakers and underwater creatures.  Learn more...

  • Water topples over a 25ft tall dam
    Information icon Hoosier Dam stood 25 feet tall and 235 feet across the Rocky River in Chatham County. It blocked the endangered Cape Fear shiner from reaching habitat upstream from 1922 until October 2018. Photo by Emily Wells, USFWS.

    North Carolina dam removal helps Rocky River and the endangered fish that lives there

    December 6, 2018 | 4 minute read

    The Cape Fear shiner, a federally protected North American minnow found only in central North Carolina, battles to survive with only one stronghold remaining in the lower reaches of the Rocky and Deep Rivers of North Carolina’s Upper Cape Fear River Basin. Many issues have piled up against this little fish, but a massive dam of reinforced concrete, averaging 25 feet tall and 235 feet across stood out, until recently, as a monumental obstacle to the species’ recovery.  Learn more...

  • An outstretched hand holding a dozen mussels marked with id numbers
    Information icon Carolina heelsplitters ready to be stocked. Photo by FWS.

    Private landowners step up to save the Carolina Heelsplitter

    September 28, 2018 | 2 minute read

    Ellison McDow and his grandfather Donnie Evans displaying Carolina heelsplitters that will soon be released on Mr. Evan’s property. Photo by FWS. South Carolina, like many states in the Southeast Region, is mostly made up of private lands. Therefore, these lands and their owners are crucial to any effort aimed at recovery of endangered species. Last fall, a number of private entities voluntarily contributed to the ongoing recovery efforts for the critically endangered Carolina heelsplitter, a freshwater mussel.  Learn more...

  • Four half mussel shells. The interior of the shells are irodescent pink/purple while the outisde are striated with brown and orange markings.
    Information icon Purple cat’s paw mussels. Female specemin on top, male on bottom. Photo by Monte A. McGregor, Ph D., KYDFWR.

    ‘From the brink’

    October 4, 2017 | 6 minute read

    You cannot talk with biologists about mussels without delving into the shelled creatures’ sex lives. We’re not discussing impassioned grappling on a stream bed, either. No. For mussels to thrive, they need more inducement than a come-hither glance, the music of moving water. Sometimes they need scientists — one in a snorkeling mask, another with a mixture containing rabbit blood. Let us go to Killbuck Creek, an Ohio stream that curls through wood and field until it finds the Wahonding River, a tributary of the Ohio River.  Learn more...

  • Wolf Creek continues mussel culture

    July 19, 2017 | 1 minute read

    Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery staff decided to expand this year when it came to culturing freshwater mussels in suspended cages in Lake Cumberland in Russell County, Kentucky.  Learn more...

  • A dozen dark mussels in a propagation tank with sandy substrate.
    Carolina heelsplitter mussels. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Musseling back from near extinction

    June 12, 2017 | 7 minute read

    Only an estimated 154 Carolina heelsplitters remain in the wild. A shocking revelation for a species that’s been listed as endangered since 1993, but biologists with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) will not give up. Finding the Carolina heelsplitter, one of the most imperiled freshwater mussels in the Southeast, will bring delight to any biologist lucky enough to wade in its waters. Carolina heelsplitter. Photo by USFWS.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A group of about a dozen small triangular shellfish in shallow water.
    Information icon Yellow lance in the Tar River in North Carolina. Photo by Sarah McRae, USFWS.

    Final rule to list the yellow lance mussel as threatened

    April 2, 2018 | 5 minute read

    How does the final listing rule differ from the proposed listing rule? In preparing this final rule, we reviewed and fully considered 22 public comments on the proposed rule. This final rule incorporates minor changes to our proposed listing based on the comments we received. The Species Status Assessment report report was updated based on comments and some additional information provided; many small, non-substantive changes and corrections were made throughout the document including ensuring consistency of colors on maps, providing details about data sources, updating references in threats section, and minor clarifications.  Learn more...

News

  • Seven small brownish-yellow mussels held in open hands by a biologist.
    Information icon Atlantic pigtoes ready for release. Photo by USFWS.

    Fish and Wildlife Service proposes threatened status for declining mussel

    October 10, 2018 | 5 minute read

    The Atlantic pigtoe, a freshwater mussel native to waters from Virginia to Georgia, has lost more than half of its historical range, and remaining populations may not be sustainable over time. To help this species and its habitat, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to extend protection for it as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The Service also has identified areas that are essential for conservation of this freshwater mussel and proposes to designate 539 river miles in 16 units as critical habitat.  Read the full story...

  • A group of about a dozen small triangular shellfish in shallow water.
    Information icon Yellow lance in the Tar River in North Carolina. Photo by Sarah McRae, USFWS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service lists the yellow lance mussel as threatened under the Endangered Species Act

    April 2, 2018 | 3 minute read

    Today, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced that the yellow lance mussel will be listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) following a rigorous evaluation of the best available science. Partnerships with state wildlife agencies and others have already been established to work toward improving habitat conditions for the mussel, which is one of nature’s most diligent water filterers. Yellow lance current range.  Read the full story...

  • A hand plunges into shallow water to place a tiny mussel with id number on the stream's rocky bottom.
    Golden riffleshell mussel gets placed in Indian Creek. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Clinch River mussel pulled back from the brink of extinction

    October 16, 2017 | 6 minute read

    The plight of the golden riffleshell, which is listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act, took a leap forward on September 21, as 700 captively-reared individuals were released into three sites – on Indian Creek, and on the Clinch River on the edge of Richlands, Virginia, and further upstream at a site owned by The Nature Conservancy.  Read the full story...

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