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Tag: Monarch

The content below has been tagged with the term “Monarch.”

Articles

  • Hundreds of small wildflowers grow on the back side of a row of solar panels.
    Information icon Native pollinator-friendly plants beneath the elevated end of the solar panels. Photo by Bryan Tompkins, USFWS.

    Service and partners see opportunities for declining pollinators on solar farms

    August 7, 2019 | 5 minute read

    Asheville, North Carolina — As Bryan Tompkins approaches a solar power farm in Rowan County, North Carolina, his eyes are not on the solar panels – an increasingly common sight in North Carolina. His attention rests on the plants growing around the solar panel array. Tompkins is a biologist in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Asheville Field Office, where he reviews federally-funded or authorized projects for wildlife impacts under a variety of federal laws, including the Endangered Species Act – the goal being to at least minimize negative wildlife impacts, and hopefully provide some benefits.  Learn more...

  • Ten plus monarch butterflies perched on a single yellow plant.
    Information icon Monarch butterflies gathering in Chenier Plain coastal prairie. Photo by Woody Woodrow, USFWS.

    Monarchs on the ranch

    April 18, 2019 | 3 minute read

    Perryville, Arkansas — Diamond TR Ranch is a 340-acre working ranch located on Arkansas Highway 10 west of Little Rock. The ranch is divided by the Maumelle River which provides 95 percent of the input for Lake Maumelle, a source of drinking water for about 450,000 residents of central Arkansas. When I first pulled up to the ranch I was greeted by a man who had clearly been up since before sunrise.  Learn more...

  • A butterfly covered in white spots with orange and yellow wings perched on a purple flower.
    Information icon A monarch butterfly on a purple plant with bright colors in the background. Photo by Christine Lisiewski.

    Teeing up conservation

    January 29, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Most people view golf courses as swaths of perfectly cropped and contoured grass, closer to artifice than raw nature. As many golfers can attest, however, most of the golf course outside the boundaries of greens and fairways is wild and unruly, and can be a difficult place to locate an errant ball. “About 70 percent of most golf course acreage is managed for out-of-play areas,” said Dr. Kimberly Erusha, managing director of the U.  Learn more...

  • A white sign that reads "Monarch Butterfly Festival, October 27th, St. Marks NWR, 850-925-6121"
    Information icon The festival takes place Oct. 27 at the refuge, located on Apalachee Bay on the Florida Panhandle. Photo by Mark Davis, USFWS.

    It’s monarch time

    October 24, 2018 | 5 minute read

    St. Marks, Florida — And now for a small bit of good news in a part of the country where a hurricane has made nearly every tale bad: The Monarch Butterfly Festival will take place as planned. Walk, drive and — yes — fly to the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge to celebrate that colorful flutterer, Danaus plexippus. The festival is Oct. 27 at a refuge where Hurricane Michael came calling earlier this month.  Learn more...

  • A small garden with a few small shrubs and plants surrounded by concrete pavers.
    Information icon The butterfly garden at Warm Springs NFH. Photo by Alexander Londono, USFWS.

    Warm Springs butterfly garden gets expansion

    July 17, 2018 | 1 minute read

    Warm Springs National Fish Hatchery in Georgia continues to add to its butterfly garden with the expertise of hatchery manager Carlos Echevarria, who has brought the love of his lifelong hobby to the hatchery garden. With the addition of 83 new plants and 14 different species to the current 32 butterfly milkweeds, the garden will support all types of pollinators and will be a magnificent sight for all to enjoy. This ongoing pollinator restoration program will further help to recover endangered and threatened pollinators such as the the monarch butterfly.  Learn more...

  • Aerial photo of the education center with colorful fields of flowers and a red visitors center.
    Information icon The Fred Berry Conservation Education Center in Arkansas sits on 21 acres donated by a retired schoolteacher. The center is restoring some of the land to native grassland/savanna habitat with funding provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program. Photo by Arkansas Game and Fish Commission.

    One project, many outcomes

    February 28, 2018 | 3 minute read

    One of the great things about habitat improvement projects is that a seemingly simple project can lead to many conservation outcomes. That has been the case with the native grassland restoration project on the Fred Berry Conservation Education Center, located on Crooked Creek in Marion County, Arkansas. The 421-acre property, which is managed by the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission (AGFC), lies within a long 2.75-mile bend of Crooked Creek, a premier smallmouth bass stream, in the Arkansas Ozarks.  Learn more...

  • two yellow flowers growing out of very sandy soil.
    Information icon Ground chokecherry. Photo by USFWS.

    Sowing plants to reap dunes

    February 28, 2018 | 4 minute read

    Restoration biologist Kate Healy felt the sun on her face as she stood on a sandy stretch of beach along Alabama’s Gulf coast. It was an unseasonably warm day on Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge, and Healy, a biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Gulf Restoration Office in Fairhope, Alabama, was ready to get to work. Kate Healy and Jackie Sablan plant ground chokecherry at Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge in Alabama.  Learn more...

  • Purple/grey and bright orange flowers bloom in a grassy field.
    Information icon Two species of milkweed, common and butterfly, grow wild in the barrens. Milkweed is a favorite plant of monarch butterflies. Photo by J. Brent Harrel, USFWS.

    Partners join to conserve rare prairie barrens in Kentucky

    August 31, 2017 | 3 minute read

    Monarch butterflies descend on the fields in droves, drawn by the abundance of milkweed, their favorite pollinator plant. Endangered northern long-eared and Indiana bats swoop through the sky. On the ground, biodiversity abounds, with rare plants like scurf pea and false gromwell. This little Eden - 160 acres now owned by the non-profit Southern Conservation Corps (SCC) – is a combination of forest and extremely rare prairie barrens habitat in Garrard County, a mostly rural county in central Kentucky.  Learn more...

  • Vegetation grows out of sand dunes at the beach.
    Information icon Dunes on Perdue Unit at Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by USFWS.

    Oil spill funds help protect shorebird nesting and improve monarch butterfly habitat

    May 18, 2017 | 3 minute read

    The sparkling beaches of Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge in Alabama attract visitors of all shapes and size—and species. Bon Secour’s beaches and dunes are visited not only by tens of thousands of people each year but also by the many kinds of wildlife our refuge managers are charged with protecting and preserving every day. On any warm spring day at Bon Secour, you may find sunbathers, swimmers, nature lovers, birds, beach mice, crabs, foxes, insects and scores of others.  Learn more...

News

  • A butterfly covered in white spots with orange and yellow wings perched on a purple flower.
    Information icon A monarch butterfly on a purple plant with bright colors in the background. Photo by Christine Lisiewski.

    Service distributes nearly $50 million to support state wildlife conservation projects

    March 21, 2016 | 3 minute read

    Species across the nation will benefit from almost $50 million in funding allocated to state wildlife agencies by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service through the State Wildlife Grants (SWG) program. The program provides critical support for imperiled species and habitats listed in approved State Wildlife Action Plans. All 50 state and U.S. territorial wildlife agencies have such plans, which proactively protect species in greatest conservation need. “State wildlife agencies are critical in protecting America’s wild places and the animals that live there.  Read the full story...

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