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Tag: Monarch Butterfly

The content below has been tagged with the term “Monarch Butterfly.”

Articles

  • A small garden with a few small shrubs and plants surrounded by concrete pavers.

    Warm Springs butterfly garden gets expansion

    July 17, 2018 | 1 minute readWarm Springs National Fish Hatchery in Georgia continues to add to its butterfly garden with the expertise of hatchery manager Carlos Echevarria, who has brought the love of his lifelong hobby to the hatchery garden. With the addition of 83 new plants and 14 different species to the current 32 butterfly milkweeds, the garden will support all types of pollinators and will be a magnificent sight for all to enjoy. This ongoing pollinator restoration program will further help to recover endangered and threatened pollinators such as the the monarch butterfly. Learn more...

    The butterfly garden at Warm Springs NFH. Photo by Alexander Londono, USFWS.

  • Aerial photo of the education center with colorful fields of flowers and a red visitors center.

    One project, many outcomes

    February 28, 2018 | 3 minute readOne of the great things about habitat improvement projects is that a seemingly simple project can lead to many conservation outcomes. That has been the case with the native grassland restoration project on the Fred Berry Conservation Education Center, located on Crooked Creek in Marion County, Arkansas. The 421-acre property, which is managed by the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission (AGFC), lies within a long 2.75-mile bend of Crooked Creek, a premier smallmouth bass stream, in the Arkansas Ozarks. Learn more...

    The Fred Berry Conservation Education Center in Arkansas sits on 21 acres donated by a retired schoolteacher. The center is restoring some of the land to native grassland/savanna habitat with funding provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program. Photo by Arkansas Game and Fish Commission.

  • two yellow flowers growing out of very sandy soil.

    Sowing plants to reap dunes

    February 28, 2018 | 4 minute readRestoration biologist Kate Healy felt the sun on her face as she stood on a sandy stretch of beach along Alabama’s Gulf coast. It was an unseasonably warm day on Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge, and Healy, a biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Gulf Restoration Office in Fairhope, Alabama, was ready to get to work. Kate Healy and Jackie Sablan plant ground chokecherry at Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge in Alabama. Learn more...

    Ground chokecherry. Photo by USFWS.

  • Vegetation grows out of sand dunes at the beach.

    Oil spill funds help protect shorebird nesting and improve monarch butterfly habitat

    May 18, 2017 | 3 minute readThe sparkling beaches of Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge in Alabama attract visitors of all shapes and size—and species. Bon Secour’s beaches and dunes are visited not only by tens of thousands of people each year but also by the many kinds of wildlife our refuge managers are charged with protecting and preserving every day. On any warm spring day at Bon Secour, you may find sunbathers, swimmers, nature lovers, birds, beach mice, crabs, foxes, insects and scores of others. Learn more...

    Dunes on Perdue Unit at Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by USFWS.

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