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Tag: Mississippi Ecological Services Field Office

The content below has been tagged with the term “Mississippi Ecological Services Field Office.”

Articles

  • A small fish covered in small, colorful polka dots of red and black
    Information icon The Bayou darter is only found in one small watershed in Mississippi, and is listed as threatened under the ESA. Photo by Matt Wagner, Mississippi Dept. of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks.

    Partners for Fish and Wildlife helps Mississippi landowners, threatened fish

    May 16, 2018 | 3 minute read

    The Bayou Pierre River meanders for 95 miles through southwestern Mississippi, where it eventually flows into the mighty Mississippi River. More than 60 different kinds of fish make their home in its watershed, and one of them, the Bayou darter, has been listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act since 1975. It’s the only place in the world where the little 2-inch fish is found. The darter likes shallow, fast-flowing streams with gravel streambeds, and those are plentiful in the Bayou Pierre watershed, although not as plentiful as they used to be.  Learn more...

News

  • Two black and white birds on the edge of a body of water.
    Information icon Interior least tern. Photo by USFWS.

    Recovery of America’s smallest tern prompts proposal to delist

    October 23, 2019 | 5 minute read

    When the interior least tern was listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in 1985, there were fewer than 2,000 birds and only a few dozen nesting sites scattered across a once-expansive range that covered America’s Great Plains and Lower Mississippi Valley. Today there are more than 18,000 interior least terns at more than 480 nesting sites in 18 states, thanks to decades of innovative conservation efforts and diverse partnerships among local, state and federal stakeholders.  Read the full story...

  • A light brown snake with darker black and brown markings on a green vine.
    Puerto Rican boa. Photo by Jan Paul Zegarra.

    Service announces recovery plan revisions for 43 species, to assist in measuring progress and addressing threats

    August 5, 2019 | 5 minute read

    As part of an agency-wide effort to advance the recovery of our nation’s most imperiled species, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has made publicly available draft revisions for 21 recovery plans that provide a recovery roadmap for 43 federally protected species. This batch of recovery plan revisions is part of the Department of the Interior’s Agency Priority Performance Goals. The effort calls for all recovery plans to include quantitative criteria on what constitutes recovery by September 2019.  Read the full story...

  • A green plant with serrated edges and a brown stem with a cylindrical orange flower.
    Information icon *Gesneria pauciflora* (no common name). Photo by Jan Paul Zegarra, USFWS.

    Service announces recovery plan revisions for 53 species, to assist in measuring progress and addressing threats

    August 5, 2019 | 5 minute read

    As part of an agency-wide effort to advance the recovery of our nation’s most imperiled species, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has made publicly available draft revisions for 28 Endangered Species Act (ESA) recovery plans that provide a recovery roadmap for 53 federally protected species. This batch of recovery plan revisions is part of the Department of the Interior’s Agency Priority Performance Goals, which call for all recovery plans to include quantitative criteria on what constitutes recovery, by September 2019.  Read the full story...

  • Bright red flowers emerge from a bog with a forest in the background.
    Information icon Mountain sweet pitcher plant patch in Butt CPA. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of 53 Southeastern species

    June 20, 2019 | 9 minute read

    As part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of 53 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife, and plants. These species are found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before August, 19, 2019. These five-year reviews will ensure listing classifications under the ESA are accurate and recommend changes in status where appropriate based on the latest science and analysis.  Read the full story...

  • A low growing shrub with bright purple flowers.
    Information icon Endangered Pyne’s ground-plum. Photo by NPS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of 35 Southeastern species

    May 7, 2018 | 5 minute read

    As part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of 35 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife, and plants. These species are found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before July 6, 2018. These five-year reviews will ensure listing classifications under the ESA are accurate and recommend changes in status where appropriate based on the latest science and analysis.  Read the full story...

  • A tiny yellow/orange frog with big round eyes.
    Coqui Llanero. Photo by Luis J. Villanueva CC BY-NC-SA 2.0.

    Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of eight southeastern species

    March 9, 2018 | 3 minute read

    As part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of eight endangered fish, wildlife, and plants. These species are found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before May 11, 2018. These five-year reviews will ensure listing classifications under the ESA are accurate and recommend changes in status where appropriate based on the latest science and analysis.  Read the full story...

Wildlife

  • A mussel sitting on rocky substrate with rays like growth rings on a tree and dark vertical stiping.
    Information icon Cumberland combshell. Photo by Dick Biggins, USFWS.

    Cumberland combshell

    The Cumberlandian combshell has a thick solid shell with a smooth to clothlike periostracum (thin, skin-like coating), which is yellow to tawny brown in color with narrow green broken rays.  Visit the species profile...

  • A brown and black mussel with growth striations sitting on a rock.
    Information icon Close-up of endangered mussel from the Ohio River. Photo by Craig Stihler, USFWS.

    Pink mucket

    The Appalachian elktoe has a thin, kidney-shaped shell, extending to about 4 inches. Juveniles generally have a yellowish-brown periostracum (outer shell surface), while the periostracum of the adults is usually dark brown to greenish-black in color.  Visit the species profile...

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