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Tag: Migratory Birds

The content below has been tagged with the term “Migratory Birds.”

Articles

  • A painting of a white headed duck with teal colored wing feathers swimming in greenish water.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service invites student artists to participate in 2019 Georgia Junior Duck Stamp program competition

    February 19, 2019 | 2 minute readThe U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is currently accepting student entries postmarked by midnight Friday, March 15, for the 2019 Junior Duck Stamp Conservation and Design Program competition. The Georgia Junior Duck Stamp competition recognizes Georgia’s top student waterfowl artists. Public, private, home-schooled, and art studio students from kindergarten through high school are invited to compete for recognition, prizes and scholarships in an activity that promotes the conservation of America’s wetlands and waterfowl habitat. Learn more...

    2018-2019 Junior Duck Stamp.

  • A woman holding an award flanked on both sides by leadership from the region and the migratory birds program

    Karen Frizzell reflects on 40 years of federal service

    September 27, 2018 | 3 minute readKaren Frizzell, administrative support assistant for two Migratory Bird Field Offices, celebrates 40 years of federal service this year. Thirty-one of those 40 years have been with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Karen serves the North Carolina Migratory Bird Office located in Columbia, North Carolina, and the East Gulf Coastal Plain Joint Venture Office in Atlanta, Georgia, and Daphne, Alabama. Karen, who lives in Auburn, Alabama, and attended Auburn University, calls her career experiences “AUsome,” filled with many happy memories. Learn more...

    Karen Frizzell receives her 40-year plaque. Left to Right: John Stanton, Mike Oetker, Karen Frizzell, Catherine Rideout, and Dean Demarest. Photo by Phil Kloer, FWS.

  • A Service employee in uniform uses a small booklet to help students identify birds.

    Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge hosts inaugural Christmas Bird Count for Kids

    January 24, 2018 | 2 minute readWhat could be better than spending a morning outside, taking in the fresh air, and looking for birds on a national wildlife refuge? On Dec. 30, 2017, the first Christmas Bird Count for Kids took place at Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge in south Florida. The original Christmas Bird Count is an annual bird survey organized by the National Audubon Society, attended mainly by adults and birding clubs. The counting tradition began more than 100 years ago and is one of the oldest wildlife surveys in the world. Learn more...

    Ana Castillo-Ruiz teaches young birders how to identify a little blue heron. Photo, Ira Rappaport, FWS volunteer

  • A sandy beach with a tuft of vegetation following a jetty.

    A sanctuary for at-risk birds

    July 12, 2017 | 3 minute readWolf Island National Wildlife Refuge, Georgia – It rained heavily the night before, and the puffy white clouds on the horizon presaged more storms heading for the Georgia coast. At 7 am., with the tide receding, Tim Keyes hustled the Carolina Skiff into the Altamaha Sound where the same-name river meets the sea. Destination: the low-lying barrier islands off limits to the public, but teeming with at-risk, threatened and endangered birds. Learn more...

    Wolf Island. Photo by Nicole Vidal, USFWS.

  • A bird on the wing with black feathers on its wings and white breast.

    Tracking “Panther,” the swallow-tailed kite

    November 28, 2016 | 2 minute readJune 8, 2016, was an exciting day at Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge when the Avian Research and Conservation Institute captured a swallow-tailed kite, now known as “Panther”, and fitted him with a GPS tracking transmitter funded by Friends of the Florida Panther Refuge. Panther has given collaborators the opportunity to follow his travels from refuge nesting grounds, more than 600 miles up to South Carolina, then back down to cross the Gulf of Mexico and the Andes for southbound migration. Learn more...

    Swallow-tailed kite. Photo by Walter Rodriguez, CC BY 2.0.

Birds

Lafayette

  • Thousands of geese taking flight.

    Migratory birds

    The Migratory Bird Treaty Act was passed in 1918. That Act prohibits the taking, killing, possession, transportation, and importation of migratory birds, their eggs, parts, and nests; except when specifically authorized by the U.S. Department of the Interior. While the Act has no provision for allowing unauthorized take, the Service realizes that some birds may be harmed or killed as a result of project implementation even when reasonable measures to protect birds are implemented. Learn more...

    Geese flocking overhead. Photo by Corey Douglas.

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