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Tag: Louisiana

The content below has been tagged with the term “Louisiana.”

Articles

  • A scruffy looking white-tailed deer that appears to be ill and underweight.

    Stopping a killer

    October 26, 2018 | 6 minute readAtlanta, Georgia — Two Louisiana men, who plead guilty to smuggling diseased white-tailed deer into Mississippi, were recently sentenced to three years probation and ordered to pay $140,000 in fees and fines. The punishment sent an unmistakable message that law enforcement and conservation agencies take very seriously the threat chronic-wasting disease (CWD) poses to the South’s deer and deer-hunting industry. Their fears are well-founded. A sickly white-tail tested positive for CWD near Tupelo in early October. Learn more...

    A white-tailed deer with Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD). Photo by Wyoming Game and Fish Dept.

Faq

  • A small black bird flies over a lush green marsh

    Proposed listing for the eastern black rail

    October 5, 2018 | 12 minute readWhat action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is proposing to protect the eastern black rail, a small secretive marsh bird native to the United States, as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Partially migratory, the eastern black rail is known in as many as 36 states, plus multiple territories and countries in the Caribbean and Central and South America. It is one of four subspecies of black rail, which live in salt, brackish, and freshwater marshes. Learn more...

    Eastern black rail in flight – Texas, April 2016. Photo © Jesse Huth, used with permission, Huth Avian Services.

Lafayette

  • Birds flying around boom floating in the water to contain an oil spill.

    Environmental contaminants

    Pollution is one of America’s greatest environmental concerns. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is the primary federal agency dedicated to protecting wildlife and their habitats from pollution’s harmful effects. What we do The Service’s Louisiana environmental contaminants coordinator works with industry, as well as state and federal agencies, to ensure wildlife can co-exist with natural resource development as well as agriculture, forestry, and transportation activities. We are involved in: Learn more...

    Brown pelican feeding frenzy during BP oil spill response off Queen Bess Island, LA. Photo by Tom MacKenzie USFWS.

  • Small pink birds with rounded bills wade through the shallow water.

    For coastal communities

    Coastal program in Louisiana Program supports voluntary, proactive and cooperative projects in these areas, focusing efforts to restore and protect habitat for federal trust species. We provide technical expertise and financial assistance to: Private landowners and citizens; Native American tribes; Non-profit organizations; Municipal and local governments; Business and industry. Learn more about how we coordinate the coastal program in the southeast and at the national level. Coastal Wetlands Planning Protection and Restoration Act (CWPPRA) restoration activities Louisiana supports over 45 percent of the intertidal wetlands in the lower 48 states, but has suffered over 90 percent of the coastal wetland loss in the nation. Learn more...

    Roseate Spoonbills out in the water. Photo by Corey Douglas.

  • Heavy machinery.

    For developers: Conservation planning assistance

    Conserving habitat for fish and wildlife in Louisiana To protect the overall public interest, including the environment and our trust resources, Congress has mandated that certain public and private development activities require formal authorization and approval by the Federal Government or state agencies with delegated regulatory authority. Some of these development projects include: Hydropower and alternate energy development Highway construction and re-routing Pipeline construction Gravel mining Cell tower construction Construction or development in wetland habitats Coastal development The goal of the Louisiana Ecological Services Office‘s Conservation Planning Assistance Program work is to provide state-wide project evaluation and consultation for all of the Service’s trust resources. Learn more...

    Slash-buster after cleaning up the levee. Photo by Corey Douglas.

  • A map of the Louisiana delta with hundreds of points.

    Freedom of Information Act

    Documents: All Louisiana ES references 2017 Louisiana ES references 2016 Louisiana ES references Louisiana black bear Louisiana pine snake Search:  Learn more...

    A map of the Louisiana delta with hundreds of points indicating where the Service spends its resources. Map by Robert Greco, USFWS.

  • Map of wetlands across the country.

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

    The Louisiana Field Office utilizes the latest GIS applications to provide spatial analyses to all programs; Civil Works, Coastal Restoration & Protection, Conservation Planning Assistance, Endangered Species, Environmental Contaminants, and Partners for Fish & Wildlife. These tools provide the capability to look at landscape conservation and ecosystem management; assess habitat suitability, wildlife habitat management, and where to best put limited resources towards protection and recovery. We also provide GIS and GPS (global positioning system) support to national wildlife refuges for management plans, oil and gas exploration, elevation and geodetic benchmark surveys, remote sensing and habitat mapping. Learn more...

    National Wetlands Inventory mapper.

  • A yellow brick building with lots of windows.

    Louisiana Ecological Services Field Office

    The field station was established in 1972. We strive for ecosystem sustainability through preservation, conservation, enhancement, and restoration of habitats essential for the long-term viability of the fish, wildlife, and plants in Louisiana. Learn more...

    The Louisiana Ecological Services Field Office. Photo by USFWS.

  • Thousands of geese taking flight.

    Migratory birds

    The Migratory Bird Treaty Act was passed in 1918. That Act prohibits the taking, killing, possession, transportation, and importation of migratory birds, their eggs, parts, and nests; except when specifically authorized by the U.S. Department of the Interior. While the Act has no provision for allowing unauthorized take, the Service realizes that some birds may be harmed or killed as a result of project implementation even when reasonable measures to protect birds are implemented. Learn more...

    Geese flocking overhead. Photo by Corey Douglas.

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