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Tag: Louisiana Ecological Services Field Office

The content below has been tagged with the term “Louisiana Ecological Services Field Office.”

News

  • A white and black frog standing on dormant grass.
    Mississippi gopher frog. Photo by John A. Tupy, Western Carolina University.

    Fox & Friends story about steps to protect endangered Dusky Gopher Frog misses the mark

    June 19, 2012 | 4 minute read

    On Monday, June 18th, Fox & Friends broadcast a story about the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s designation of critical habitat for the dusky gopher frog. The gopher frog is protected under the Endangered Species Act and is listed as endangered. The agency’s action designates 6,477 acres across four counties in Mississippi and one parish in Louisiana. The story focused on one private landowner who owns 45,000 acres in St.  Read the full story...

  • Dormant vegetation in front of a lake banked by a small stand of pine trees.
    Upper Ouachita National Wildlife Refuge upper Louisiana Photo by Sean Gardner.

    Jeff Weller to lead U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services Lafayette office

    April 24, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Jeff Weller is the Fish and Wildlife Service’s new field supervisor for its Louisiana Ecological Services office in Lafayette, Louisiana. He began his duties February 13. The Louisiana Ecological Services office is involved in a number of important conservation issues including protecting and restoring ecosystems, habitats, and populations, with emphasis on wetlands and other declining habitats that support threatened and endangered species, migratory birds, and fisheries. As field supervisor, Jeff will represent the U.  Read the full story...

  • Thousands of ducks taking flight out of a marsh nearly cover the sky.
    Ducks at Upper Ouachita. Photo by Joseph McGowan, USFWS.

    Conservation effort in northern Louisiana is something to quack about

    April 20, 2012 | 4 minute read

    Morehouse Parish, Louisiana – The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) and The Conservation Fund announced today the completion of a multi-year project to add nearly 4,000 acres of mixed farmland and timberland to Upper Ouachita National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in northeastern Louisiana. This action secures the largest remaining inholding for the Refuge, enabling more effective management of the area for wildlife habitat and public recreation. Located along the Ouachita River at the Louisiana-Arkansas border, the Upper Ouachita NWR provides a seasonal haven for tens of thousands of migratory ducks and geese, including mallards, pintails, wood ducks and snow geese, which visit the refuge every year for resting, foraging and breeding.  Read the full story...

  • Two large, white, Whooping cranes flying in for a landing on a small pond.
    Two juvenile Whooping cranes released from their holding pen fly around on Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge, Decatur, AL. Photo by Bill Gates, USFWS.

    Ultralight-led whooping cranes released at Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge

    February 10, 2012 | 3 minute read

    The nine whooping cranes led by ultralight aircraft have been released from a holding pen at Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge after Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership biologists attached marking bands and transmitters to help track their movements. “So far the cranes are foraging and hanging around close to the pen and moving into the flooded fields,” said Bill Gates, Biologist at Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge, near Decatur and Huntsville, Ala. “We plan to leave the gate to the pen open, so if they need to come back here they can.  Read the full story...

  • A white and black frog standing on dormant grass.
    Mississippi gopher frog. Photo by John A. Tupy, Western Carolina University.

    Service to hold public hearing and re-open comment period on the revised proposed Critical Habitat designation and associated draft economic analysis for the Mississippi gopher frog

    January 13, 2012 | 6 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) announces a public hearing and the re-opening of the comment period on the revised proposed critical habitat designation and associated draft economic analysis for the endangered Mississippi gopher frog, as well as a change to the methodology used to delineate critical habitat for this species. The public hearing will be held at the Gulfport High School auditorium, 100 Perry Street, Gulfport, Mississippi 39507 on January 31, 2012, from 7:00 p.  Read the full story...

  • Three small black bear cubs yawning in unison.
    Louisiana black bear cubs. Photo by Brad Young, Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks.

    Restoring Louisiana black bear habitat

    March 31, 2011 | 1 minute read

    Louisiana black bears were hard-hit in the last century by the conversion of their bottomland hardwood forest habitat into agricultural fields. By 1992, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service declared the species as threatened with extinction. Since then, “tremendous progress has been made” in restoring their habitat, says Deborah Fuller, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Endangered Species Program Coordinator in Lafayette, LA. At least 200,000 acres in Louisiana have been set aside to encourage the bear’s recovery – much of the land is at or near Bayou Teche and Tensas River National Wildlife Refuges.  Read the full story...

  • Three children and a US Fish and Wildlife Service biologist crouch over a net with used to collect insects from a nearby stream.
    Dan Everson teaches children about the insects they collected in a stream. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    4-H national headquarters and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service honor Louisiana youth wetlands education and outreach 4-H program

    March 17, 2011 | 2 minute read

    The 4-H National Headquarters and the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service presented the 2011 Connecting Youth with Nature through Natural Resources Conservation Education Award to the Louisiana State University AgCenter’s 4-H Youth Wetlands Program at the 76th North American Wildlife and Natural Resources Conference being held in Missouri. The 4-H Youth Wetlands Program has approximately 85,000 students enrolled in their educational and outreach program in Louisiana. By developing and distributing wetland education curriculum and teaching materials at no cost to participating educators, this program strives to implement wetlands education in the classroom as well as in the field.  Read the full story...

  • Two large, white, Whooping cranes flying in for a landing on a small pond.
    Two juvenile Whooping cranes released from their holding pen fly around on Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge, Decatur, AL. Photo by Bill Gates, USFWS.

    Interior clears the way for return of whooping cranes to Louisiana

    February 8, 2011 | 4 minute read

    Washington, D.C. — The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service has cleared the way for the reintroduction of whooping cranes in Louisiana a half century after these endangered birds were last seen in the state, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar announced today. The Interior Department’s U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service published a regulation designating a potential Louisiana’s population as a non-essential, experimental population under the Endangered Species Act.  Read the full story...

  • Two brown pelicans fly in for a landing on the rocky shoreline.
    Brown pelicans flying near Queen Bess Island off Grand Isle, LA during BP oil spill response. Photo by Tom MacKenzie USFWS.

    Scientists ask public to report banded birds to help scientific research

    July 18, 2010 | 3 minute read

    Houma, Louisiana - With large numbers of birds being rescued, treated, and relocated in the Gulf States as a result of the BP oil spill, people seeing banded birds are asked to report sightings. As part of this unprecedented unified response to the BP oil spill, we are asking the public to help report oiled wildlife, as well. A large percentage of captured birds are being successfully treated and released back into the wild.  Read the full story...

  • Two brown pelicans fly in for a landing on the rocky shoreline.
    Brown pelicans flying near Queen Bess Island off Grand Isle, LA during BP oil spill response. Photo by Tom MacKenzie USFWS.

    Using sound science, the service addresses urgent habitat needs for birds and other wildlife along the Gulf coast

    July 8, 2010 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is coordinating efforts along the Gulf Coast to safeguard wildlife such as shorebirds, waterfowl, marsh birds, sea birds, and sea turtles from the effects of oil. Working closely with state, federal and non-government partners, the Service is identifying the most pressing habitat needs of these at-risk species, recommending strategic habitat conservation activities to address those needs, and helping to implement projects along the coast from Florida to Texas.  Read the full story...

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