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Tag: Louisiana Ecological Services Field Office

The content below has been tagged with the term “Louisiana Ecological Services Field Office.”

News

  • A strange looking salamander with horns.
    Reticulated flatwoods salamander larva. Photo by Kevin Enge, FWC.

    Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of 27 Southeastern species

    September 22, 2014 | 5 minute read

    The Atlantic salt marsh snake and the frosted flatwoods salamander are among 27 federally protected species that will be getting a check-up. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is launching five-year status reviews of 17 endangered species and 10 threatened species occurring in one or more of the 10 states across the Southeast Region and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. The Service is seeking comments and information from the public on all 27 species by November 24, 2014, 60 days from publication in the Federal Register.  Read the full story...

  • A bald eagle perched with its wings spread.
    A bald eagle prepares for flight. Photo by Richard Keen / RMA.

    $7,500 reward for information on bald eagle killing in Louisiana

    April 11, 2014 | 1 minute read

    VERRET, LA – The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries are investigating the killing of a bald eagle near Verret, Louisiana in St Bernard Parish. The eagle was discovered on April 4, 2014, near the fire station on Highway 300 and Bayou Road. A reward of up to $7,500 is being offered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and The Humane Society of the United States for information that leads to the arrest and conviction of the person(s) responsible for the killing.  Read the full story...

  • Long white birds flying in formation behind a fan powered glider.
    Information icon We hope for a tremendous viewing audience for this amazing spectacle! Photo by Nick Baldwin, a refuge volunteer from last years flyover.

    Endangered whooping cranes arrive at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, FL on aircraft-guided flight

    January 7, 2014 | 3 minute read

    Eight young whooping cranes that began their aircraft-led migration from the White River Marsh State Wildlife Area in Wisconsin, made it to their destination at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge in Florida.  Read the full story...

  • Long white birds flying in formation behind a fan powered glider.
    Information icon We hope for a tremendous viewing audience for this amazing spectacle! Photo by Nick Baldwin, a refuge volunteer from last years flyover.

    Endangered whooping cranes make it to Florida following ultralights

    December 31, 2013 | 4 minute read

    Eight young whooping cranes that began their aircraft-led migration on October 2, 2013, from the White River Marsh State Wildlife Area in Green Lake County, Wisconsin, today made it to Leon County, Florida.  Read the full story...

  • Airborne ultralight with whooping cranes following.
    Information icon Class of 2013 by Operation Migration. Photo by Heather Ray, Operation Migration.

    Endangered whooping cranes now in Georgia on aircraft-guided flight to Florida

    December 30, 2013 | 3 minute read

    Eight young whooping cranes that began their aircraft-led migration on October 2, 2013, from the White River Marsh State Wildlife Area in Green Lake County, Wisconsin, today made it to Decatur County, Georgia.  Read the full story...

  • Airborne ultralight with whooping cranes following.
    Information icon Class of 2013 by Operation Migration. Photo by Heather Ray, Operation Migration.

    Endangered whooping cranes now in Alabama on aircraft-guided flight to Florida

    December 12, 2013 | 5 minute read

    Eight young whooping cranes that began their aircraft-led migration on October 2, 2013 from the White River Marsh State Wildlife Area in Green Lake County, Wisconsin, today made it to Winston County, Alabama.  Read the full story...

  • A wet brown frog with bright green round eyes on fallen reeds.
    Oregon spotted frog at Conboy National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Teal Waterstrat, USFWS.

    Landmark study reveals low national rate of frog abnormalities on wildlife refuges

    November 19, 2013 | 3 minute read

    An unprecedented 10-year-study by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) shows encouraging results for frogs and toads on national wildlife refuges. The study, published today in the peer-reviewed online journal PLOS ONE, finds that on average, less than 2 percent of frogs and toads sampled on 152 refuges had physical abnormalities involving the skeleton and eyes – a lower rate than many experts feared based on earlier reports. This indicates that the severe malformations such as missing or extra limbs repeatedly reported in the media during the mid-1990s were actually very rare on national wildlife refuges.  Read the full story...

  • A small yellow breasted bird with grey feathers.
    Kirtland’s warblers nest exclusively in jack pine stands. Photo by Joel Trick, USFWS.

    Service approves incidental take permit for NiSource multi-state Habitat Conservation Plan

    November 14, 2013 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has issued an incidental take permit under the Endangered Species Act to NiSource Inc., a natural gas pipeline and transmission company, in conjunction with the company’s comprehensive plan to conserve dozens of endangered species while operating and maintaining its network of pipelines in 14 northeastern, Midwest and southeastern states. The habitat conservation plan covers activities in 14 states: Delaware, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia.  Read the full story...

  • A mussel with brownish outer shell and a glossy white inner shell that resembles a baked potato.
    Information icon Threatened rabbitsfoot mussel. Photo by Bob Butler, USFWS.

    Service proposes to protect neosho mucket and rabbitsfoot under the Endangered Species Act

    October 15, 2012 | 6 minute read

    Current evidence suggests that the Neosho mucket mussel is in danger of becoming extinct and the rabbitsfoot mussel may become threatened with extinction in the foreseeable future, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced today. As a result, the Service has proposed to protect the species under the Endangered Species Act, and is seeking new information from the public and the scientific community that will assist the agency in making a final determination.  Read the full story...

  • An orange and brown butterfly specimen.
    Female bay skipper. Photo by Charles T. and John R. Bryson CC BY 3.0 us, via Wikimedia Commons.

    Service completes status review of the bay skipper butterfly

    August 27, 2012 | 2 minute read

    The bay skipper butterfly does not warrant federal protection as an endangered or threatened species, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service concluded, following a status review initiated by a petition seeking to protect the species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and to designate critical habitat. “We conducted a status review of the bay skipper and actually discovered new populations of the butterfly in Texas and Louisiana and an expanded range of suitable habitat,” said Cindy Dohner, the Service’s Southeast Regional Director.  Read the full story...

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