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Tag: Louisiana Ecological Services Field Office

The content below has been tagged with the term “Louisiana Ecological Services Field Office.”

Articles

  • Keith Weaver: from tagging, tracking and naming, he knows the bears of the Tensas River Basin

    March 10, 2016 | 3 minute read

    A U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist-turned-project leader recalls efforts throughout his career to recover the Louisiana black bear.  Learn more...

  • A black bear in a field locks eyes with the camera as it eats grassy vegetation.
    Information icon Louisiana black bear. Photo by Pam Mcilhenny, used with permission.

    Louisiana black bear’s survival depends on people, says biologist

    March 10, 2016 | 2 minute read

    U.S. Geological Survey biologist Joseph Clark, who has many years’ experience researching various wild animals, is impressed by the Louisiana black bear’s intelligence and natural resilience.  Learn more...

  • A biologist taking a health assessment for a tranquilized bear
    Information icon Dwight LeBlanc with bear named “Liberty.” The bear was eating watermelons and corn and overturning beehives near Woodville, Wilkinson County, MS. Photo courtesy of Dwight LeBlanc.

    U.S. Department of Agriculture’s wildlife services plays key role in Louisiana black bear recovery

    March 10, 2016 | 2 minute read

    Back in the old days – in the early 90’s – when the Louisiana black bear was first listed under the Endangered Species Act, the Black Bear Conservation Committee (BBCC) was formed and USDA’s Wildlife Services was a key component. “We suggested to the first chair of the group that in order for recovery to succeed, they had to address the human/bear conflicts that would arise – both immediate and future conflicts – as a result of increasing numbers of bears,” said Dwight LeBlanc, Louisiana Wildlife Services state director.  Learn more...

News

  • Kemps ridley sea turtle laying in the sand. Large with grey shell and yellow body with grey speckles.
    Kemps ridley sea turtle. Photo by NER Sea Turtle Stranding Network.

    New report assesses the impacts of emerging threats on Gulf coast species and ecosystems

    November 13, 2015 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today released its Gulf Coast Vulnerability Assessment (GCVA), a comprehensive report that evaluates the effects of climate change, sea level rise and urbanization on four Gulf Coast ecosystems and 11 species that depend on them. The ecosystems are mangrove, oyster reef, tidal emergent marsh and barrier islands. The species are roseate spoonbill, blue crab, clapper rail, mottled duck, spotted seatrout, eastern oyster, American oystercatcher, red drum, black skimmer, Kemp’s ridley sea turtle and Wilson’s plover.  Read the full story...

  • Red-cockaded woodpecker flying from its nest.
    Information icon Red-cockaded woodpecker. Photo by Martjan Lammertink, U.S. Forest Service.

    Service, states, celebrate 20th anniversary of the safe harbor program offering voluntary land management agreements with private landowners

    November 6, 2015 | 4 minute read

    More than 400 private landowners across nine states are voluntarily managing their forests through the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Safe Harbor Program to benefit the endangered red-cockaded woodpecker. The eight State agencies administering the program to landowners received special recognition this week at the Annual Conference of the Southeastern Association Fish and Wildlife Agencies meeting in Asheville, North Carolina. “Private landowners have voluntarily enrolled almost 2.5 million acres in the Safe Harbor Program benefitting 835 groups of red-cockaded woodpeckers,” said Leopoldo Miranda, Assistant Regional Director of Ecological Services in the Southeast Region.  Read the full story...

  • A white and black frog standing on dormant grass.
    Mississippi gopher frog. Photo by John A. Tupy, Western Carolina University.

    Recovery plan for endangered frog available

    September 9, 2015 | 4 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is announcing the availability of the final recovery plan for the dusky gopher frog, federally listed as endangered. The dusky gopher frog, a stocky frog with a loud, guttural call, is heard less often now in the longleaf pine forests of Mississippi. Once also found in Louisiana and Alabama, now it is only found in four locations in Harrison and Jackson counties in southern Mississippi.  Read the full story...

  • A small brown bat on the roof of a cave with a fuzzy white fungus on its nose.
    A tri-color bat in the Avery County with white-nose syndrome. Photo by Gabrielle Graeter, NCWRC.

    Service awards grants to 35 states, District of Columbia for work on deadly bat disease

    July 1, 2015 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced grant awards totaling just under $1 million to 35 states and the District of Columbia for white-nose syndrome (WNS) projects. State natural resource agencies will use the funds to support research, monitor bat populations and prepare for and respond to WNS, a disease that afflicts bats. “White-nose syndrome has now been confirmed in 26 states and five Canadian provinces,” said Dr. Jeremy Coleman, the Service’s national WNS coordinator.  Read the full story...

  • A dark colored salamander with white spots on its stomach and sides.
    Caddo Mountain salamander. Photo by Aposematic herpetologist, CC-BY-NC 2.0.

    Federal wildlife officials respond to a petition to list dozens of species under the Endangered Species Act

    June 30, 2015 | 3 minute read

    In response to a 2012 petition claiming 53 reptiles and amphibians require federal protection under the Endangered Species Act, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) today published a batch of 90-day findings affecting 15 species of frogs, salamanders, snakes, skinks and crayfish found in the Southeast. Five petitioned species will not be given further consideration for federal protection at this time, and 10 species have triggered a deeper scientific review.  Read the full story...

  • A monarch butterfly perched on a bushy plant with bright yellow flowers.
    Monarch fueling up for migration. Photo by Lilibeth Serrano, USFWS.

    Fish and Wildlife Service and the Wildlife Habitat Council partner to save monarchs

    June 17, 2015 | 3 minute read

    Monarch populations have drastically declined over the past several years. To advance efforts to save this beautiful orange and black butterfly and its habitat, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Wildlife Habitat Council (WHC) are joining forces with a new cooperative agreement over the next two years to benefit the Monarch butterfly. Since 1988, WHC has promoted habitat conservation and management on corporate lands through partnerships and education.  Read the full story...

  • A Louisiana black bear standing in a grassy clearing
    Information icon Louisiana black bear. Credit: Pam McIlhenny, used with permission.

    Service announces public hearings on proposal to delist Louisiana black bear

    June 12, 2015 | 2 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is holding two public hearings in Louisiana to give the public opportunities to comment on its May 21, proposal to delist the Louisiana black bear. The Service is seeking comments regarding biological data, relevant data concerning any threats, and the extent of federal and state protection and management that would be provided to the bear as a delisted species. Other requested comments concern current or planned activities that may impact or benefit the bear.  Read the full story...

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