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Tag: Louisiana Ecological Services Field Office

The content below has been tagged with the term “Louisiana Ecological Services Field Office.”

Articles

  • Biologist Maria Davidson wearing camoflage holding a Louisiana black bear cub
    Information icon The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries’ Maria Davidson enjoys some up-close-and-personal time with a Louisiana black bear cub. Photo by USFWS.

    Bear biologist Maria Davidson educates people, relocates wayward bears

    March 10, 2016 | 2 minute read

    State of Louisiana employee Maria Davidson’s public outreach, relocation of “nuisance” bear and partnership efforts has helped the Louisiana black bear population recover.  Learn more...

  • Two biologists check on the health of a sedated Louisiana black bear
    Information icon The Service’s David Soileau (right) examines a tranquilized Louisiana Black Bear as part of an effort to study the recovery of the species’ population. Photo by USFWS.

    David Soileau: bringing the Louisiana black bear back from the brink

    March 10, 2016 | 2 minute read

    The Louisiana black bear recovery work of people like biologist/land conservation specialist David Soileau has been so successful that sightings of the species is no longer such an uncommon occurrence.  Learn more...

  • Three small black bear cubs yawning in unison.
    Louisiana black bear cubs. Photo by Brad Young, Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks.

    Debbie Fuller: working hard at work worth doing

    March 10, 2016 | 2 minute read

    Endangered Species Coordinator Debbie Fuller reflects on the opportunity to work hard at work worth doing: to help the threatened Louisiana black bear population recover.  Learn more...

  • Conservationists from the Natural Resources Conservation Service gather around the hood of a truck to investigate paperwork
    Information icon As the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service’s State Conservationist for Louisiana, Kevin Norton (center) has partnered with many people, to the benefit of the Louisiana black bear.

    Easement program a win-win for landowners and black bears

    March 10, 2016 | 2 minute read

    The rapid expansion of agriculture in the state of Louisiana was one of the factors pushing the Louisiana black bear to the edge of extinction. USDA’s Kevin Norton plays a key role in ensuring the bear has habitat while farmers benefit from restoring and conserving their land.  Learn more...

  • Keith Weaver: from tagging, tracking and naming, he knows the bears of the Tensas River Basin

    March 10, 2016 | 3 minute read

    A U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist-turned-project leader recalls efforts throughout his career to recover the Louisiana black bear.  Learn more...

  • A black bear in a field locks eyes with the camera as it eats grassy vegetation.
    Information icon Louisiana black bear. Photo by Pam Mcilhenny, used with permission.

    Louisiana black bear’s survival depends on people, says biologist

    March 10, 2016 | 2 minute read

    U.S. Geological Survey biologist Joseph Clark, who has many years’ experience researching various wild animals, is impressed by the Louisiana black bear’s intelligence and natural resilience.  Learn more...

  • A biologist taking a health assessment for a tranquilized bear
    Information icon Dwight LeBlanc with bear named “Liberty.” The bear was eating watermelons and corn and overturning beehives near Woodville, Wilkinson County, MS. Photo courtesy of Dwight LeBlanc.

    U.S. Department of Agriculture’s wildlife services plays key role in Louisiana black bear recovery

    March 10, 2016 | 2 minute read

    Back in the old days – in the early 90’s – when the Louisiana black bear was first listed under the Endangered Species Act, the Black Bear Conservation Committee (BBCC) was formed and USDA’s Wildlife Services was a key component. “We suggested to the first chair of the group that in order for recovery to succeed, they had to address the human/bear conflicts that would arise – both immediate and future conflicts – as a result of increasing numbers of bears,” said Dwight LeBlanc, Louisiana Wildlife Services state director.  Learn more...

News

  • A close up photo of a gray-silver salamander walking on a layer of wet moss.
    Information icon Cheoah bald salamander. Photo by Andy Kraemer, CC BY-NC 2.0.

    Four Southeastern species do not require federal protection, two others under further review

    March 15, 2016 | 2 minute read

    Today the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service published a batch of 90-day findings affecting a variety of species across the nation. Biologists have determined the following species found in the southeastern United States do not require further review for federal protection at this time: Cheoah bald salamander in North Carolina Monito skink in Puerto Rico Southern dusky salamander in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Texas, Virginia, and possibly South Carolina South Mountain gray-cheeked salamander in North Carolina.  Read the full story...

  • Kemps ridley sea turtle laying in the sand. Large with grey shell and yellow body with grey speckles.
    Kemps ridley sea turtle. Photo by NER Sea Turtle Stranding Network.

    New report assesses the impacts of emerging threats on Gulf coast species and ecosystems

    November 13, 2015 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today released its Gulf Coast Vulnerability Assessment (GCVA), a comprehensive report that evaluates the effects of climate change, sea level rise and urbanization on four Gulf Coast ecosystems and 11 species that depend on them. The ecosystems are mangrove, oyster reef, tidal emergent marsh and barrier islands. The species are roseate spoonbill, blue crab, clapper rail, mottled duck, spotted seatrout, eastern oyster, American oystercatcher, red drum, black skimmer, Kemp’s ridley sea turtle and Wilson’s plover.  Read the full story...

  • Red-cockaded woodpecker flying from its nest.
    Information icon Red-cockaded woodpecker. Photo by Martjan Lammertink, U.S. Forest Service.

    Service, states, celebrate 20th anniversary of the safe harbor program offering voluntary land management agreements with private landowners

    November 6, 2015 | 4 minute read

    More than 400 private landowners across nine states are voluntarily managing their forests through the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Safe Harbor Program to benefit the endangered red-cockaded woodpecker. The eight State agencies administering the program to landowners received special recognition this week at the Annual Conference of the Southeastern Association Fish and Wildlife Agencies meeting in Asheville, North Carolina. “Private landowners have voluntarily enrolled almost 2.5 million acres in the Safe Harbor Program benefitting 835 groups of red-cockaded woodpeckers,” said Leopoldo Miranda, Assistant Regional Director of Ecological Services in the Southeast Region.  Read the full story...

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