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Tag: Louisiana Ecological Services Field Office

The content below has been tagged with the term “Louisiana Ecological Services Field Office.”

Articles

  • Pelicans dot an island landscape shot from above with a single large pelican flying near the elevated camera.
    Information icon A brown pelican soars over others on Queen Bess Island, Louisiana. Photo by USFWS.

    Island restoration project and partnerships playing key role in future of the brown pelican

    June 14, 2019 | 3 minute read

    It may not be widely known that Louisiana, the Pelican State, had lost for almost a decade all of its namesake brown pelicans. In the early 1900’s Louisiana’s brown pelican population was estimated at 50,000 to 80,000. The widespread use of the insecticide DDT, however, took a huge toll on many bird species, including the brown pelican. By 1963, the bird was no longer found anywhere in the state. Today, the birds are back and their numbers around the state are staying steady.  Learn more...

  • Service uses weevils to control invasive salvinia that threatens Louisiana coast

    September 6, 2018 | 4 minute read

    Giant salvinia is an invasive floating fern from Brazil that can double its surface acreage in less than one week in optimal conditions. It has been spreading and causing problems in coastal Louisiana since 1989. Once it covers the water’s surface, this floating plant will begin to stack up upon itself, and can extend 12 inches or more above the water surface. Under such conditions, oxygen recharge of underlying waters is greatly reduced.  Learn more...

  • A biologist holds a long snake in front of a crowd of interns.
    Information icon Steve Shively, Wildlife Biologist with Kisatchie National Forest shows off a Louisiana pinesnake. Photo courtesy of Louisiana Public Broadcasting.

    Federal agencies helping landowners rebuild habitat for Louisiana pinesnake

    June 8, 2018 | 1 minute read

    Federal biologists from a number of agencies work together to recover the Louisiana pinesnake. Video by Louisiana Public Broadcasting Download the video.  Learn more...

  • 2018 Family Adventure Day in Louisiana

    May 31, 2018 | 2 minute read

    On March 10, 2018, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Louisiana Ecological Services Field Office and the Baton Rouge Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office participated in the Healing House’s Family Adventure Day fundraiser and community outreach event in Lafayette, Louisiana  Learn more...

News

  • New regional director to head southeastern conservation efforts Fish and Wildlife Service

    December 10, 2018 | 2 minute read

    Service officials announced late last month that Leopoldo “Leo” Miranda will head the Service’s Southeast Region. The tract encompasses 10 southeastern states as well as Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.  Read the full story...

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

    Service proposes to list the eastern black rail as threatened under the Endangered Species Act

    October 5, 2018 | 5 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and its partners are working to protect a small, secretive marsh bird that is in steep decline. Some populations of the eastern black rail along the Atlantic coast have dropped by as much as 90 percent, and with a relatively small total population remaining across the eastern United States, the Service is proposing to list the subspecies as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).  Read the full story...

  • A patterned black and gray snake blends in to the strewn, dark pine needles on the forest floor.
    Louisiana pinesnake. Photo by Michael Sealy, USFWS.

    Notice of Availability of a draft environmental assessment for a proposed rule under section 4(d) of the Endangered Species Act for the Louisiana pinesnake

    September 18, 2018 | 1 minute read

    Comments Comments will be accepted until October 18, 2018. Addresses You may submit comments, or requests for or more information, by any of the following methods: Email: Lafayette@fws.gov. Include “Louisiana Pinesnake EA” in the subject line Fax: [ATTN: Joseph Ranson], 337-291-3139 U.S. Mail: 646 Cajundome Blvd, Suite 400, Lafayette, LA 70506 In-person drop-off, viewing, or pickup: Call 337-291-3100 to make an appointment (necessary for view/pickup only) during regular business hours at 646 Cajundome Blvd, Suite 400, Lafayette, LA, 70506 In person viewing: U.  Read the full story...

  • A low growing shrub with bright purple flowers.
    Information icon Endangered Pyne’s ground-plum. Photo by NPS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of 35 Southeastern species

    May 7, 2018 | 5 minute read

    As part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of 35 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife, and plants. These species are found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before July 6, 2018. These five-year reviews will ensure listing classifications under the ESA are accurate and recommend changes in status where appropriate based on the latest science and analysis.  Read the full story...

  • A patterned black and gray snake blends in to the strewn, dark pine needles on the forest floor.
    Louisiana pinesnake. Photo by Michael Sealy, USFWS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service protects rare constrictor snake of Louisiana, Texas; proposes additional conservation measures

    April 5, 2018 | 4 minute read

    Based on a rigorous review of the best available science, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is listing the Louisiana pinesnake as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). A threatened designation means a species is likely to become endangered within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range. Found only in the pine forests of north and central Louisiana and east Texas, the Louisiana pinesnake, a large, non-venomous constrictor snake, has declined significantly over the past several decades.  Read the full story...

  • Biologists wearing white gowns head-to-toe walking through nets in a marsh holding whooping cranes.
    Information icon Biologists tend to whooping cranes in one of the release pens at White Lake Wetlands Conservation Area. Photo by Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service considers changes to protect endangered whooping cranes

    March 7, 2018 | 2 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is working with many partners led by state wildlife agencies, conservation groups and zoos, to secure the whooping crane’s recovery. They were first classified as endangered in 1967. Once numbering as few as only 14 cranes, they now number about 700 that live both in the wild in the United States and Canada, and in captive facilities where they can safely breed.  Read the full story...

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