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Tag: Louisiana Ecological Services Field Office

The content below has been tagged with the term “Louisiana Ecological Services Field Office.”

Articles

  • A biologist holds a long snake in front of a crowd of interns.
    Information icon Steve Shively, Wildlife Biologist with Kisatchie National Forest shows off a Louisiana pinesnake. Photo courtesy of Louisiana Public Broadcasting.

    Federal agencies helping landowners rebuild habitat for Louisiana pinesnake

    June 8, 2018 | 1 minute read

    Federal biologists from a number of agencies work together to recover the Louisiana pinesnake. Video by Louisiana Public Broadcasting Download the video.  Learn more...

  • 2018 Family Adventure Day in Louisiana

    May 31, 2018 | 2 minute read

    On March 10, 2018, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Louisiana Ecological Services Field Office and the Baton Rouge Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office participated in the Healing House’s Family Adventure Day fundraiser and community outreach event in Lafayette, Louisiana  Learn more...

  • A biologist showing off a Louisiana pinsnake.
    Information icon Thomas Athens (Center), David Castellanos, and Sharna Tolfree introduce Luigi, the Louisiana pinesnake, to Family Adventure Day participants. Photo by Angela Trahan, USFWS.

    Family adventure day in Louisiana

    May 3, 2017 | 1 minute read

    On March 11, 2017, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Louisiana Ecological Services Office and the Baton Rouge Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office participated in the Healing House’s Family Adventure Day fundraiser and community outreach event in Lafayette, Louisiana. The Healing House provides support for children grieving the loss of a loved one. The Service’s station was one of 43 activity locations that families could visit throughout Lafayette. More than 250 participants selected the Service’s activity as one of their adventures.  Learn more...

  • Biologists wearing white gowns head-to-toe walking through nets in a marsh holding whooping cranes.
    Information icon Biologists tend to whooping cranes in one of the release pens at White Lake Wetlands Conservation Area. Photo by Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.

    Whooping crane reintroduction continues in Louisiana

    May 3, 2017 | 2 minute read

    The whooping crane reintroduction effort is well underway in southwestern Louisiana. Since 2011, 10-16 hatched juveniles have been released annually here into the non-essential experimental population (NEP). The original release pens are located at White Lake Wetlands Conservation Area, and in 2016 a new release area was added 19 miles to the south at Rockefeller Wildlife Refuge. The expanded release areas allow the NEP to receive more juvenile cranes for release into the wild.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A small, long fish with dark spots and a long dorsal fin in an aquarium.
    Pearl darter. Photo by Conservation Fisheries, Inc., JR Shute.

    Final Rule to List the Pearl darter as Threatened

    September 19, 2017 | 4 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) taking? The Service is protecting the Pearl darter under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as a threatened species. Threatened status means this fish may become endangered throughout a significant part of its range in the foreseeable future if steps are not taken to conserve it and its habitat. What is the Pearl darter? The Pearl darter is a freshwater fish measuring about two and a half inches in length.  Learn more...

News

  • A low growing shrub with bright purple flowers.
    Information icon Endangered Pyne’s ground-plum. Photo by NPS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of 35 Southeastern species

    May 7, 2018 | 5 minute read

    As part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of 35 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife, and plants. These species are found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before July 6, 2018. These five-year reviews will ensure listing classifications under the ESA are accurate and recommend changes in status where appropriate based on the latest science and analysis.  Read the full story...

  • A patterned black and gray snake blends in to the strewn, dark pine needles on the forest floor.
    Louisiana pinesnake. Photo by Michael Sealy, USFWS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service protects rare constrictor snake of Louisiana, Texas; proposes additional conservation measures

    April 5, 2018 | 4 minute read

    Based on a rigorous review of the best available science, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is listing the Louisiana pinesnake as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). A threatened designation means a species is likely to become endangered within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range. Found only in the pine forests of north and central Louisiana and east Texas, the Louisiana pinesnake, a large, non-venomous constrictor snake, has declined significantly over the past several decades.  Read the full story...

  • Biologists wearing white gowns head-to-toe walking through nets in a marsh holding whooping cranes.
    Information icon Biologists tend to whooping cranes in one of the release pens at White Lake Wetlands Conservation Area. Photo by Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service considers changes to protect endangered whooping cranes

    March 7, 2018 | 2 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is working with many partners led by state wildlife agencies, conservation groups and zoos, to secure the whooping crane’s recovery. They were first classified as endangered in 1967. Once numbering as few as only 14 cranes, they now number about 700 that live both in the wild in the United States and Canada, and in captive facilities where they can safely breed.  Read the full story...

  • A patterned black and gray snake blends in to the strewn, dark pine needles on the forest floor.
    Information icon Louisiana pinesnake. Photo by Michael Sealy, USFWS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service extends deadline on Louisiana pinesnake ruling

    October 5, 2017 | 2 minute read

    One of the rarest snakes in North America, the Louisiana pinesnake, is found only in isolated, mostly longleaf pine forests in Louisiana and Texas.  Read the full story...

  • A small, long fish with dark spots and a long dorsal fin in an aquarium.
    Pearl darter. Photo by Conservation Fisheries, Inc., JR Shute.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service extends Endangered Species Act protection to rare fish

    September 19, 2017 | 3 minute read

    It has been more than 40 years since the Pearl darter – a small, snub-nosed fish – lived in the Pearl River system in Louisiana and Mississippi. Today, it is only found in the Pascagoula River system in Mississippi and poor water quality is taking a toll on the tiny fish. To safeguard this species, the Service has added the Pearl darter to the list of protected wildlife under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).  Read the full story...

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