skip to content

Tag: Louisiana Ecological Services Field Office

The content below has been tagged with the term “Louisiana Ecological Services Field Office.”

Articles

  • dark brown shell with green 0149 label in forefront with multiple other shells sticking out of sand underwater
    Information icon A Louisiana pearlshell mussel. Credit: USFWS.

    Louisiana Partners for Fish and Wildlife helps recover federally threatened Louisiana pearlshell mussel

    December 14, 2020 | 2 minute read

    Pity the poor pearlshell. Under siege from dams, beavers and sediment-filled water. Found in only two Louisiana parishes. Federally listed as a threatened species. Help’s on the way, though. A bevy of private and public partners has joined with the Louisiana Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program to improve the mussel’s habitat and, hopefully, put the bivalve on the road to recovery. Last summer, Monica Sikes, the recovery team’s lead biologist, helped coordinate the reintroduction of juvenile mussels on several streams in central Louisiana.  Learn more...

Faq

  • Two small white birds with yellow beaks and black marking on head on the beach
    Information icon Interior least terns. Photo by USFWS

    Removal of interior least tern from the list of endangered and threatened wildlife - Questions and answers

    January 11, 2021 | 6 minute read

    What is an interior least tern? Least terns are the smallest members of the tern family. Terns are generally considered seabirds, but several species are also found along rivers, lakes, or other wetlands. The interior least tern is a migratory bird species, nesting along freshwater habitats of the Missouri and Mississippi rivers and their major tributaries and overwintering in the Caribbean and South America. Least terns feed primarily on small fish.  Learn more...

  • A woodpecker perched on a tree with a bug in its mouth
    Information icon A red-cockaded woodpecker has dinner outside its nesting cavity. Photo by USFWS.

    Virtual informational meeting and public hearing on proposed downlisting of red-cockaded woodpecker

    November 10, 2020 | 7 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is announcing a public hearing on the proposed downlisting of the red-cockaded woodpecker from endangered to threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The virtual public hearing will be held via Zoom and teleconference on Tuesday, December 1, 2020 from 6-9 p.m. Eastern Time. Why is the Service taking this action? On Oct. 8, 2020, the Service published a rule proposing to downlist the red-cockaded woodpecker from endangered to threatened under the ESA.  Learn more...

  • A tiny, featherless bird on a blanket with small ankle bands
    Information icon Red-cockaded woodpecker photo by Lynda Richardson, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries.

    Proposed downlisting of the red-cockaded woodpecker from endangered to threatened

    September 25, 2020 | 11 minute read

    Download the proposed rule to downlist the red-cockaded woodpecker from endangered to threatened with a section 4(d) rule. What is a red-cockaded woodpecker? The red-cockaded woodpecker is a territorial, non-migratory bird species of the southeastern and southern United States. It grows to about eight to nine inches long, about the size of the common cardinal, and has a wingspan of about 15 inches. The red-cockaded woodpecker’s most distinguishing feature is a black cap and nape that encircle large white cheek patches.  Learn more...

Lafayette

  • A yellow brick building with lots of windows.
    Information icon The Louisiana Ecological Services Field Office. Photo by USFWS.

    Louisiana Ecological Services Field Office

    The field station was established in 1972. We strive for ecosystem sustainability through preservation, conservation, enhancement, and restoration of habitats essential for the long-term viability of the fish, wildlife, and plants in Louisiana.  Learn more...

  • Small pink birds with rounded bills wade through the shallow water.
    Roseate Spoonbills out in the water. Photo by Corey Douglas.

    For coastal communities

    Coastal program in Louisiana Program supports voluntary, proactive and cooperative projects in these areas, focusing efforts to restore and protect habitat for federal trust species. We provide technical expertise and financial assistance to: Private landowners and citizens; Native American tribes; Non-profit organizations; Municipal and local governments; Business and industry. Learn more about how we coordinate the coastal program in the southeast and at the national level. Coastal Wetlands Planning Protection and Restoration Act (CWPPRA) restoration activities Louisiana supports over 45 percent of the intertidal wetlands in the lower 48 states, but has suffered over 90 percent of the coastal wetland loss in the nation.  Learn more...

  • Heavy machinery.
    Slash-buster after cleaning up the levee. Photo by Corey Douglas.

    For developers: Conservation planning assistance

    Conserving habitat for fish and wildlife in Louisiana To protect the overall public interest, including the environment and our trust resources, Congress has mandated that certain public and private development activities require formal authorization and approval by the Federal Government or state agencies with delegated regulatory authority. Some of these development projects include: Hydropower and alternate energy development Highway construction and re-routing Pipeline construction Gravel mining Cell tower construction Construction or development in wetland habitats Coastal development The goal of the Louisiana Ecological Services Office‘s Conservation Planning Assistance Program work is to provide state-wide project evaluation and consultation for all of the Service’s trust resources.  Learn more...

News

  • Two small white birds with yellow beaks and black marking on head on the beach
    Information icon Interior least terns. Photo by USFWS

    Trump Administration celebrates recovery of America’s smallest tern

    January 11, 2021 | 6 minute read

    After more than three decades of conservation partnerships inspired by the Endangered Species Act, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is celebrating the delisting of the interior least tern due to recovery. According to the best available science, the diverse efforts of local, state and federal stakeholders across the interior least tern’s 18-state range have helped ensure populations are healthy, stable and increasing into the foreseeable future. The tern will continue to be protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.  Read the full story...

  • A woodpecker perched on a tree with a bug in its mouth
    Information icon A red-cockaded woodpecker has dinner outside its nesting cavity. Photo by USFWS.

    Service announces public hearing on proposed downlisting of red-cockaded woodpecker

    November 12, 2020 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will hold a public hearing on the proposed downlisting of the red-cockaded woodpecker. The virtual public hearing will be held on December 1, 2020 via Zoom and teleconference, in accordance with COVID-19 pandemic public gathering rules. Virtual meetings are also consistent with Service regulations at 50 CFR 424.16©(3). “The Service is committed to transparency in all of our science-based decisions and to the input of stakeholders and the public,” said Service Regional Director Leo Miranda.  Read the full story...

  • A woodpecker perched on a tree with a bug in its mouth
    Information icon A red-cockaded woodpecker has dinner outside its nesting cavity. Photo by USFWS.

    Trump Administration proposes downlisting of red-cockaded woodpecker under Endangered Species Act

    September 25, 2020 | 13 minute read

    Fort Benning, Georgia — Secretary of the Interior David L. Bernhardt, Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue and Fort Benning Garrison Commander, Col. Matthew Scalia, were joined by public and private representatives today to celebrate the proposed downlisting of the red-cockaded woodpecker from endangered to threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). In the Southeast, no fewer than eight Army installations, four Air Force installations and one Marine Corps installation all made commitments to recovery goals for red-cockaded woodpeckers, which is a cardinal-sized bird, 8 to 9 inches in height with a sharp beak, living on land they manage.  Read the full story...

Contact Us:

Looking for a media contact? Reach out to a regional spokesperson.

Share this page

Tweet this page on Twitter or follow @USFWSsoutheast

Share this page on Facebook or follow USFWSsoutheast.

LinkedIn

Share this page on LinkedIn