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Tag: Louisiana Ecological Services Field Office

The content below has been tagged with the term “Louisiana Ecological Services Field Office.”

Articles

  • Service uses weevils to control invasive salvinia that threatens Louisiana coast

    September 6, 2018 | 4 minute readGiant salvinia is an invasive floating fern from Brazil that can double its surface acreage in less than one week in optimal conditions. It has been spreading and causing problems in coastal Louisiana since 1989. Once it covers the water’s surface, this floating plant will begin to stack up upon itself, and can extend 12 inches or more above the water surface. Under such conditions, oxygen recharge of underlying waters is greatly reduced. Learn more...

  • A biologist holds a long snake in front of a crowd of interns.

    Federal agencies helping landowners rebuild habitat for Louisiana pinesnake

    June 8, 2018 | 1 minute read Federal biologists from a number of agencies work together to recover the Louisiana pinesnake. Video by Louisiana Public Broadcasting Download the video.  Learn more...

    Steve Shively, Wildlife Biologist with Kisatchie National Forest shows off a Louisiana pinesnake. Photo courtesy of Louisiana Public Broadcasting.

  • 2018 Family Adventure Day in Louisiana

    May 31, 2018 | 2 minute readOn March 10, 2018, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s [Louisiana Ecological Services Field Office](/lafayette) and the Baton Rouge Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office participated in the Healing House’s Family Adventure Day fundraiser and community outreach event in Lafayette, Louisiana Learn more...

Lafayette

  • Small pink birds with rounded bills wade through the shallow water.

    For coastal communities

    Coastal program in Louisiana Program supports voluntary, proactive and cooperative projects in these areas, focusing efforts to restore and protect habitat for federal trust species. We provide technical expertise and financial assistance to: Private landowners and citizens; Native American tribes; Non-profit organizations; Municipal and local governments; Business and industry. Learn more about how we coordinate the coastal program in the southeast and at the national level. Coastal Wetlands Planning Protection and Restoration Act (CWPPRA) restoration activities Louisiana supports over 45 percent of the intertidal wetlands in the lower 48 states, but has suffered over 90 percent of the coastal wetland loss in the nation. Learn more...

    Roseate Spoonbills out in the water. Photo by Corey Douglas.

  • Heavy machinery.

    For developers: Conservation planning assistance

    Conserving habitat for fish and wildlife in Louisiana To protect the overall public interest, including the environment and our trust resources, Congress has mandated that certain public and private development activities require formal authorization and approval by the Federal Government or state agencies with delegated regulatory authority. Some of these development projects include: Hydropower and alternate energy development Highway construction and re-routing Pipeline construction Gravel mining Cell tower construction Construction or development in wetland habitats Coastal development The goal of the Louisiana Ecological Services Office‘s Conservation Planning Assistance Program work is to provide state-wide project evaluation and consultation for all of the Service’s trust resources. Learn more...

    Slash-buster after cleaning up the levee. Photo by Corey Douglas.

  • A yellow brick building with lots of windows.

    Louisiana Ecological Services Field Office

    The field station was established in 1972. We strive for ecosystem sustainability through preservation, conservation, enhancement, and restoration of habitats essential for the long-term viability of the fish, wildlife, and plants in Louisiana. Learn more...

    The Louisiana Ecological Services Field Office. Photo by USFWS.

News

  • New regional director to head southeastern conservation efforts Fish and Wildlife Service

    December 10, 2018 | 2 minute readService officials announced late last month that Leopoldo “Leo” Miranda will head the Service’s Southeast Region. The tract encompasses 10 southeastern states as well as Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Read the full story...

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.

    Service proposes to list the eastern black rail as threatened under the Endangered Species Act

    October 5, 2018 | 5 minute readThe U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and its partners are working to protect a small, secretive marsh bird that is in steep decline. Some populations of the eastern black rail along the Atlantic coast have dropped by as much as 90 percent, and with a relatively small total population remaining across the eastern United States, the Service is proposing to list the subspecies as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Read the full story...

    Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

  • A patterned black and gray snake blends in to the strewn, dark pine needles on the forest floor.

    Notice of Availability of a draft environmental assessment for a proposed rule under section 4(d) of the Endangered Species Act for the Louisiana pinesnake

    September 18, 2018 | 1 minute readComments Comments will be accepted until October 18, 2018. Addresses You may submit comments, or requests for or more information, by any of the following methods: Email: Lafayette@fws.gov. Include “Louisiana Pinesnake EA” in the subject line Fax: [ATTN: Joseph Ranson], 337-291-3139 U.S. Mail: 646 Cajundome Blvd, Suite 400, Lafayette, LA 70506 In-person drop-off, viewing, or pickup: Call 337-291-3100 to make an appointment (necessary for view/pickup only) during regular business hours at 646 Cajundome Blvd, Suite 400, Lafayette, LA, 70506 In person viewing: U. Read the full story...

    Louisiana pinesnake. Photo by Michael Sealy, USFWS.

  • A low growing shrub with bright purple flowers.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of 35 Southeastern species

    May 7, 2018 | 5 minute readAs part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of 35 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife, and plants. These species are found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before July 6, 2018. These five-year reviews will ensure listing classifications under the ESA are accurate and recommend changes in status where appropriate based on the latest science and analysis. Read the full story...

    Endangered Pyne’s ground-plum. Photo by NPS.

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