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Tag: Louisiana Black Bear

The content below has been tagged with the term “Louisiana Black Bear.”

Articles

  • Biologist Maria Davidson wearing camoflage holding a Louisiana black bear cub
    Information icon The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries’ Maria Davidson enjoys some up-close-and-personal time with a Louisiana black bear cub. Photo by USFWS.

    Bear biologist Maria Davidson educates people, relocates wayward bears

    March 10, 2016 | 2 minute read

    State of Louisiana employee Maria Davidson’s public outreach, relocation of “nuisance” bear and partnership efforts has helped the Louisiana black bear population recover.  Learn more...

  • Two biologists check on the health of a sedated Louisiana black bear
    Information icon The Service’s David Soileau (right) examines a tranquilized Louisiana Black Bear as part of an effort to study the recovery of the species’ population. Photo by USFWS.

    David Soileau: bringing the Louisiana black bear back from the brink

    March 10, 2016 | 2 minute read

    The Louisiana black bear recovery work of people like biologist/land conservation specialist David Soileau has been so successful that sightings of the species is no longer such an uncommon occurrence.  Learn more...

  • Three small black bear cubs yawning in unison.
    Louisiana black bear cubs. Photo by Brad Young, Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks.

    Debbie Fuller: working hard at work worth doing

    March 10, 2016 | 2 minute read

    Endangered Species Coordinator Debbie Fuller reflects on the opportunity to work hard at work worth doing: to help the threatened Louisiana black bear population recover.  Learn more...

  • Conservationists from the Natural Resources Conservation Service gather around the hood of a truck to investigate paperwork
    Information icon As the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service’s State Conservationist for Louisiana, Kevin Norton (center) has partnered with many people, to the benefit of the Louisiana black bear.

    Easement program a win-win for landowners and black bears

    March 10, 2016 | 2 minute read

    The rapid expansion of agriculture in the state of Louisiana was one of the factors pushing the Louisiana black bear to the edge of extinction. USDA’s Kevin Norton plays a key role in ensuring the bear has habitat while farmers benefit from restoring and conserving their land.  Learn more...

  • Keith Weaver: from tagging, tracking and naming, he knows the bears of the Tensas River Basin

    March 10, 2016 | 3 minute read

    A U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist-turned-project leader recalls efforts throughout his career to recover the Louisiana black bear.  Learn more...

  • A black bear in a field locks eyes with the camera as it eats grassy vegetation.
    Information icon Louisiana black bear. Photo by Pam Mcilhenny, used with permission.

    Louisiana black bear’s survival depends on people, says biologist

    March 10, 2016 | 2 minute read

    U.S. Geological Survey biologist Joseph Clark, who has many years’ experience researching various wild animals, is impressed by the Louisiana black bear’s intelligence and natural resilience.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A large black bear with a small cub nestled in the upper branches of a hardwood tree.
    Information icon Louisiana black bear female with her two cubs in a tree. Photo by Clint Turnage, USDA.

    Louisiana black bear removed from the list of threatened and endangered species due to recovery

    March 10, 2016 | 11 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced on March 10, 2016, it will officially remove the Louisiana black bear (Ursus americanus luteolus) from the Lists of Threatened and Endangered Wildlife under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) due to recovery. The Service published a proposed rule to delist the bear on May 21, 2015. Why is the Service delisting the Louisiana black bear? Due to the efforts of the Service and its partners, the threats to the Louisiana black bear have been eliminated or reduced, and adequate regulatory mechanisms exist for its long-term protection.  Learn more...

Lafayette

  • A large black bear with a small cub nestled in the upper branches of a hardwood tree.
    Information icon Louisiana black bear female with her two cubs in a tree. Photo by Clint Turnage, USDA.

    Endangered species and recovery

    One of the primary responsibilities of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is to protect and recover imperiled species and the ecosystems upon which they depend. Congress defined “species” to include subspecies, varieties, and, for vertebrates, distinct population segments. The Endangered Species Act (ESA) is America’s strongest conservation law. Originally passed by Congress in 1973, the ESA is jointly administered by the Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS).  Learn more...

News

  • A large grey bird flying in front of a bright blue sky.
    Brown pelican. Photo by Jon. D. Anderson CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    May 19th is Endangered Species Day

    May 19, 2017 | 4 minute read

    Endangered Species Day was created by a Senate resolution in 2006 to encourage “the people of the United States to become educated about, and aware of, threats to species, success stories in species recovery, and the opportunity to promote species conservation worldwide.” It has since been celebrated in more than a dozen other countries as well. Today, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is proud to celebrate this annual day, and to honor the recovery work being done under the Endangered Species Act, (ESA) which protects endangered and threatened species and the ecosystems upon which they depend, and helps them recover.  Read the full story...

  • Three small black bear cubs yawning in unison.
    Louisiana black bear cubs. Photo by Brad Young, Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks.

    The teddy bear is back: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service delists Louisiana black bear due to recovery

    March 10, 2016 | 5 minute read

    TALLULAH, LA – U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell today announced that due to 24 years of dedicated recovery efforts by a broad array of partners, the Louisiana black bear—the inspiration for the teddy bear—will be removed from the Federal Lists of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife. The species restoration is a significant conservation success and further demonstrates the value of the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Jewell was joined by U.  Read the full story...

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